Freedom physics
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Is charge a quantity? What defines a quantity (I don't think Google answers this clearly 😄)
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Eimmanuel
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(Original post by Freedom physics)
Is charge a quantity? What defines a quantity (I don't think Google answers this clearly 😄)
Are you asking about physical quantity or just quantity?
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Freedom physics
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Quantity 🙂
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Eimmanuel
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(Original post by Freedom physics)
Is charge a quantity? What defines a quantity (I don't think Google answers this clearly 😄)
(Original post by Freedom physics)
Quantity 🙂
Is the question "Is charge a quantity?" an exam question or your own question?
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Freedom physics
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Both 😂🙂
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Eimmanuel
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(Original post by Freedom physics)
Both 😂🙂
Can you quote the paper from the examination board?
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Freedom physics
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Don't know and I've lost the question! Sorry! 🙂
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stephen1011
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(Original post by Freedom physics)
Is charge a quantity? What defines a quantity (I don't think Google answers this clearly 😄)
A Charge is an analogue of mass.
There are 7 base quantities:

  • Length (meter)
  • Mass (kilogram)
  • Time (second)
  • Electric current (ampere)
  • Thermodynamic temperature (kelvin)
  • Amount of substance (mole)
  • Luminous intensity (candela)


charge is not a base quantity, however, to exactly know what a charge is, we need to go into deeper physics.

Read one of Feynman's lecture on charge, but I don't know what level you want to go into.

http://www.feynmanlectures.caltech.edu/II_28.html
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Eimmanuel
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(Original post by Freedom physics)
Is charge a quantity? What defines a quantity (I don't think Google answers this clearly 😄)
(Original post by Eimmanuel)
Is the question "Is charge a quantity?" an exam question or your own question?
(Original post by Freedom physics)
Both 😂🙂
It seems that when you ask in the forum, you don't like to provide the context of the question or at least some background on what you are confused about.

When you mention that "I don't think Google answers this clearly", I would not be surprised that you are not getting a satisfying. To get a satisfying answer(s), you need to "really" understand what you are trying to ask or is it a valid question.

(Original post by Eimmanuel)
Can you quote the paper from the examination board?
(Original post by Freedom physics)
Don't know and I've lost the question! Sorry! 🙂
I really hope none of the examination boards would ask "Is charge a quantity?" in a physics paper. However, I am not be surprised to find such question in endorsed physics textbook.

(IMO)The question (Is charge a quantity?) is an ambiguous question because as far as I know there are two quantities that one can encounter in physics - physical quantity and mathematical quantity. It is the former that that A level physics students tends to focus on.

Which is why I clarified by asking the following question
(Original post by Eimmanuel)
Are you asking about physical quantity or just quantity?
It seems that quantity in the question implies physical quantity. (IMO) A clearer question would be "Is charge a physical quantity?" Some teachers may argue that there is no need to add the word physical because in physics, we are mainly concerned on physical quantities.

If you look into the link, I believe it would answer your question.

You should make it a habit to explain your thought or with a bit of context or a background info of how question come to your mind. This is to aid the helper to explain thing that focus on clearing your doubts. Writing the problem in a detail manner can also help you better understand the problem in your mind. Quite a number of OP seems to be able to answer their own question after writing the question in a detailed manner.
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Freedom physics
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(Original post by Eimmanuel)
It seems that when you ask in the forum, you don't like to provide the context of the question or at least some background on what you are confused about.

When you mention that "I don't think Google answers this clearly", I would not be surprised that you are not getting a satisfying. To get a satisfying answer(s), you need to "really" understand what you are trying to ask or is it a valid question.





I really hope none of the examination boards would ask "Is charge a quantity?" in a physics paper. However, I am not be surprised to find such question in endorsed physics textbook.

(IMO)The question (Is charge a quantity?) is an ambiguous question because as far as I know there are two quantities that one can encounter in physics - physical quantity and mathematical quantity. It is the former that that A level physics students tends to focus on.

Which is why I clarified by asking the following question



It seems that quantity in the question implies physical quantity. (IMO) A clearer question would be "Is charge a physical quantity?" Some teachers may argue that there is no need to add the word physical because in physics, we are mainly concerned on physical quantities.

If you look into the link, I believe it would answer your question.

You should make it a habit to explain your thought or with a bit of context or a background info of how question come to your mind. This is to aid the helper to explain thing that focus on clearing your doubts. Writing the problem in a detail manner can also help you better understand the problem in your mind. Quite a number of OP seems to be able to answer their own question after writing the question in a detailed manner.
Ok, thanks! Will do! Also, sorry if I've annoyed anyone by a lack of explanation of a question
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