YouTube has removed hundreds of videos which encourage academic cheating

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Puddles the Monkey
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http://uk.businessinsider.com/youtub...-videos-2018-5

"Sam Gyimah, the Universities Minister for England, told the BBC that the site is "clearly wrong because it is enabling and normalizing cheating potentially on an industrial scale.""

Here's the BBC article from a week or so ago:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-43956001

Have you ever come accross these ads? Would you be tempted to use one of these services....?
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-Eirlys-
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(Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
http://uk.businessinsider.com/youtub...-videos-2018-5

"Sam Gyimah, the Universities Minister for England, told the BBC that the site is "clearly wrong because it is enabling and normalizing cheating potentially on an industrial scale.""

Here's the BBC article from a week or so ago:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-43956001

Have you ever come accross these ads? Would you be tempted to use one of these services....?
Yes I have seen a few on Facebook and Youtube and I think it's appalling! I couldn't believe my eyes when they were selling essays and very popular people were advertising for it, like it was totally normal and acceptable. A tutor at my uni discussed the issue too and said that things may change to all exams and less essays to prevent this type of cheating. I am glad Youtube has done something about this.

I would never buy an essay or plagiarise. It is not worth doing and they wouldn't write as good as me anyway. I've come across essays online and they are actually of low quality or they don't answer the question correctly so they would just bring down your score if anything.
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Notoriety
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I don't see adverts on YT (nor on here ).
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Puddles the Monkey
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(Original post by hannxm)
Yes I have seen a few on Facebook and Youtube and I think it's appalling! I couldn't believe my eyes when they were selling essays and very popular people were advertising for it, like it was totally normal and acceptable. A tutor at my uni discussed the issue too and said that things may change to all exams and less essays to prevent this type of cheating. I am glad Youtube has done something about this.

I would never buy an essay or plagiarise. It is not worth doing and they wouldn't write as good as me anyway. I've come across essays online and they are actually of low quality or they don't answer the question correctly so they would just bring down your score if anything.
I can't remember what company it was but they have popped up on Facebook for me - I was quite surprised as it was a full on essay writing service ad - tons of comments of people tagging their mates in, etc. I was surprised to see people happy to engage with it so openly!

:eek3:
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Doones
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(Original post by Notoriety)
I don't see adverts on YT (nor on here ).
The essay writing "ads" are endorsements made by YouTubers during their normal video posts. They aren't separate ads fixable by adblockers.

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-Eirlys-
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(Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
I can't remember what company it was but they have popped up on Facebook for me - I was quite surprised as it was a full on essay writing service ad - tons of comments of people tagging their mates in, etc. I was surprised to see people happy to engage with it so openly!

:eek3:
I know, it's terrible! I just hope they get caught out and they get kicked out of university and have to face the consequence. You don't learn anything if you do nothing but cheat! It's not at all worth the risk.
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somemightsay888
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Haha I've seen Chinese students using these services in front of me. It's stunning, not sure if they've ever been caught too 😳
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username3905222
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Isn't that the Edubirdie scandal thing
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1lyke1africa
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Ultimately people that use these services are only disadvantaging themselves by not taking full advantage of the education they spend nine grand a year on. If it means that they come out of uni with a better degree and better employment prospects,then I guess that's great for them, but they'll have to see if they can sink or swim in a world where you can't pay someone else to do your work for you.
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Puddles the Monkey
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(Original post by 1lyke1africa)
Ultimately people that use these services are only disadvantaging themselves by not taking full advantage of the education they spend nine grand a year on. If it means that they come out of uni with a better degree and better employment prospects,then I guess that's great for them, but they'll have to see if they can sink or swim in a world where you can't pay someone else to do your work for you.
I'd feel the same way, but.... as an obvious example, what if they then end up in a career like pharmacy/nursing/medicine/ where they're responsible for people's health and they actually don't know anything because they bought their way through uni? That's a bit worrying :afraid:
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1lyke1africa
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(Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
I'd feel the same way, but.... as an obvious example, what if they then end up in a career like pharmacy/nursing/medicine/ where they're responsible for people's health and they actually don't know anything because they bought their way through uni? That's a bit worrying :afraid:
Then we should be thankful for the abundance of over-assessment of the NHS work-force. Medical professionals that aren't up to scratch won't last long in their jobs. And if they are good enough to be doctors or nurses despite their laziness, then their cheating at uni doesn't matter.
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04MR17
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So youtube (owned by google) do pay attention when government kick up a fuss. I wonder if we can now persuade them to pay more tax.

(Original post by snovvhite)
Isn't that the Edubirdie scandal thing
They seem to be the biggest culprits yes.
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xoxAngel_Kxox
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It's amazing how many people try to cheat. I am a freelancer writer, editor & proofreader and I've lost count of the amount of times I've been hired to proofread a piece and they've said something like "and please try to add things to make it better if you can".

I always say no. I will happily proofread, but I NEVER change the actual academic content of an assignment, because it doesn't sit right morally for me. I don't care how much they offer to pay me, I literally always say no.
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NonIndigenous
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I think it's a good thing. This might surprise some people that might have read some of my previous posts on the topic.

Though at this stage I don't think this will change much. Having Edubirdie in the BBC news just gave them even more publicity.

Literally everyone knows about it now. So, Edubirdie wins anyway, since you can still go to their website and pay for coursework.
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Joinedup
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(Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
I'd feel the same way, but.... as an obvious example, what if they then end up in a career like pharmacy/nursing/medicine/ where they're responsible for people's health and they actually don't know anything because they bought their way through uni? That's a bit worrying :afraid:
Well the high profile exposes so far seem to have focussed on business studies and law afaict
e.g. https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episod...t-loan-scandal
high levels of placement should prevent flat out fraudulent nursing students from using maintenance loans as free money while working full time jobs, but probably the powers that be could have a look at the amount of coursework involved anyway.
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Notoriety
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
The essay writing "ads" are endorsements made by YouTubers during their normal video posts. They aren't separate ads fixable by adblockers.

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Well, in that case, I don't watch these YTers who talk about sitting A-Levels etc.

You see them quite a bit on FB. Had essay writing services pop up a lot, and that new one which asks for past papers and lecture powerpoints/notes from your uni. Can't help but think the latter case might expose yourself majorly to being sued by your uni.
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Student-95
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(Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
I'd feel the same way, but.... as an obvious example, what if they then end up in a career like pharmacy/nursing/medicine/ where they're responsible for people's health and they actually don't know anything because they bought their way through uni? That's a bit worrying :afraid:
Graduates aren't competent straight out of uni regardless of whether or not they cheated. If you got lengthy industrial experience then you may be an exception but for the most part, a graduate will need on-the-job training and supervision.
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Student-95
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(Original post by xoxAngel_Kxox)
It's amazing how many people try to cheat. I am a freelancer writer, editor & proofreader and I've lost count of the amount of times I've been hired to proofread a piece and they've said something like "and please try to add things to make it better if you can".

I always say no. I will happily proofread, but I NEVER change the actual academic content of an assignment, because it doesn't sit right morally for me. I don't care how much they offer to pay me, I literally always say no.
So when you're proofreading what feedback do you actually give? If you're pointing out errors (I assume you are otherwise what's the point) then you are helping them and improving their mark. It's not as bad but it's still collusion.
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Puddles the Monkey
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(Original post by Student-95)
Graduates aren't competent straight out of uni regardless of whether or not they cheated. If you got lengthy industrial experience then you may be an exception but for the most part, a graduate will need on-the-job training and supervision.
Surely the degree has some relevance? :holmes: Otherwise why bother hiring graduates at all.....?
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Doones
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(Original post by Student-95)
So when you're proofreading what feedback do you actually give? If you're pointing out errors (I assume you are otherwise what's the point) then you are helping them and improving their mark. It's not as bad but it's still collusion.
Depends on the university rules, many allow proofreading and will specify permissible feedback.

Eg. https://www1.essex.ac.uk/proofreadin...px#appropriate



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