lawstudent048381
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Starting Sept 2018 but have some time off until then. Looking to try and see if I can get the name of the textbooks that LSE use to teach each first year unit to read ahead a bit.

Any other suggestions to prepare etc also appreciated. Cheers
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999tigger
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(Original post by lawboi98)
Starting Sept 2018 but have some time off until then. Looking to try and see if I can get the name of the textbooks that LSE use to teach each first year unit to read ahead a bit.

Any other suggestions to prepare etc also appreciated. Cheers
Cant you just contact the Law department.

Alternatively just get some Law Express revision books and use them as intros.

It should say on the website what modules you will be doing, but most Lae degrees cover the same core subjects in the first two years.

Contract, Tort, Criminal, Constitutional, Land, Equity.
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username1628823
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(Original post by lawboi98)
Starting Sept 2018 but have some time off until then. Looking to try and see if I can get the name of the textbooks that LSE use to teach each first year unit to read ahead a bit.

Any other suggestions to prepare etc also appreciated. Cheers
Hi, I've just finished first year at the LSE.

As previously said, you might be better off emailing the department. Don't go buying anything and then coming back to me in MT saying that the textbooks have changed.

Criminal - BE CAREFUL, this depends on the teacher. Most students will use Ashworth's Principles of Criminal Law. However, others might use Smith and Hogan's Texts, Cases, and Materials by Karl Laird and Ormerod

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Smith-Hogan...EJBDE04XSAS1FA

Contract - all students this year used McKendrick's book on contract law. This textbook is really great, aside from not covering the topic of undue influence, duress etc well.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Contract-La...XX8YY28RSF4YS8

Tort - students were given a choice this year between two textbooks. I chose McBridge and Bagshaw's book, whereas you could also go for Lumney and Oliphant's Texts, Cases, and Materials. I thought McBride's book was good, and personally I preferred it to Lumney's. I'll briefly explain the difference between Texts, Cases and Mats books at the end.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Tort-Law-Lo...59ZJEP6E2K01PR

Public - we used two books for this course, one was used only really for the first part of the course in MT (it's written by the lecturer for MT, the great Martin Loughlin. It's worth adding here that lots of our textbooks are written by our lecturers and class teachers). The main textbook was a Texts, Cases Mats by Murkens and ors.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Public-Law-Text-Cases-Materials/dp/0198735383/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_14_t_0
_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=4ETG 63Q08RTNATQ7RSRZ

ILS - we used a textbook, but in my opinion this one was not worth buying. I did not refer to it all year, except when it was in the specified readings. Even then, I didn't pay much attention because you can't really cite the textbook in your exams anyway.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/English-Leg...F99BKDMX353P3Y

If you want, I can sell you the public and ILS ones for a decent price.

The difference between Texts, Cases, and Materials books and regular textbooks is that the TCM ones have extracts from judgements and academic writing. Regular textbooks tend not to. It's all a matter of preference; personally, I am not keen on TCM books but they can be more helpful than poorly-written/reference regular textbooks.

All the best.
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999tigger
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Very helpful post there.

Only other thing is you should ensure you get the latest edition.

Personally I wouldnt o mad and think full textbooks can be a bit dense, until you know what you are looking for.
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LeapingLucy
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Once you get to campus, you'll find plenty of second years trying to sell their textbooks cheaply, so don't waste your money splashing out on new copies now.
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Notoriety
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(Original post by Jasaron)
The difference between Texts, Cases, and Materials books and regular textbooks is that the TCM ones have extracts from judgements and academic writing. Regular textbooks tend not to. It's all a matter of preference; personally, I am not keen on TCM books but they can be more helpful than poorly-written/reference regular textbooks.
Agreed. I thought you'd be told to read them in conjunction with a regular textbook? I don't find them particularly useful, mainly because the top law reports will point out the relevant paras to read. You can get a better handle on a judgment when you're navigating it yourself. And they do tend to be written in an incomplete style! Must better to create your own materials pdf.
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username1628823
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(Original post by Notoriety)
Agreed. I thought you'd be told to read them in conjunction with a regular textbook? I don't find them particularly useful, mainly because the top law reports will point out the relevant paras to read. You can get a better handle on a judgment when you're navigating it yourself. And they do tend to be written in an incomplete style! Must better to create your own materials pdf.
I agree; I've found that I got a lot more out of cases when I tried to figure out the important bits myself and had to follow judges' reasoning in order to figure out how to do so. We're generally told to read cases and the relevant textbooks, so whether or not we use a TCM book should be irrelevant in theory.
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lawstudent048381
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Thanks all those who replied with all the helpful info!
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dina.yasmin
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(Original post by Jasaron)
Hi, I've just finished first year at the LSE.

As previously said, you might be better off emailing the department. Don't go buying anything and then coming back to me in MT saying that the textbooks have changed.

Criminal - BE CAREFUL, this depends on the teacher. Most students will use Ashworth's Principles of Criminal Law. However, others might use Smith and Hogan's Texts, Cases, and Materials by Karl Laird and Ormerod

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Smith-Hogan...EJBDE04XSAS1FA

Contract - all students this year used McKendrick's book on contract law. This textbook is really great, aside from not covering the topic of undue influence, duress etc well.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Contract-La...XX8YY28RSF4YS8

Tort - students were given a choice this year between two textbooks. I chose McBridge and Bagshaw's book, whereas you could also go for Lumney and Oliphant's Texts, Cases, and Materials. I thought McBride's book was good, and personally I preferred it to Lumney's. I'll briefly explain the difference between Texts, Cases and Mats books at the end.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Tort-Law-Lo...59ZJEP6E2K01PR

Public - we used two books for this course, one was used only really for the first part of the course in MT (it's written by the lecturer for MT, the great Martin Loughlin. It's worth adding here that lots of our textbooks are written by our lecturers and class teachers). The main textbook was a Texts, Cases Mats by Murkens and ors.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Public-Law-Text-Cases-Materials/dp/0198735383/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_14_t_0
_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=4ETG 63Q08RTNATQ7RSRZ

ILS - we used a textbook, but in my opinion this one was not worth buying. I did not refer to it all year, except when it was in the specified readings. Even then, I didn't pay much attention because you can't really cite the textbook in your exams anyway.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/English-Leg...F99BKDMX353P3Y

If you want, I can sell you the public and ILS ones for a decent price.

The difference between Texts, Cases, and Materials books and regular textbooks is that the TCM ones have extracts from judgements and academic writing. Regular textbooks tend not to. It's all a matter of preference; personally, I am not keen on TCM books but they can be more helpful than poorly-written/reference regular textbooks.

All the best.
Hi there!

Can you tell me about your first year experience of studying Law at LSE? I would appreciate the detail as I've always wanted to study Law there. Thanks!
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