Language form structure Watch

Lollypop3860
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Can anyone please give me a list of techniques that would fall in to each of these categories?

Thanks
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a mind at work
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Hey! I did GCSE AQA English Lit and Lang last year and got two Grade 9s, here's what I looked at for each of those:

Form

-Easiest for poetry, for example, Charge of the Light Brigade by Alfred Lord Tennyson can be viewed as a ballad, My Last Duchess by Robert Browning is a dramatic monologue, and Ozymandias by Percy Bysshe Shelley is a petrarchian sonnet.
-However, you can also pick up points for talking about genre (some say this is technically a language point, and they're not necessarily wrong, but I've checked BBC bitesize and it recommends use of this as a form point.) So, for example, Macbeth is a tragedy, and Jekyll and Hyde is a gothic novel.
-You don't have to write a whole paragaph on form!! Weave it into your essay, and make sure you relate it back to the question. If you can identify a point where the form is subverted that might warrant a whole paragraph, and if you're comparing two poems with very different forms, again, you could probably fill a paragraph comparing how their forms impact how the theme you're asked about is dealt with.
-Don't worry about form in your language exam, the examiner will understand you can't pick up form marks here.

Structure

-This can be harder than form, but a great way to deal with this is to google and learn Freytag's Pyramid. think about how your set texts are structured around it.
-You can also apply this in your language exam!! E.g. "According to Gustav Freytag's pyramid, this extract is taken from the exposition of the text, meaning it would typically be exciting, x, and y, this is seen through/subverted when..this might be because..." etc etc.
-You can also talk about structural placement of words and phrases for top bands. For example, in An Inspector Calls, Mr Birling talks about how capitalist ideals > socialist ideals almost directly after confidently denouncing claims about a war or the sinking of the Titanic, Priestly's organised this structurally to make the audience think Birling is, again, incorrect.
-Don't forget repetition is technically also a structural technique!
-You can also use things like metre, e.g trochaic tetrameter for The Charge Of The Light Brigade, iambic pentameter for Shakespeare (don't just state this unless you've got a reason for it, e.g. It's broken at certain points, iambic pentameter is pretty standard so it doesn't look as fancy mentioning it as people think). Think about moments where the rhyme scheme is broken, or caesurae etc etc.
-Think about why they've decided to end and begin and extract in that particular place, they have their reasons, and this is a good thing to talk about.

Language

-So these are just your standard techniques like, metaphors, similies, personification etc. This is what most students score highly on and find easy, so starting with a structural point will help.

Finally: Mr Salles and Mr Bruff on YouTube are amazing on this, even if they don't focus on your exam board it'd still be shrewd to check out their channels.

Hope that helped and let me know if you have any other questions!

Izz
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Lollypop3860
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(Original post by a mind at work)
Hey! I did GCSE AQA English Lit and Lang last year and got two Grade 9s, here's what I looked at for each of those:

Form

-Easiest for poetry, for example, Charge of the Light Brigade by Alfred Lord Tennyson can be viewed as a ballad, My Last Duchess by Robert Browning is a dramatic monologue, and Ozymandias by Percy Bysshe Shelley is a petrarchian sonnet.
-However, you can also pick up points for talking about genre (some say this is technically a language point, and they're not necessarily wrong, but I've checked BBC bitesize and it recommends use of this as a form point.) So, for example, Macbeth is a tragedy, and Jekyll and Hyde is a gothic novel.
-You don't have to write a whole paragaph on form!! Weave it into your essay, and make sure you relate it back to the question. If you can identify a point where the form is subverted that might warrant a whole paragraph, and if you're comparing two poems with very different forms, again, you could probably fill a paragraph comparing how their forms impact how the theme you're asked about is dealt with.
-Don't worry about form in your language exam, the examiner will understand you can't pick up form marks here.

Structure

-This can be harder than form, but a great way to deal with this is to google and learn Freytag's Pyramid. think about how your set texts are structured around it.
-You can also apply this in your language exam!! E.g. "According to Gustav Freytag's pyramid, this extract is taken from the exposition of the text, meaning it would typically be exciting, x, and y, this is seen through/subverted when..this might be because..." etc etc.
-You can also talk about structural placement of words and phrases for top bands. For example, in An Inspector Calls, Mr Birling talks about how capitalist ideals > socialist ideals almost directly after confidently denouncing claims about a war or the sinking of the Titanic, Priestly's organised this structurally to make the audience think Birling is, again, incorrect.
-Don't forget repetition is technically also a structural technique!
-You can also use things like metre, e.g trochaic tetrameter for The Charge Of The Light Brigade, iambic pentameter for Shakespeare (don't just state this unless you've got a reason for it, e.g. It's broken at certain points, iambic pentameter is pretty standard so it doesn't look as fancy mentioning it as people think). Think about moments where the rhyme scheme is broken, or caesurae etc etc.
-Think about why they've decided to end and begin and extract in that particular place, they have their reasons, and this is a good thing to talk about.

Language

-So these are just your standard techniques like, metaphors, similies, personification etc. This is what most students score highly on and find easy, so starting with a structural point will help.

Finally: Mr Salles and Mr Bruff on YouTube are amazing on this, even if they don't focus on your exam board it'd still be shrewd to check out their channels.

Hope that helped and let me know if you have any other questions!

Izz

Thank you so much this was great xx
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a mind at work
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(Original post by Lollypop3860)
Thank you so much this was great xx
No problem! Glad I could help and best of luck ((:
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