A levels now test ones intelligence. Watch

peanotto
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Before people used to say that hard work was all that was needed to do well in A levels, and of course maybe a bit of intelligence.

However, recently there has been changes in exams. Instead of pure repetition of questions which can be done through rote learning, exams have started to test a student on their ability to apply knowledge. This is very relevant for Maths, where you may have to apply several concepts into one question.

This way, the examiner can determine the students true understanding of concepts by reviewing their ability to apply many key concepts, rather than just answer questions based on knowledge only.

Therefore, people may think to succeed in A levels, you must equally have intelligence and be able to work hard

Do you think A levels have started to focus more on the intelligence of students? Maybe intelligence may soon be a more important role in succeeding in A levels rather than work ethic. What do you think?
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username2752874
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(Original post by peanotto)
Before people used to say that hard work was all that was needed to do well in A levels, and of course maybe a bit of intelligence.

However, recently there has been changes in exams. Instead of pure repetition of questions which can be done through rote learning, exams have started to test a student on their ability to apply knowledge. This is very relevant for Maths, where you may have to apply several concepts into one question.

This way, the examiner can determine the students true understanding of concepts by reviewing their ability to apply many key concepts, rather than just answer questions based on knowledge only.

Therefore, people may think to succeed in A levels, you must equally have intelligence and be able to work hard

Do you think A levels have started to focus more on the intelligence of students? Maybe intelligence may soon be a more important role in succeeding in A levels rather than work ethic. What do you think?
No m9. The grade boundaries are gonna plummet to adjust to the new difficulty. My exams went down to the 50% raw mark region for an A for crying out loud. The exams themselves will require more thought - but the grading will all be the same.

This argument would make more sense to Oxbridge/Imperial admissions tests, along with something like the UKCAT
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lionike123
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Maths has definitely got harder. For Biology it is mostly memorisation testing your memory.
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peanotto
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(Original post by Kyber Ninja)
No m9. The grade boundaries are gonna plummet to adjust to the new difficulty. My exams went down to the 50% raw mark region for an A for crying out loud. The exams themselves will require more thought - but the grading will all be the same.

This argument would make more sense to Oxbridge/Imperial admissions tests, along with something like the UKCAT
Hm I guess it would be more applicable for University admission tests. The new system of difficulty might cause students to become even more intelligent
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Hello1236969
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are you talking about the new 2017 a-levels?

if you are, i swear its more about memory cos you have to remember content over 2 years.

if your talking about subjects like maths well then yes. but alevel maths has always required application of concepts
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peanotto
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(Original post by Hello1236969)
are you talking about the new 2017 a-levels?

if you are, i swear its more about memory cos you have to remember content over 2 years.

if your talking about subjects like maths well then yes. but alevel maths has always required application of concepts
All a levels currently in general.
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Hello1236969
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(Original post by peanotto)
All a levels currently in general.
what a levels you do?
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Hello1236969
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for me, gcses were just memory, apart from computing/ bio/chem/physics which required application & so i did like 1/2 past papers for those subjects.

For a-level, yes theres alot of application and using your knowledge to solve problems. Especially for me cos i do maths and economics.
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peanotto
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(Original post by Hello1236969)
for me, gcses were just memory, apart from computing/ bio/chem/physics which required application & so i did like 1/2 past papers for those subjects.

For a-level, yes theres alot of application and using your knowledge to solve problems. Especially for me cos i do maths and economics.
i do maths and economics aswell. ive also noticed how easy gcses were which barely involved any application except my additional maths gcse. the application in gcse was alot more simple. Economics application isnt too difficult its just based on the extract and maybe some past knowledge. Maths application i would say is alot harder
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WereWolf_Engine
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(Original post by Kyber Ninja)
No m9. The grade boundaries are gonna plummet to adjust to the new difficulty. My exams went down to the 50% raw mark region for an A for crying out loud. The exams themselves will require more thought - but the grading will all be the same.

This argument would make more sense to Oxbridge/Imperial admissions tests, along with something like the UKCAT
which subject was 50% for an A though??? that sounds absolutely mental! also was this the final exam or just a mock test for the class? becuz that would explain the 50%
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ricooo54
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(Original post by peanotto)
Before people used to say that hard work was all that was needed to do well in A levels, and of course maybe a bit of intelligence.

However, recently there has been changes in exams. Instead of pure repetition of questions which can be done through rote learning, exams have started to test a student on their ability to apply knowledge. This is very relevant for Maths, where you may have to apply several concepts into one question.

This way, the examiner can determine the students true understanding of concepts by reviewing their ability to apply many key concepts, rather than just answer questions based on knowledge only.

Therefore, people may think to succeed in A levels, you must equally have intelligence and be able to work hard

Do you think A levels have started to focus more on the intelligence of students? Maybe intelligence may soon be a more important role in succeeding in A levels rather than work ethic. What do you think?
Do kinda agree with you. A levels are not about hard work anymore. I know people who work really hard for maths for example but really underperform when it comes the actual exam. Questions aren't so clear cut anymore. Its unfair to those who actually try really hard and then you get a 'smart' guy who does minimal work and gets higher than those who try so hard. By smart I mean someone who understands what the question is asking. Pros and cons to this system but imo at least its time a levels got reworked. Times are changing and the education system must change along with it.
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username3972914
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For the new specification for Mathematics and Further Mathematics, all you have to do is read the exam board endorsed textbook, follow the examples in said textbook (if you still don't understand the concept, you have plenty of resources available - classmates; teachers; the internet...), and do all the questions in the textbook. Once you've done that, find more questions, especially exam-style questions or difficult questions that push your understanding. CGP has recently published their exam practice workbook for both of those subjects and PhysicsAndMathsTutor has questions banks.

And, the way you should do these questions is by creating a constant feedback loop.

Step one: attempt question.
Step two: look at the answer.

If you fail, do it again.

If you fail again, do it again.

And you keep doing it until you're sick and tired of it.

Step four: look at the worked solution.
Step five: if you failed to correctly answer the question beforehand, reattempt the question without looking at the worked solution. If you have correctly answered the question, readjust your solution to look more like their solution or redo it the way they have. Even if you have the correct answer, the worked solution may give you a quicker way to do it or one where it's easier for the examiner to give you marks.
Step six: repeat.

That's how I revise those subject and I've been coming out with as and bs when I give a **** (and I generally give a ****).

Have you noticed something? It's still rote-learning!

Spoiler:
Show

Whenever you have exams coming up and you've ran out of past papers to do (and you will ran out because it's the new specification), create one yourself filled with questions that you lack confidence on.
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username2752874
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(Original post by WereWolf_Engine)
which subject was 50% for an A though??? that sounds absolutely mental! also was this the final exam or just a mock test for the class? becuz that would explain the 50%
These were actual AS and A2 exams for WJEC for Biology and Chemistry

This is what one of the A2 Biology papers looked like
http://pastpapers.download.wjec.co.uk/s17-2408-01.pdf

hardest thing I've ever done in my life
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peanotto
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(Original post by randint)
For the new specification for Mathematics and Further Mathematics, all you have to do is read the exam board endorsed textbook, follow the examples in said textbook (if you still don't understand the concept, you have plenty of resources available - classmates; teachers; the internet...), and do all the questions in the textbook. Once you've done that, find more questions, especially exam-style questions or difficult questions that push your understanding. CGP has recently published their exam practice workbook for both of those subjects and PhysicsAndMathsTutor has questions banks.

And, the way you should do these questions is by creating a constant feedback loop.

Step one: attempt question.
Step two: look at the answer.

If you fail, do it again.

If you fail again, do it again.

And you keep doing it until you're sick and tired of it.

Step four: look at the worked solution.
Step five: if you failed to correctly answer the question beforehand, reattempt the question without looking at the worked solution. If you have correctly answered the question, readjust your solution to look more like their solution or redo it the way they have. Even if you have the correct answer, the worked solution may give you a quicker way to do it or one where it's easier for the examiner to give you marks.
Step six: repeat.

That's how I revise those subject and I've been coming out with as and bs when I give a **** (and I generally give a ****).

Have you noticed something? It's still rote-learning!

Spoiler:
Show


Whenever you have exams coming up and you've ran out of past papers to do (and you will ran out because it's the new specification), create one yourself filled with questions that you lack confidence on.

yes but in the time youve finished learning that concept by tedious rote learning, a more intelligent student has already moved on to the next topic, with full understanding of the previous one.

that is the distinction between intelligence and work ethic. also you havent mentioned any reference to the application of knowledge. when you rote learn, you dont 'learn' how to apply different concepts. Your ability to understand several concepts and apply them are linked to intelligence, no?
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Bulletzone
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A-levels definitely now want you to apply your knowledge a lot more, but if you think about it. The lack of questions and exposure to such application of our knowledge would surely mean we won't adapt to the level of questions we're expected to answer.
This definitely highlights the people who have a natural gift in deciphering a question based solely on what they know.

Give it 4-5 years and watch all the grade boundaries go up.
Why?
There shall be so many past papers available that a pattern shall soon be noticed. It's inevitable.
You know the saying, "Practice makes perfect"? That much will be true down the line when more past papers are available.


TLDR:

Lack of papers means only "Intelligent people" shall pass.
When more papers are available, loads more people shall be passing.





One question I ask you op, Is "Intelligent" really the word you should be using as you're slightly suggesting you can measure intelligence...
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shameful_burrito
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Same happened in Scotland with the New Higher/Advance Higher and the National 5’s
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RubesACline
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(Original post by peanotto)
Hm I guess it would be more applicable for University admission tests. The new system of difficulty might cause students to become even more intelligent
I have a feeling that you're mixing intelligence with application here. You can't 'become more intelligent', I'm afraid - even if some of us want to! - and if A-levels were based on intelligence, that would be incredibly unfair to those who have worked hard but aren't necessarily intelligent.

Personally, I think the new A-levels are mostly less based on memorisation, definitely, and are more based on application. However, you can learn application by doing practice tests and reading mark schemes - still not based on intelligence.
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j.woods
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I really hate th changes they've made to the exams! I do maths at AS level and the questions they gave us for the new spec (very first paper) was absolutely ridiculous! almost everyone came out crying! I think they need to make an optional exam for he really advanced ones if they want a challenge and give people who are just aiming for a C a chance to pass, that way even if they don't do well it won effect their A level grades but is something more to add to their CV
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Nihilisticb*tch
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It is more important that exams test your natural ability at that subject as well as your hard work. The whole point of exams is to show universities and/or employers that you have a certain level of ability in a subject. Having all that knowledge is useless if you dont truly understand it or you cant apply it jn a real world situation. When you get a job in said subject youre not going to be able to wrote learn every possible situation that may arise. Youre going to have to apply it
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04MR17
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Depends what you mean by intelligence.

The people who do well in A Levels are the people who are good at taking exams. That has very little to do with intelligence explicitly.
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