ineeedhellp
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Can someone please explain to me how metallic bonding actually works,

I know that the free electrons become delocalised but I don't know how or what happens to those delocalised electrons

Thanks.
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igotnomoney
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(Original post by ineeedhellp)
Can someone please explain to me how metallic bonding actually works,

I know that the free electrons become delocalised but I don't know how or what happens to those delocalised electrons

Thanks.
All you need to know is that it is a giant structure where *positive* ions are surrounded by delovslosrd electrons which are *free to move* .. it is the movement of these electrons that let the metal have property of conducting electricity .. that's all you need to know .. good luck
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ineeedhellp
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(Original post by igotnomoney)
All you need to know is that it is a giant structure where *positive* ions are surrounded by delovslosrd electrons which are *free to move* .. it is the movement of these electrons that let the metal have property of conducting electricity .. that's all you need to know .. good luck
this may sound stupid but is there only 1 metal involved
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Kian Stevens
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(Original post by ineeedhellp)
this may sound stupid but is there only 1 metal involved
Yes. Only one metal is involved because it's how the metal itself is structured; the metal isn't bonded to other metals, is it?

Metals have giant metallic lattices, and these have metallic bonding which keeps the ions together - this is the electrostatic attraction between positive metal ions (just for clarification, these are only the ions of a single metal, not many) and a sea of delocalised electrons.
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igotnomoney
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(Original post by ineeedhellp)
this may sound stupid but is there only 1 metal involved
Yes .. so let's say sodium, magnesium and all the metals .. I see where you confused .. it is not like two different element bonding like it is in ionic and covalent bonding e.g NaCl ...
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ineeedhellp
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(Original post by igotnomoney)
Yes .. so let's say sodium, magnesium and all the metals .. I see where you confused .. it is not like two different element bonding like it is in ionic and covalent bonding e.g NaCl ...
does the metal lose or gain a charge or not because its only electrons being transferred not ions
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Kian Stevens
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(Original post by ineeedhellp)
does the metal lose or gain a charge or not because its only electrons being transferred not ions
Metals lose electrons, so gain positive charge. There's no ion transfer during ionic bonding...
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