Are my grades too bad for Oxbridge?

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ohdearstudying
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Very briefly the context:

2017 GCSE Grades:
A6BB5C

2018 GCSE Grades (prediction)
A*77644

I was out of school for 2 years (2014-2016) due to illness, it's a rare condition that doesn't effect many children/teenagers and is hardly treated in the UK to the severity I had it. My school entered me in for early entry and I was predicted Cs and Ds in every subject I took in 2017

If I was to study English Lit, Government and Politics and Philosophy at A Level at a much better school than I currently am at (A*A*A) would I stand a chance. My dream university for law (potentially with a year abroad or placement) is Oxford, Cambridge, LSE, UCL, KCL

-Warwick/Durham if those aren't suitable

Are my GCSE grades too low for the unis I've suggested and should I look elsewhere to pin my hopes.
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ohdearstudying
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Realitysreflexx
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No one can answer this, the only way you can find out is by applying....

No one who has ever decided to not apply hasnt gotten in, 100% not accepted rate.

If you do apply you have a slim but respectable chance.
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Debbypoz
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Oxbridge first looks at your A level predictions so if you get the predictions of A*A*A than they will be unlikely to look at your GCSEs and decide to not have you.
I would explain that you were going through a tough time if they asked about them in your interview.
Make a killer personal statement too!
Also I would add that Oxbridge look at how good your schools were and if they weren’t great then they will put that into account when deciding.
The GCSEs don’t show anyone true capability so if you believe you will get the grades, go for it and apply!
If you feel like you will struggle to achieve those grades I would maybe look elsewhere to find a uni that has slightly lower entry requirements.
Good luck!
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ohdearstudying
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(Original post by Realitysreflexx)
No one can answer this, the only way you can find out is by applying....

No one who has ever decided to not apply hasnt gotten in, 100% not accepted rate.

If you do apply you have a slim but respectable chance.
Thanks for the response! I'm definitely going to try and apply to either, see which one is the most welcoming/helpful with me.

Is LSE out of my reach due to the mandatory A* requirement?
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ohdearstudying
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(Original post by Debbypoz)
Oxbridge first looks at your A level predictions so if you get the predictions of A*A*A than they will be unlikely to look at your GCSEs and decide to not have you.
I would explain that you were going through a tough time if they asked about them in your interview.
Make a killer personal statement too!
Also I would add that Oxbridge look at how good your schools were and if they weren’t great then they will put that into account when deciding.
The GCSEs don’t show anyone true capability so if you believe you will get the grades, go for it and apply!
If you feel like you will struggle to achieve those grades I would maybe look elsewhere to find a uni that has slightly lower entry requirements.
Good luck!
Thanks for your response! I would definitely be working flat out so hard for A*A*A* if possible, because I am determined to achieve. I think it's quite easy to explan, thankfully it's not a *choice* I made to stay off school.

My school had a 15% A*-C rate last year in English.

Thank you so much! Would you say LSE is reasonable? Also, any other unis that are good for law that have lower entry requirements?
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alireza280202
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If you meet their required grades, then you are fine. What they look for in interviews is if you are passionate about your chose of subject and if you have researched this subject outside of what is expected of you
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ohdearstudying
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(Original post by alireza280202)
If you meet their required grades, then you are fine. What they look for in interviews is if you are passionate about your chose of subject and if you have researched this subject outside of what is expected of you
Thanks for your response. May you please elaborate on the "researched" part, so I wish to go into Law. How could I differentiate myself?
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𝓖𝓱𝓸𝓼𝓽𝓵𝓪𝓭𝔂
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Go for it. G.c.s.e they wouldn't look at much. Re the illness,what you have had to endure to get to where you are now. It inspires commitment and dedication. Oxbridge like students that are dedicated, and for you to come over what you have gone through and still have done well its certainly worth going for
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ohdearstudying
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(Original post by Ghostlady)
Go for it. G.c.s.e they wouldn't look at much. Re the illness,what you have had to endure to get to where you are now. It inspires commitment and dedication. Oxbridge like students that are dedicated, and for you to come over what you have gone through and still have done well its certainly worth going for
Thank you for replying!

That's brilliant to hear! I mean my top grades will be around the essay based subjects for reference. I am hoping they would see that I do have potential!

I can't even imagine being given an oppurtunity like Oxbridge and then failing to work hard for it.

Also, LSE require a certain number of A*s at GCSE, would this hinder me in applying?
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UniWasEz
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If you're privately educated, white middle-class then maybe. If you're black then no. If you do fall into the latter category then the good news is there are plenty of very good universities that have much more modern attitudes.

Either way, good luck.
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alireza280202
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(Original post by ohdearstudying)
Thanks for your response. May you please elaborate on the "researched" part, so I wish to go into Law. How could I differentiate myself?
Well, it is no use in just getting a good grade. After all, the students applying to Oxbridge ALL have good grades so you have to differentiate yourself. By that I mean stand out by doing things that other students would not have done but it must be focused on the subject you are pursuing. So for example Physics, the best way to differentiate yourself is by reading many books made by physicists and understanding modern science breakthroughs like the CERN. But for law, I presume you would know more than I do but maybe read about things outside the specification of the A levels you picked such as reading about Roman laws or something (I'm not quite sure)
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alireza280202
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All I am saying don't be disappointed if you do not get chosen. Lots of bright students end up unlucky. But I would think you have as good a chance as anybody
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𝓖𝓱𝓸𝓼𝓽𝓵𝓪𝓭𝔂
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I think its worth a try. with LSE I would contact them directly to their admissions office. explain your situation and if its a firm no, then at least you know where you stand, before you submit your ucas application.
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ohdearstudying
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(Original post by UniWasEz)
If you're privately educated, white middle-class then maybe. If you're black then no. If you do fall into the latter category then the good news is there are plenty of very good universities that have much more modern attitudes.

Either way, good luck.
Oh dear, is this really the case, even after Cambridge's drive for more people of colour to attend?

I am a person of colour, my sixth form is most likely going to be private but I don't think that would benefit me.
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ohdearstudying
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(Original post by alireza280202)
Well, it is no use in just getting a good grade. After all, the students applying to Oxbridge ALL have good grades so you have to differentiate yourself. By that I mean stand out by doing things that other students would not have done but it must be focused on the subject you are pursuing. So for example Physics, the best way to differentiate yourself is by reading many books made by physicists and understanding modern science breakthroughs like the CERN. But for law, I presume you would know more than I do but maybe read about things outside the specification of the A levels you picked such as reading about Roman laws or something (I'm not quite sure)
I will definitely start getting some reading and contextual knowledge. That may be useful. Thank you so much for explaining, essentially, it's about going beyond the academia in front of you.

How would I show this? Would this be through writing essays or going on courses or just including this in my personal statement.
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ohdearstudying
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(Original post by alireza280202)
All I am saying don't be disappointed if you do not get chosen. Lots of bright students end up unlucky. But I would think you have as good a chance as anybody
not going to lie i really would be.

i've had my heart set on it for 5 years.
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ohdearstudying
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(Original post by Ghostlady)
I think its worth a try. with LSE I would contact them directly to their admissions office. explain your situation and if its a firm no, then at least you know where you stand, before you submit your ucas application.
Even though I'm year 11 would this be okay?

I'm going there in June for a conference, maybe I will ask then
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UniWasEz
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(Original post by ohdearstudying)
Oh dear, is this really the case, even after Cambridge's drive for more people of colour to attend?

I am a person of colour, my sixth form is most likely going to be private but I don't think that would benefit me.
More than a third of Oxford University colleges admitted three or fewer black applicants over the past 3 years.

Don't know about Cambridge, but it wouldn't surprise me if it is a similar situation there.
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𝓖𝓱𝓸𝓼𝓽𝓵𝓪𝓭𝔂
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That's fine. Even go to the open days which usually happen in September. Its worth going round as many unis as possible to get a good feel for the place and ask many questions as possible.
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