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    The National Grid ensures that fossil fuel power stations in the UK only produce about 33% of the total electricity they could produce when operating at a maximum output. Suggest two reasons why.

    REALLY CONFUSED CAN ANYONE HELP?
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    (Original post by razzy02)
    The National Grid ensures that fossil fuel power stations in the UK only produce about 33% of the total electricity they could produce when operating at a maximum output. Suggest two reasons why.

    REALLY CONFUSED CAN ANYONE HELP?
    There are two obvious answers that should spring to mind:

    a) Limiting greenhouse gas and air pollutant emissions: Fossil fuel combustion produces greenhouse gases and other air pollutants. They significantly contribute to global warming and climate change, as well as causing fogs/smog s in populous areas which result in poor air quality and respiratory diseases etc. Limiting their output places a control on the amount of pollution fossil fuelled power stations can produce at that location.

    b) Compensating for power output fluctuations caused by the physical limitations of renewable wind and solar sources:
    The remaining national power demand is satisfied from renewable and clean air sources - wind, solar, nuclear, hydroelectric, geothermal. However, wind and solar power are dependent on weather and seasonal conditions (solar cannot generate without light or at night for instance) and are unable to produce electricity continuously. Demand is met through the deliberate excess capacity of fossil fuel and nuclear power stations, whose output can be increased temporarily to compensate for the fluctuations in output capacity from renewable sources.
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    Yeah there's no 'physics' reason for 33%, it's a 'science in society' type question...

    IMO might also make a point about energy security - fossil fuels are mainly imported so reducing their use means we're less vulnerable to being threatened by some of the dodgy regimes exporting fossil fuels.

    e.g. https://www.telegraph.co.uk/politics...eline-germany/
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    (Original post by razzy02)
    The National Grid ensures that fossil fuel power stations in the UK only produce about 33% of the total electricity they could produce when operating at a maximum output. Suggest two reasons why.

    REALLY CONFUSED CAN ANYONE HELP?
    For these type of questions, do not think of just physics, just use your common sense such as "what is wrong with fossil fuels?" then the answer should spring to mind.
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    tbh dont listen to the million word answers that people are saying to u:

    Easy answers are:
    - Most renewable energy resources are unreliable, so we have non-renewable energy for quick energy in times of high-demand
    - Fossil fuels are a finite resource and can run out
    - To reduce greenhouse gas emissions//To contribute less to climate change.
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    (Original post by SeanClark)
    tbh dont listen to the million word answers that people are saying to u:

    Easy answers are:
    - Most renewable energy resources are unreliable, so we have non-renewable energy for quick energy in times of high-demand
    - Fossil fuels are a finite resource and can run out
    - To reduce greenhouse gas emissions//To contribute less to climate change.
    Tbh, don't try and be a smart arse by trashing other peoples help. It simply makes you look like a condescending, arrogant immature f***wit.
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    (Original post by uberteknik)
    Tbh, don't try and be a smart arse by trashing other peoples help. It simply makes you look like a condescending, arrogant immature f***wit.
    Says the person who’s ******** on a younger kid ahahahahahhaah. Ur help was stupid, who the **** puts over 2 paragraphs for a 2 mark question, ur answer was way to long and could confuse people, if u consider ur self a study helper u must give people **** grades ahhaha. And I’m not a “smart arse” Physics is my favourite subject and Ik how students can get confused from long winded stupid answers which are unneeded.
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    I think it's also important to note that power stations will want to save some power for when there is a peak, e.g. a time when people get home from work or school.

    The companies will be wasting lots of power if they operate at maximum output all the time.
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    (Original post by SeanClark)
    --snip--
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    (Original post by SeanClark)
    Says the person who’s ******** on a younger kid ahahahahahhaah. Ur help was stupid, who the **** puts over 2 paragraphs for a 2 mark question, ur answer was way to long and could confuse people, if u consider ur self a study helper u must give people **** grades ahhaha. And I’m not a “smart arse” Physics is my favourite subject and Ik how students can get confused from long winded stupid answers which are unneeded.
    I rest my case.
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    Its all to do about demand and supply, with a little bit of market intervention in.There is more Generation than demand even on the coldest day. This is more pronounced over summer. Therefore Generation will never be operating at 100%.Power stations have to go on outage to maintain their equipment.EU has limited amount of generation coming from coal power stations because its dirty.Wind gets big subsidies to generate and its free. Coal costs money to generate so if their is limited demand, coal will not generate as won't make enough money to cover costs. therefore coal just fills in the gaps when the wind isn't blowing or when its really cold
 
 
 
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