Strangest battles in history

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Andrew97
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Says it all in the title really.

This is one of my nominations. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Karánsebes.

It takes a special effort to loose to the Ottomans before they turn up.
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Andrew97
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Another battle that was rather strange was one (who’s name escapes me) in which the French managed to defeat the Dutch Navy with a cavalry charge, due to the water freezing over.
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PTMalewski
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Battle of Byczyna 1588 - Parliament of the Republic of Both Nations couldn't agree on whom should be a new king, and two parties elected two different kings on separate meetings. One part of the parliament elected Sigismund Vasa, the other Maximilian III. Both candidates were determined to get the crown- this meant war. Hetman Jan Zamoyski took side of the Swedish candidate and attacked forces of the Austrian candidate at Byczyna.
Zamoyski ergo Sigismund won the battle in spite of the fact that a part of his army attacked itself. This is how it happened:

Rotamaster Kostrzemiński gives an order: Attack them, Sirs brothers, take your sabres! Hearing this, Sir Górski, from a great family: I am not your brother, I didn't pasture pigs with you! In battle and battle order, then the rotamaster jumped to him and hit him with side of his sabre to calm him down; but sir Górski asked all his retinue and ordered an attack on the rotamaster. Others defend the rotamaster and there is no battle with an enemy, a half of our unit assaults the other half, they have almost chopped each other completely, 60 noble heads fell that day. The enemy didn't even move his finger, still achieved what he wanted, he got the field as there was no one left to protect it.
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Stalin
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The Battle of Alesia or Siege of Alesia.
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Royal Knight
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The battle was rather standard, but the aftermath of the Battle of Lincoln in 1217 was pretty funny. According to The History of William Marshal (1220s), a cow became stuck in the main city gate, trapping most of the routing French/English rebel army meaning that a lot of them were taken prisoner.

The source is quite awry in its interpretation of some events, but I'd like to think that particular one is true :p:
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Evilstr99
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One of these confrontations that will never escape my mind is the Battle of Tsushima in 1905. It was on the eve of May shortly after the beginning of the Russo-Japanese War with the Japanese attack on Port Arthur. Fairly outgunned, the Russian Navy had to deploy their Baltic Fleet to support the Pacific Fleet. Normally, they would travel through the Suez Canal. However, since the British closed the Canal in reprisal after a Russian warship opened fire on a British Trawler, misidentified it for a Japanese warship.
The Fleet had to travel around Africa and towards Port Arthur where they encountered the Japanese Fleet at Tsushima. While Russia had the manpower, Japan hugely outnumbered the Baltic Fleet and annihilated it in a single day. It appeared that this was the decisive war that determined the balance of power in the Far East.

But travelling what, 20,000 miles just to get destroyed? That's such a humiliation.

The Charge of the Light Brigade is also interesting in its respect outside Balaklava in the Crimea, 1854. Cardigan's Cavalry identified what appeared to be a weak Russian formation with the aim of breaching their lines. Turned out they had it wrong, and they were charging towards a row of heavy guns and heavy artillery. It was practically a bloodbath from then on.
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username1221160
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The war of the one eyed woman, not so much for the battle but for the absurd reason for it.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Batt...ire_Na_Creiche
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PTMalewski
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Speaking of the Japanese, the 16 years long Polish-Japanese war.

On December 20th, 1941 Polish Government in Exile declared war on Japan, however, Japan refused to accept the challenge, understanding the Poles did not have any other choice.
Although the two states formally found themselves in the state of war, Polish and Japanese intelligence services continued their pre-war cooperation.
This included exchanging information on the Soviet Union, providing Manchukuo's documents for agents of the Polish intelligence, and even exchanging information related to Germany, as well as providing a safe house for the Polish intelligence and radio station inside the Japanese embassy in Berlin.
Japanese diplomats were also extremely helpful for the Polish diplomats in other cities. In Kowno for example, they provided documents which allowed escape of 3500 Jews, while in Praha a consular car that was used by one of the Polish agents to travel safely around Czechy and Slovakia.

Although there were plans to send a destroyer ORP Burza (Republic's of Poland Ship 'Storm' ), and a cruiser ORP Dragon to the Pacific, these were however dropped since both the Polish government and crews of the ships were displeased with the idea of fighting Japan. The ORP Dragon's captain openly commented, the idea was nonsense.

In the end, only one man was sent to fight the Japanese (except for crews of two transport ships). Witold Urbanowicz, an ace of the Battle of Britain, who wished to come back to active service, was sent to China and fought in the "Tiger Sharks" squadron. Urbanowicz claims he destroyed 11 Japanese fighters, 6 in air combat, and further 5 on airfields.

The war has officially ended on the 8th June 1957, however during it's 16 years course, both sides did not fight a single battle and together cooperated against Japan's ally, which Japan has found untrustworthy after they had learned about the Ribbentrop-Molotov pact, while they found the Polish secret service reliable, and perfectly loyal.
The Germans had large trouble tracking the Polish radio station in Berlin, after all, who would have thought the enemy radio is in his alliance's embassy?

Japan however wasn't the only German ally who decided to act against its alliance for the sake of the relationship with Poland.
Once the Hungarian government learned of the Reich's plans of invasion, the Hungarians refused to take part in it, threatening the Hungarian army will sooner fight against Wehrmacht if it attempts to cross the Hungarian border. On the 19th September 1939 Polish 10th (Armoured) Cavalry Brigade, "the Black Devils" crossed the Hungarian border in combat order, with their tanks and other vehicles. Hungary welcomed their as friends, provided shelter and help with an escape to the West.
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Andrew97
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I feel the battle of castle Itter from WW2 should get a mention. The only battle in the war in which German and American troops fought side by side.
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Andrew97
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Those two are going to die alone aren’t they?
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ShishaSmoker
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https://youtu.be/ukznXQ3MgN0
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NJA
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(Original post by Andrew97)
Says it all in the title really.

This is one of my nominations. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Karánsebes.

It takes a special effort to loose to the Ottomans before they turn up.
I'll read that.

Another one was to loose the Ottomans after they had turned up in force in Jerusalem having already defeated the Allies at Gallipoli.

They were spooked out of the city!

Story here.
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daniellesydney
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Not technically a battle? But still an iconic moment in history: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emu_War
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esralled
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During the Austro-Prussian War of 1866, Prince Johann II placed his soldiers at the disposal of the Confederation but only to “defend the German territory of Tyrol”. The Prince refused to have his men fight against other Germans. The Liechtenstein contingent took up position on the Stilfse Joch in the south of Liechtenstein to defend the Liechtenstein/Austrian border against attacks by the Italians under Garibaldi. A reserve of 20 men remained in Liechtenstein. When the war ended on July 22, the army of Liechtenstein marched home to a ceremonial welcome in Vaduz. Popular legend claims that 80 men went to war but 81 came back. Apparently an Austrian liaison officer joined up with the contingent on the way back
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Realitysreflexx
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https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sher...rch_to_the_Sea

Shermans march to the sea, after breaking the confederacy and destroying all infrastructure in ultimately, your own damn country (U.S).
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shadowdweller
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The battle in the OP is particularly bizarre
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