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Why is cultural appropriation offensive? watch

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    every time i think i understand it it pops back up in the media - "so-and-so has been accused of cultural appropriation". this has led me to doubt my own definition of it so is there something i'm not getting here? or is it literally just borrowing elements from other cultures.
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    (Original post by JDTJDM)
    every time i think i understand it it pops back up in the media - "so-and-so has been accused of cultural appropriation". this has led me to doubt my own definition of it so is there something i'm not getting here? or is it literally just borrowing elements from other cultures.
    I'm slightly confused too, and I'm probably just ignorant of something here. I would have thought that if someone from another culture wanted to wear something / use something that comes from your culture in a positive way, then that's good, right? Surely that means your culture is bringing joy and happiness to others and that's good, right? I can understand it if someone is, say, wearing an item of clothing in a mocking way or designed to cause humour, but if just to use a part of culture for happiness and making life more enjoyable (not for mocking or anything) then is that not good that your culture is making another person happy?

    If I'm totally wrong I'd really like if someone could explain to me why it is so offensive to seemingly so many people, because I'm genuinely confused as well as the OP.
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    (Original post by DrawTheLine)
    I'm slightly confused too, and I'm probably just ignorant of something here. I would have thought that if someone from another culture wanted to wear something / use something that comes from your culture in a positive way, then that's good, right? Surely that means your culture is bringing joy and happiness to others and that's good, right? I can understand it if someone is, say, wearing an item of clothing in a mocking way or designed to cause humour, but if just to use a part of culture for happiness and making life more enjoyable (not for mocking or anything) then is that not good that your culture is making another person happy?

    If I'm totally wrong I'd really like if someone could explain to me why it is so offensive to seemingly so many people, because I'm genuinely confused as well as the OP.
    i feel the exact same
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    It's just another attempt by the left to control people.
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    I didn't even know this was an offense wth :zomg: how could it be
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    Just the snowflake generation finding yet another thing to be outraged about.
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    :rolleyes:
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    I think it depends on the context. Such as certain black hairstyles have become mainstream and have been completely rebranded which is a better example of cultural appropriation. Taking something from a culture which may have had negative connotations to it and re-branding it in a positive light without referencing where it came from. Things like having dreadlocks (I'm aware it isn't linked to one specific group) or wearing kimonos aren't good examples and would be more fitting as cultural appreciation.
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    (Original post by JDTJDM)
    every time i think i understand it it pops back up in the media - "so-and-so has been accused of cultural appropriation". this has led me to doubt my own definition of it so is there something i'm not getting here? or is it literally just borrowing elements from other cultures.
    It is literally just borrowing elements from other cultures. It's a concept that appears to have originated amongst the on-trend PC youth in America, of all places -- you know, the extremely successful 'melting pot'.

    It's stupid kids looking desperately for an injustice to rail against. Not one of them has ever given the matter any serious thought.

    By way of example, there was a recent instance of a girl wearing a Chinese-style prom dress in America. Some Chinese-American twitter user found this outrageous, on the basis that he, as a born American citizen whom I doubt had spent anything approaching a significant amount of time in China, personally owned that culture. It is the combined effect of boredom and a social media driven fad. Meanwhile, actual Chinese people collectively did not give a ****. Source on that: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/02/w...rom-dress.html
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    Because people need to whine and have some "injustice" they can sanctimoniously rail against.

    Cultures don't usually exist or develop in vacuums. Arts, fashions and traditions bleed between boundaries and are widely imported and exported over time. Therefore, to complain when a person from X culture wears are does something from Y culture demonstrates an ignorance of the nature of culture itself.

    It's worse when race gets involved, as though certain people (typically whites) should be restricted to wearing or doing certain things because of the skin they were born in. Meanwhile, an American black person is somehow allowed access to African culture, despite probably never having been to Africa and having no connection to the continent other than through distant ancestry. Again, this is by mere circumstance of their birth and nothing they have earned or created personally. It's nonsensical, discriminatory, and unfair.
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    A black woman with long blonde straight hair
    Is that not "cultural appropriation", too? Or does it get a pass because the wearer is non-white?
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    It's mostly a right-wing media initiative to seek out objectors and give them coverage as if they are representative of some 'snowflake' or 'political correctness' epidemic. Not quite fake news but almost.
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    please don't let the media play you on this. no one cares about 'cultural appropriation' (in most cases). we know this because the most liberal pop stars do it all the time (Beyonce, Rihanna, Madonna, Katy Perry, Lady Gaga, the entire Met Gala). the clue is when the media says 'people' are offended; that means five people on twitter and that's not 'people', that's a made-up story.
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    Spoiler:
    Show

    its not
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    Some people think that cultural appropriation is offensive because they feel it's unjust that one race or whatnot of people can get praised for X thing, while another gets slammed for it. Personally, I feel that as long as the person wearing or doing whatever isn't personally being disrespectful and is aware of where X is coming from, it shouldn't be an issue.
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    (Original post by RivalPlayer)
    A black woman with long blonde straight hair
    Is that not "cultural appropriation", too? Or does it get a pass because the wearer is non-white?
    Except we are referred to as ‘unkempt and unprofessional’ when we have our natural hair out. Often, black women feel compelled to wear more ‘European’ hairstyles to appear more desirable in those kind of interactions, which is different to a white woman choosing to wear bantu knots, cornrows, afro’s etc.
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    (Original post by RivalPlayer)
    A black woman with long blonde straight hair
    Is that not "cultural appropriation", too? Or does it get a pass because the wearer is non-white?
    I don't think that's a culture though. Black hair styles such as cornrows or bantu knots do have a cultural link to them though. (Anyone can wear these hairstyles just to add).
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    I have no idea why this made up bs is. You hear a new term every month. People need to get a grip and stop being such attention seeking snowflakes.
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    Except we are referred to as ‘unkempt and unprofessional’ when we have our natural hair out. Often, black women feel compelled to wear more ‘European’ hairstyles to appear more desirable in those kind of interactions, which is different to a white woman choosing to wear bantu knots, cornrows, afro’s etc.
    I'm white. If I just let my hair grow out naturally, I'd look like a scruffy caveman. That's not exactly a professional look.

    In a business environment, people are expected to look neat and tidy. People with naturally messy hair will obviously have to put a bit more work into it, but it's just something you have to deal with. Big, fuzzy afros and dreadlocks are not business-friendly looks. Keep it short or tie it back. It doesn't have to be "European" but simply controlled and conservative, as is expected of all of us.
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    Because certain individuals deem it so. Minorities have become tribalistic and xenophobic which is very ironic.

    What the hell am I supposed to do? I'm half Brit, half-Nigerian lol.
 
 
 

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