Sound Question Watch

B54321
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
For Edexcel GCSE physics, can anyone explain this specification point (mostly the first and second 'points', I think I understand the 3rd:

4.12P Describe the processes which convert wave disturbances between sound waves and vibrations in
solids, and:
- explain why such processes only work over a limited
frequency range
- use this to explain the way the human ear works
0
reply
The Δa/Δt
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
(Original post by B54321)
For Edexcel GCSE physics, can anyone explain this specification point (mostly the first and second 'points', I think I understand the 3rd:

4.12P Describe the processes which convert wave disturbances between sound waves and vibrations in
solids, and:
- explain why such processes only work over a limited
frequency range
- use this to explain the way the human ear works
Rarefactions and compressions.

Because it is a mechanical wave and work is done to the surroundings.
0
reply
B54321
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#3
(Original post by The Δa/Δt)
Rarefactions and compressions.

Because it is a mechanical wave and work is done to the surroundings.
So for the first point, a sound wave's compressions and rarefactions causes changes in pressure on the surface of a solid, causing particles to vibrate so the wave is passed from the air to the solid as vibrations.

I don't think the second point is actually referring to work done though.
0
reply
The Δa/Δt
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
(Original post by B54321)
So for the first point, a sound wave's compressions and rarefactions causes changes in pressure on the surface of a solid, causing particles to vibrate so the wave is passed from the air to the solid as vibrations.

I don't think the second point is actually referring to work done though.
What do you think then?

Maybe it's referring to wavelength?

My point is that the vibrations stop happening since the energy is lost to the surroundings.
0
reply
B54321
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#5
(Original post by The Δa/Δt)
What do you think then?

Maybe it's referring to wavelength?

My point is that the vibrations stop happening since the energy is lost to the surroundings.
Oh okay, I think that probably is it. Thanks!
0
reply
The Δa/Δt
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 year ago
#6
(Original post by B54321)
Oh okay, I think that probably is it. Thanks!
Good luck on exams.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Bournemouth University
    Clearing Open Day Undergraduate
    Wed, 31 Jul '19
  • Staffordshire University
    Postgraduate open event - Stoke-on-Trent campus Postgraduate
    Wed, 7 Aug '19
  • University of Derby
    Foundation Open Event Further education
    Wed, 7 Aug '19

Are you tempted to change your firm university choice on A-level results day?

Yes, I'll try and go to a uni higher up the league tables (164)
17.45%
Yes, there is a uni that I prefer and I'll fit in better (82)
8.72%
No I am happy with my course choice (560)
59.57%
I'm using Clearing when I have my exam results (134)
14.26%

Watched Threads

View All