GCSE chemistry fuel cells, help!!

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CharisHeaven
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#1
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I was revising fuel cells and in the aqa revision guide it says that at the negative electrode hydrogen loses electrons.
How does this work, surely at the negative electrode they should gain electrons???
Please help, I'm so confused!!
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EdexcelAreIdiots
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(Original post by CharisHeaven)
I was revising fuel cells and in the aqa revision guide it says that at the negative electrode hydrogen loses electrons.
How does this work, surely at the negative electrode they should gain electrons???
Please help, I'm so confused!!
H2(g) – 2e– → 2H+(aq)
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Kian Stevens
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(Original post by CharisHeaven)
I was revising fuel cells and in the aqa revision guide it says that at the negative electrode hydrogen loses electrons.
How does this work, surely at the negative electrode they should gain electrons???
Please help, I'm so confused!!
Hydrogen is oxidised (loses electrons), so obviously that electrode will become more negatively charged, since electrons are being released into it. It's this oxidation which causes the electrode to become negative.

Don't forget that H2 <-> 2H+ + 2e- - electrons are released during hydrogen's oxidation.
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CharisHeaven
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Awesome thank you so much
(Original post by Kian Stevens)
Hydrogen is oxidised (loses electrons), so obviously that electrode will become more negatively charged, since electrons are being released into it. It's this oxidation which causes the electrode to become negative.

Don't forget that H2 <-> 2H+ + 2e- - electrons are released during hydrogen's oxidation.
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