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    Can you do it. Im on a level 7 in physics but 5 in math and my teacher won't let me do higher cause she's so ****
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    There's no calculus in A Level physics but there are some logarithms so whilst it's not necessary to do maths, you should still practice it a bit in a level. If you're doing AQA, the textbook has a few chapters just about maths.
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    (Original post by Sinnoh)
    There's no calculus in A Level physics but there are some logarithms so whilst it's not necessary to do maths, you should still practice it a bit in a level. If you're doing AQA, the textbook has a few chapters just about maths.
    So you don't need a level maths for physics?
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    (Original post by Obfuscated)
    So you don't need a level maths for physics?
    Need? No.
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    So i can do a level physics. The whole course, without a level maths?
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    (Original post by Sinnoh)
    Need? No.
    Read above if you have time. Thanks
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    As mentioned above, physics doesn't contain any calculus but it does contain logarithms. This is fairly rudimentary stuff - and from what I remember it is not a large part of the spec - but it would be prudent to take a look over the logarithms chapter in any maths textbook and familarise yourself with the concept.

    Physics at A-level does contain a fair amount of mechanics, which tends to favour those doing M1-5 alongside their maths/further maths A-levels, but I am aware of many people who didn't decide to do the applied mechanics modules in maths yet still excelled in their physics papers. The mechanics you'll come across in A-level physics doesn't actually require too much mathematical knowhow, other than a general familiarity with solving problems, but will definitely require you to put in work (bonus points if you get the pun).

    I would suggest possibly sourcing a physics textbook for the exam board that you will be doing to see if the content is something that you think you can handle. Also try borrowing a maths textbook, or even looking online, to brush up on the basics. Don't forget, though, things always seem hard if you haven't seen them before. If you pay attention in class nothing is really difficult.

    EDIT: I vaguely remember a girl from my A-level physics class who decided to take physics without maths. She was always adamant that she hated maths and was bad at it but I believe she went on to do quite well in her exams.
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    Hi there

    A lot of people here have said it but I'm gonna be official here.

    The Physics A Level reform was specifically designed in order to accommodate those who don't do A Level maths, in order to make sure that people who don't do maths and those who do have an 'equal' chance of succeeding.

    That being said, while it is true that more people who take A Level Maths with Physics do tend to attain higher, the Physics course is by no means inaccessible if you don't do A Level Maths. The actual maths required in your AS is very basic, which requires nothing beyond grade 7-9 GCSE standard of Maths. It does contain a lot of Mechanics, however most of the mechanics at Physics isn't entirely comparable to the kind you do in Maths.

    In A2, the most you will ever have to see is perhaps a logarithm, the concept behind this is basic and will probably be taught quite quickly by teachers. Even still I don't recall seeing many 'advanced' mathematical techniques in the Physics A Level. I suggest picking up a textbook or the spec and taking a quick flick through, deciding whether it looks for you.

    One thing I like to mention that distinguishes Physics is subtlety. Whilst the mathematics itself, and the formulae required, are very trivial and the operations somewhat basic. The thing that makes it a tough A Level is finding where to apply it and when to apply it, Physics A Level will reward you more for problem solving and creative thinking than just sheer maths. That being said, the reason I say Maths people tend to the upper ends is because typically those doing Maths/FM have done tougher mechanics so are accustomed to the problem solving in Mechanics, however the course is designed to be accomodating to all, so as long as you like the subject enough and are a problem solver, I don't think there's a problem by not taking Maths.
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    I love the subject hence level 7. But that's amazing. Thank you for telling me. I feel more motivated
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    (Original post by Obfuscated)
    I love the subject hence level 7. But that's amazing. Thank you for telling me. I feel more motivated
    Maths you will need to learn and practice to become confident at Physics at A-level:

    Rounding decimals to an appropriate number of significant figures;
    Algebra and rearranging formulae (including fractions, roots, powers, trig functions, exponentials and logs);
    Constructing and manipulating algebraic expressions from a description of the problems given;
    Trigonometry (sin, cos, tan, arcsin, arcos, arctan and rules for manipulation), angles (acute, obtuse), calculations using degrees and radians;
    Pythagoras theorems, radius, circumference, perimeter, surface areas and volumes of regular solids (circles, cylinders, spheres, rectangles, triangles etc.);
    Powers, basic rules for manipulation;
    Exponentials, conversion of units;
    Logarithms;
    Resolving vectors using trigonometry;
    Plotting and reading graphs - including linear/linear, log/linear and log/log scales;
    Areas under a curve, asymptotes, tangents to a curve;
    Gradients and rates of change;
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    (Original post by uberteknik)
    Maths you will need to learn and practice to become confident at Physics at A-level:

    Rounding decimals to an appropriate number of significant figures;
    Algebra and rearranging formulae (including fractions, roots, powers, trig functions, exponentials and logs);
    Constructing and manipulating algebraic expressions from a description of the problems given;
    Trigonometry (sin, cos, tan, arcsin, arcos, arctan and rules for manipulation), angles (acute, obtuse), calculations using degrees and radians;
    Pythagoras theorems, radius, circumference, perimeter, surface areas and volumes of regular solids (circles, cylinders, spheres, rectangles, triangles etc.);
    Powers, basic rules for manipulation;
    Exponentials, conversion of units;
    Logarithms;
    Resolving vectors using trigonometry;
    Plotting and reading graphs - including linear/linear, log/linear and log/log scales;
    Areas under a curve, asymptotes, tangents to a curve;
    Gradients and rates of change;
    In my upcoming holiday after gcse's end (15 june) i will take a large 5 week break then start revising these topics. Half of the topics you listed i know ( basic trig values pythagourous )
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    Well for our school sixth form if you want to take A level physics, you need a requirement of a level 6 on maths at GCSE. However since you're taking the foundation tier you can only get a level 5, so you can't do either subject.
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    (Original post by Tanzil Rahman)
    Well for our school sixth form if you want to take A level physics, you need a requirement of a level 6 on maths at GCSE. However since you're taking the foundation tier you can only get a level 5, so you can't do either subject.
    A 5 is easy as hell. But im on a level 7 for physics. So can i not do a level physics?
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    My teacher is so **** she thinks i can't get a 6 when clearly i was getting 5's in every foundation mock
 
 
 

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