blackbeaut
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The main message is help.

I've been trying to self-study Korean for the last few months and I feel I'm not further forward I can't see any classes on my area and some of the online classes I've looked into. I've seem dodgy reviews so I'm just unsure.

Tbh I prefer studying on my own but maybe I'm not doing it right idk.

How do you self-study a language?

Any tips/tricks are helpful
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username3941570
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You have the internet and books.
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SplittingTheAt0m
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Make sure you learn the grammar of the language which you can learn through a variety of means; there are plently of apt resources on the internet or if you buy a grammar book on Korean.

You can buy a dictionary and start making flashcards (for example) on important words and vocabulary then start branching out your vocabulary to more advanced, less known things.

Hope this helps,
James.
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ArcticArcher
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Try Duolingo, I believe they have Korean now! I find it helps as you get taught vocabulary and pronunciation at whichever pace you’d like. It also has a community aspect so you could ask other members for help.
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Astreniel
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I'm not sure which websites you've seen, nor what level of Korean you understand, but I recommend Memrise.com.
Also, for me, trying to read as much as I can understand of a different language on packets, online, etc. really helps.
Also: watching/listening to a TV show, or videos, with subtitles.
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Rory_Evan
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I'm a self-taught language nerd, I speak Italian German Dutch and Serbian to a good level, as well as my only native language English. I think I can weigh in a little here even though I'm not a total expert. I've noticed with Serbian (my latest project) I can absorb it pretty quickly because I've had experience with other languages, so I'd say my first tip would be variety - keep going with not just Korean but maybe various other languages, mostly to see how you learn. I know people advise not to learn too many at once but honestly after a while it might well pay off, or maybe that's just me.

My second tip would be intensity. DON'T just look over a little bit every few days. Make sure you're doing it - especially at the beginning - EVERY day, for maybe an hour, two hours, three hours, however long you can afford. These intense sessions I've really found the key to improving my Serbian, because I get into a "Serbian-mindset". It's like, you know when in English you can recognise patterns in words, like abstract nouns ending in -ship and -tion, etc etc? You get familiar with these kinds of constructions (-stvo is one in Serbian, for example). Not just that, but I generally talk to myself extensively in my target language in these sessions, which gets me (once I've got the pronunciation down with pronunciation guides online & videos etc) going with the flow of the language, speaking quicker, more naturally, less hesitantly, so forth.

Thirdly get to grips with the grammar as early on as you can. This isn't just copying down all the tables for conjugations, declensions, person, number, whatever. This is actually UNDERSTANDING the various MAJOR points of language and what to do in a majority of cases; you can learn the ablative at any time you like down the line, what matters at the beginning are generally these things:
1) CONJUGATIONS - learn your present tense conjugations as early as you can so you can make BASIC sentences
2) NOUNS - learn your basic nouns & their nominative/accusative cases (may not apply to all languages - I don't think Korean has these!)
3) learn to PLURALISE nouns
4) learn how ADJECTIVES work - do they change their ending based on the gender, etc. of the noun, and do they come before or after the noun?
After this you can say many sentences from "I have a red car" to "Mary is my favourite friend and she is great". There's a wide variety of very simple sentences that just require present verbs, subject/object nouns & adjectives.

Once you are COMFORTABLE & FAMILIAR (make sure you are - don't rush too quickly, but it shouldn't take too long if you're doing in intesively) with this basic grammar, you have the building blocks of the language and you're able to then progress quite nicely onwards.

Make sure you learn new vocab ALL THE TIME. I find the best way of getting a wide vocabulary in a language is using Memrise, a free online website for memorising vocab. Do this a bit before you learn the grammar points I listed above and a lot afterwards. I take a quantity over quality approach initially as I learn just as many words as I can in maybe half an hour of purely learning words, and then speed reviewing after that, and repeating like this. You'll undoubtedly forget some words but if you repeat this process you'll remember 90% of them AND have quite a large vocab too!

The best way to solidify your building blocks is by building on top of them!

Don't then forget about more advanced things, like building more complicated sentences with conjunctions and question particles etc etc. Learn words for "that", "what", "this", "it", "which", "why", "because", etc. Not only that but you'll need "if" a lot too!

Remember that this isn't EVERYTHING in learning a language. I'm a very intense learner and I get very immersed quickly but without actual cultural immersion or a real life language buddy (unfortunately never had one in Serbian yet) I doubt I'll get fluent like this. But I do know a lot of the most important parts - think of the 80-20 rule, you'll learn the 80% very quickly and then you'll have a great standing to learn the final 20% when the opportunities come.

In summary I think that ultimately learning languages through my experience has been about asking the right questions. You need to know what you need to know, like the grammar points I listed above, because they are the most key and most commonly used aspects of a language I find. This works for me, I hope it works for you too!

Good luck

Rory
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blackbeaut
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(Original post by The Relic)
You have the internet and books.
Thanks for that
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blackbeaut
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(Original post by Astreniel)
I'm not sure which websites you've seen, nor what level of Korean you understand, but I recommend Memrise.com.
Also, for me, trying to read as much as I can understand of a different language on packets, online, etc. really helps.
Also: watching/listening to a TV show, or videos, with subtitles.
I've never heard of Memrise - I'll have a look into it. How is it for studying wise?
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blackbeaut
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(Original post by ArcticArcher)
Try Duolingo, I believe they have Korean now! I find it helps as you get taught vocabulary and pronunciation at whichever pace you’d like. It also has a community aspect so you could ask other members for help.
I tried duolingo, idk it wasn't working for me but I like the pronunciation part, really helped with that!
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blackbeaut
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(Original post by SplittingTheAt0m)
Make sure you learn the grammar of the language which you can learn through a variety of means; there are plently of apt resources on the internet or if you buy a grammar book on Korean.

You can buy a dictionary and start making flashcards (for example) on important words and vocabulary then start branching out your vocabulary to more advanced, less known things.

Hope this helps,
James.
Yeah I've looked into Talk To Me in Korean, a lot of people have recommended that so I bought level 1 books from there.

I wish shops had more resources (books wise) in the UK
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blackbeaut
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(Original post by Rory_Evan)
I'm a self-taught language nerd, I speak Italian German Dutch and Serbian to a good level, as well as my only native language English. I think I can weigh in a little here even though I'm not a total expert. I've noticed with Serbian (my latest project) I can absorb it pretty quickly because I've had experience with other languages, so I'd say my first tip would be variety - keep going with not just Korean but maybe various other languages, mostly to see how you learn. I know people advise not to learn too many at once but honestly after a while it might well pay off, or maybe that's just me.

My second tip would be intensity. DON'T just look over a little bit every few days. Make sure you're doing it - especially at the beginning - EVERY day, for maybe an hour, two hours, three hours, however long you can afford. These intense sessions I've really found the key to improving my Serbian, because I get into a "Serbian-mindset". It's like, you know when in English you can recognise patterns in words, like abstract nouns ending in -ship and -tion, etc etc? You get familiar with these kinds of constructions (-stvo is one in Serbian, for example). Not just that, but I generally talk to myself extensively in my target language in these sessions, which gets me (once I've got the pronunciation down with pronunciation guides online & videos etc) going with the flow of the language, speaking quicker, more naturally, less hesitantly, so forth.

Thirdly get to grips with the grammar as early on as you can. This isn't just copying down all the tables for conjugations, declensions, person, number, whatever. This is actually UNDERSTANDING the various MAJOR points of language and what to do in a majority of cases; you can learn the ablative at any time you like down the line, what matters at the beginning are generally these things:
1) CONJUGATIONS - learn your present tense conjugations as early as you can so you can make BASIC sentences
2) NOUNS - learn your basic nouns & their nominative/accusative cases (may not apply to all languages - I don't think Korean has these!)
3) learn to PLURALISE nouns
4) learn how ADJECTIVES work - do they change their ending based on the gender, etc. of the noun, and do they come before or after the noun?
After this you can say many sentences from "I have a red car" to "Mary is my favourite friend and she is great". There's a wide variety of very simple sentences that just require present verbs, subject/object nouns & adjectives.

Once you are COMFORTABLE & FAMILIAR (make sure you are - don't rush too quickly, but it shouldn't take too long if you're doing in intesively) with this basic grammar, you have the building blocks of the language and you're able to then progress quite nicely onwards.

Make sure you learn new vocab ALL THE TIME. I find the best way of getting a wide vocabulary in a language is using Memrise, a free online website for memorising vocab. Do this a bit before you learn the grammar points I listed above and a lot afterwards. I take a quantity over quality approach initially as I learn just as many words as I can in maybe half an hour of purely learning words, and then speed reviewing after that, and repeating like this. You'll undoubtedly forget some words but if you repeat this process you'll remember 90% of them AND have quite a large vocab too!

The best way to solidify your building blocks is by building on top of them!

Don't then forget about more advanced things, like building more complicated sentences with conjunctions and question particles etc etc. Learn words for "that", "what", "this", "it", "which", "why", "because", etc. Not only that but you'll need "if" a lot too!

Remember that this isn't EVERYTHING in learning a language. I'm a very intense learner and I get very immersed quickly but without actual cultural immersion or a real life language buddy (unfortunately never had one in Serbian yet) I doubt I'll get fluent like this. But I do know a lot of the most important parts - think of the 80-20 rule, you'll learn the 80% very quickly and then you'll have a great standing to learn the final 20% when the opportunities come.

In summary I think that ultimately learning languages through my experience has been about asking the right questions. You need to know what you need to know, like the grammar points I listed above, because they are the most key and most commonly used aspects of a language I find. This works for me, I hope it works for you too!

Good luck

Rory
Thanks for this - I actually want to learn more languages (Russian, Italian pick up Spanish and French again)

It's a different way of learning but I'm opening to new ways of learning it faster. I do learn it every other day but I think I need to be more dedicated to it.

Do you find it hard learning by yourself or do you prefer it Rory_Evan?
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Astreniel
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(Original post by blackbeaut)
I've never heard of Memrise - I'll have a look into it. How is it for studying wise?
It's really good for repetition and it gives you an idea of how good you are in specific areas of your language so that you can focus on those. There are also so many different resources/courses that you could use; it provides a great variety. Of course, I'm learning French, not Korean, so it could be different for you.
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ArcticArcher
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(Original post by blackbeaut)
I tried duolingo, idk it wasn't working for me but I like the pronunciation part, really helped with that!
Ah ok! Well, I suggest you just grab ahold of as many resources as possible, look online and the AppStore/google play, and practice, practice, practice.

Go over content until you feel assured in your capabilities, and read aloud as much as you can!
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Ryanzmw
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(Original post by blackbeaut)
Thanks for this - I actually want to learn more languages (Russian, Italian pick up Spanish and French again)

It's a different way of learning but I'm opening to new ways of learning it faster. I do learn it every other day but I think I need to be more dedicated to it.

Do you find it hard learning by yourself or do you prefer it Rory_Evan?
I've been learning Russian and Japanese for years now by myself and consider myself 'alright', so if you have any questions feel free to ask.

I recommend learning as much basic grammar as you can to get started, this is like the foundations because otherwise you'll get incredibly confused in trying to glean new words from sentences because the form in which they appear will vary. That being said, at first just learn to recognise the form of the word and what it signifies, without stressing yourself about being able to form that specific declension or conjugation of the word. For example if I see выступающий and I'm a beginner, I shouldn't stress myself about how to form it but should be able to recognise it as the 'present active imperfect participle' (aka. currently -ing) of выступать.

Then once you can recognise all the basic constructs of the language and have brute force learnt the super basic vocabulary (like first 500 words or so), go back and review the basic grammar points and then try to learn new vocabulary in context by either talking to natives or watching tv with subtitles (in the target language!)

Specifically, I hear that Korean is very similar to Japanese in grammar. So you'd need to surround yourself with as much Korean material as you possibly can, and often. It's very important to get used to 'thinking in Korean'. That is, getting yourself used to how things are phrased in Korean which will, at first, seem very strange given that it's an SOV language (Subject Object Verb). Furthermore, don't write off the difficulties that Korean having a non-latin script presents just because you can read hangul competently after a week of study. The challenges are far more subtle than that because it's super easy to overestimate your reading speed, so get plenty of reading practice in.

I also find karaoke of songs you know fun whilst helping you practice your pronunciation.

All that being said it takes time and patience to learn a language. You'll feel like you're stagnating and have hit a plateau but then suddenly you'll have bursts of achievement and realise how far you've come.

Any questions feel free to ask.
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crocodile_ears
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There's a list of 625 key words you should know to learn a language, if you scroll halfway down the page of the link below you'll fine them.

https://fluent-forever.com/the-metho...cabulary-list/

(this one talks a bit about Spanish, but you could apply the list to anything)
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Rory_Evan
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(Original post by blackbeaut)
Thanks for this - I actually want to learn more languages (Russian, Italian pick up Spanish and French again)

It's a different way of learning but I'm opening to new ways of learning it faster. I do learn it every other day but I think I need to be more dedicated to it.

Do you find it hard learning by yourself or do you prefer it Rory_Evan?
Yo sorry I'm late.

I learn by myself mostly out of necessity because none of my family or friends are that into languages. I would recommend Tandem app though which lets you talk with a whole load of people in your target languages, and you also help them with English if you want.

It's a great app and everyone on it is really friendly and around 15-20 age range too.
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Mehru1214
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(Original post by blackbeaut)
The main message is help.

I've been trying to self-study Korean for the last few months and I feel I'm not further forward I can't see any classes on my area and some of the online classes I've looked into. I've seem dodgy reviews so I'm just unsure.

Tbh I prefer studying on my own but maybe I'm not doing it right idk.

How do you self-study a language?

Any tips/tricks are helpful
use memrise.com
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