purplepainbow
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ways to revise?
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jamesgillian123
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google?
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PeterDick'ed
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I personally like smashing my head against my books - helps me absorb all the info... you know, through diffusion, from an area of high concentration to an area of low concentration. Hope it helps!
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reinainoue
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This was a post by an amazing Quora-ian.

First and foremost, you need to understand the structure of each of your academic subjects.

Generally, most academic subjects can be classified roughly as follows:

- concept-based, memory dependent: you have to remember an inordinate amount of facts, e.g. subjects like Geography, Biology, Economics, Medicine and Computer Science;

- problem-solving based: you have to do a lot of problem solving, and also putting theories, formulas, equations to work, e.g. subjects like Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, etc.

- interpretation/prediction-based: you have to make interpretations and predictions, e.g. subjects like Literature, History, and may include Economics, etc.

Nevertheless, there are also certain academic subjects that often cross or traverse over two or more categories, and may even require understanding of lab experiments and field work, like Biology, Economics, Medicine, and Computer Science (a lot of programming routines);

Once you have categorised them, you have to take note: do not study/revise concept-based subjects in one continuous stretch.

The most optimal time schedule per subject is two hours.

Let's say you have completed the study/revision of Biology for the first two hours. The next ideal subject to study/revise should be chosen from the problem-solving category, like Mathematics.

That's to say, you deliberately do a mix-up.

In total, it's advisable not to go for more than four hours in a day.

Also, for every two hours allocated to one subject, you need to break them up into four quadrants of time, with 25 minutes of studying/revision and 5 minutes of break in between.

A break means you pause, and use the time to do stretching, or get up and go to your kitchen to make a drink, or stand at the window to do some natural vision improvement exercises.

The rationale for such an initiative is for you to develop more primacy and recency effects in your study session.

What this means is that you have more opportunities to remember/recall what you are studying at the beginning and at the end of the session.

According to the study experts, this routine helps you to circumvent the infamous Ebbinghaus Effect or forgetting curve.

More importantly, for each subject, especially in the concept-based/memory-dependent category, you also need to segregate "core material" from "elaborative material".

"Core material" comprises key concepts, principles, theories, terminology, definitions, nomenclature, etc.

For History, names and events are also critical.

"Elaborative material" comprises examples, illustrations, anecdotes, etc.

The exam syllabus for each subject will help you to identify them.

Using the Pareto Principle: 80% of the exam questions often come from "core material", where you should put your primary focus during studying/revision.

This is not to say "elaborative material" is unimportant.

Once you have a good grasp of "core material", it's easy to have the "elaborative material" naturally fall in place in your memory banks.

If feasible, supplement your study/revision sessions with idea-maps or cluster diagrams or any web-based graphic organisers, as such organising and processing tools involve key words, images, pictures, and colours.

Henceforth, they are more likely to allow you to capture the big picture (or bird's eye view) as well as the details at one visual glance.

For enhanced study improvement, the use of index cards is useful in mastering, i.e. remembering, the multitude of definitions, nomenclatures and even key concepts, especially in subjects like Biology, Economics, Medicine and Computer Science.

I trust to have made my points very clear. Godspeed to you!

Here's the original link!
https://www.quora.com/Is-it-better-t...-studying-each
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anynonymous2
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It depends on the subject to be honest but here are some of the ways to revise:
-flashcards-if you are in year 11 then I guess its a bit too late for you to make flashcards but you can go on Quizlet and look at other people's cards and learn from them.
- Making notes- for subjects like English, it is the best to make notes as it enables you to include more details.
- mind maps- watch a video on say Genetics, and later try to mind map everything you remember and then re-watch the video and see if you have missed something off.
- making up songs or ways to remember things- this is good for subjects where you have to remember steps e.g Geography or Science. So try and make up weird mnemonics or some sort of story related to the thing you are trying to memorise.
- try and teach it yourself and record it- if you are running out of time or you need to revise for other subjects as well, give yourself a time limit and try and teach yourself the whole topic within that time and record yourself. Then, at night, when you go to sleep, hear the recording and this way it will help to make the information stick in your long term memory.
P.S. sorry for the long list but I hope it helps!
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username4000890
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#6
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Bruh i'm kinda shook i see Quora here ......
Do you use it alot ? Like are you part of the community there??
If you know you know but otherwise my question wont make sense and ignore it lol.
(Original post by reinainoue)
This was a post by an amazing Quora-ian.

First and foremost, you need to understand the structure of each of your academic subjects.

Generally, most academic subjects can be classified roughly as follows:

- concept-based, memory dependent: you have to remember an inordinate amount of facts, e.g. subjects like Geography, Biology, Economics, Medicine and Computer Science;

- problem-solving based: you have to do a lot of problem solving, and also putting theories, formulas, equations to work, e.g. subjects like Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, etc.

- interpretation/prediction-based: you have to make interpretations and predictions, e.g. subjects like Literature, History, and may include Economics, etc.

Nevertheless, there are also certain academic subjects that often cross or traverse over two or more categories, and may even require understanding of lab experiments and field work, like Biology, Economics, Medicine, and Computer Science (a lot of programming routines);

Once you have categorised them, you have to take note: do not study/revise concept-based subjects in one continuous stretch.

The most optimal time schedule per subject is two hours.

Let's say you have completed the study/revision of Biology for the first two hours. The next ideal subject to study/revise should be chosen from the problem-solving category, like Mathematics.

That's to say, you deliberately do a mix-up.

In total, it's advisable not to go for more than four hours in a day.

Also, for every two hours allocated to one subject, you need to break them up into four quadrants of time, with 25 minutes of studying/revision and 5 minutes of break in between.

A break means you pause, and use the time to do stretching, or get up and go to your kitchen to make a drink, or stand at the window to do some natural vision improvement exercises.

The rationale for such an initiative is for you to develop more primacy and recency effects in your study session.

What this means is that you have more opportunities to remember/recall what you are studying at the beginning and at the end of the session.

According to the study experts, this routine helps you to circumvent the infamous Ebbinghaus Effect or forgetting curve.

More importantly, for each subject, especially in the concept-based/memory-dependent category, you also need to segregate "core material" from "elaborative material".

"Core material" comprises key concepts, principles, theories, terminology, definitions, nomenclature, etc.

For History, names and events are also critical.

"Elaborative material" comprises examples, illustrations, anecdotes, etc.

The exam syllabus for each subject will help you to identify them.

Using the Pareto Principle: 80% of the exam questions often come from "core material", where you should put your primary focus during studying/revision.

This is not to say "elaborative material" is unimportant.

Once you have a good grasp of "core material", it's easy to have the "elaborative material" naturally fall in place in your memory banks.

If feasible, supplement your study/revision sessions with idea-maps or cluster diagrams or any web-based graphic organisers, as such organising and processing tools involve key words, images, pictures, and colours.

Henceforth, they are more likely to allow you to capture the big picture (or bird's eye view) as well as the details at one visual glance.

For enhanced study improvement, the use of index cards is useful in mastering, i.e. remembering, the multitude of definitions, nomenclatures and even key concepts, especially in subjects like Biology, Economics, Medicine and Computer Science.

I trust to have made my points very clear. Godspeed to you!

Here's the original link!
https://www.quora.com/Is-it-better-t...-studying-each
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reinainoue
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(Original post by blackrain)
Bruh i'm kinda shook i see Quora here ......
Do you use it alot ? Like are you part of the community there??
If you know you know but otherwise my question wont make sense and ignore it lol.
Haha ya I do! Quora’s really good for the times when you’re too lazy to research your own facts
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username4000890
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(Original post by reinainoue)
Haha ya I do! Quora’s really good for the times when you’re too lazy to research your own facts
Nope you didn't get what i mean.
Besides the academic side of Quora ( for searching facts and stuff ) there are people who use it as a writing platform and share stories about life kind of like blogs for some of them. There are also Top Writer awards given and followers and an up-vote system ( kind of like a rep system ) . Lots of teenagers are on there using it as a journal/rant-space/blog and some of the most "popular" writers there have thousands of followers ...
I used to be active there for a while but only had about 150 followers but became friends with a Korean guy on there and we still talk until now lol
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LarissaAlves
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I think this blog has really amazing tips on how to revise: http://www.learningscientists.org/bl...y=For+Students
Really worth reading the posts or listening to the podcast.

And there is also this one that is specific to how to create an effective revision timetable - also really relevant! https://www.kent-teach.com/Blog/post...-learning.aspx

To practice questions for the different exam boards, I suggest Seneca Learning https://senecalearning.com/


Good luck!
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reinainoue
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(Original post by blackrain)
Nope you didn't get what i mean.
Besides the academic side of Quora ( for searching facts and stuff ) there are people who use it as a writing platform and share stories about life kind of like blogs for some of them. There are also Top Writer awards given and followers and an up-vote system ( kind of like a rep system ) . Lots of teenagers are on there using it as a journal/rant-space/blog and some of the most "popular" writers there have thousands of followers ...
I used to be active there for a while but only had about 150 followers but became friends with a Korean guy on there and we still talk until now lol
Ohhhhh!! I get what you mean. I never bother about followers because they’re just virtual numbers of people who I’ll probably never meet irl but that’s super cool that you made friends with someone on there. I always read Quora Digest so I get what you mean. I don’t use it often, but when I’m bored I read the daily digest. Sometimes it’s interesting hearing about other people’s rants lol
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