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    (Original post by Lemur14)
    Our half term is the week before, but in previous years when it has been in half term people have just had to go into their school and sit the exam in half term.

    Is anyone else potentially going to be sitting the TMUA the same day? I'm looking at Durham and they encourage us to take it...but it's another 2 exams and they're all scheduled for the same day which would be a very long day
    I thought Durham took the MAT into account if you were applying to Oxford?
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    (Original post by Maariyas)
    I thought Durham took the MAT into account if you were applying to Oxford?
    Hmm for some reason I thought they didn't :confused: Will check!
    Although I'm also looking at Lancaster and they quite like the TMUA so I'd probably end up sitting it anyway

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    (Original post by Lemur14)
    Hmm for some reason I thought they didn't :confused: Will check!
    Although I'm also looking at Lancaster and they quite like the TMUA so I'd probably end up sitting it anyway

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    I’m sure they do take it into account because I’ve looked into Durham but I imagine if you were to take both exams, they’d use the one with the better result or will the TMUA take precedence over the MAT
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    (Original post by Maariyas)
    I’m sure they do take it into account because I’ve looked into Durham but I imagine if you were to take both exams, they’d use the one with the better result or will the TMUA take precedence over the MAT
    Well you can wait to get your result for the TMUA before you choose to send it to them so I'd probably wait for that anyway
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    (Original post by r_gup)
    Integer 123 thanks a lot for you extremely heplful post .
    Do you require prior knowedge on graph theory to solve questions ,like an idea about dense/sparse graphs, breadth/depth first search or composing a path with strongly connnected components?
    No worries

    There shouldn't be much prerequisite knowledge for the interviews beyond the syllabus, I think they are to test application of knowledge rather than breadth of knowledge. The knowledge of graph theory required for my Lady Margaret Hall interview I believe may have only been what nodes, edges, paths and connected graphs are.

    (Original post by r_gup)
    And please try to post the pdf at the earliest. I would love to see it.
    I've attached the pdf to this post (the problem sheet for Worcester College CS is attached separately as two images, I hope they're of high enough resolution) It was only the questions I had at interviews, but I'll see if other people I know have questions I can use and upload here Also, in the interviews, there was a discussion, and the questions weren't always just asked, it was often through a discussion to get the required answer. The interviewers try and help you when you are stuck and give you little hints as where your solution should be heading.

    (Original post by r_gup)
    Would there be any benefit in going through the textbooks for D1 and D2 modules?
    It may help to see these types of concepts, but ultimately there probably wouldn't be much knowledge from these modules required, and I assume the interviewers would be testing your application of knowledge more than the breadth

    Hope this is useful
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  1. File Type: pdf Interview Questions.pdf (89.3 KB, 7 views)
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    I can't shake off the idea that Oxford is easier than Cam for maths because the MAT is easier than STEP. I know STEP is harder because a) it is at the end of year 13 and b) it is in order to siphon out the last few applicants rather than eliminate the bottom half.

    Still though, it's really annoying to have to make a choice between the two :/
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    (Original post by JeevesWooster)
    I can't shake off the idea that Oxford is easier than Cam for maths because the MAT is easier than STEP. I know STEP is harder because a) it is at the end of year 13 and b) it is in order to siphon out the last few applicants rather than eliminate the bottom half.

    Still though, it's really annoying to have to make a choice between the two :/
    Honestly dont chose between the two based on which one is easier to get in. Look at the courses and see which one you prefer. For example cambridge seems to have a much larger emphasis on applied stuff compared to oxford (looking at the modules).

    Also visit both cities and see which one you prefer.
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    (Original post by JeevesWooster)
    I can't shake off the idea that Oxford is easier than Cam for maths because the MAT is easier than STEP. I know STEP is harder because a) it is at the end of year 13 and b) it is in order to siphon out the last few applicants rather than eliminate the bottom half.

    Still though, it's really annoying to have to make a choice between the two :/
    I would base your decision on the course content and which town you prefer. At Oxford, actually getting an interview is a hurdle (at Cambridge it's almost guaranteed unless you don't have good predicteds). Also people probably prepare far more for STEP because they have the motivation of the offer and then 5 months to work on it.

    I have heard people at my school say they're going for Oxford just because it's easier - I don't necessarily agree with this. This does seem to be a recurring thing though - we always get a few into Oxford maths or CS but only one every few years into Cambridge because very few people apply there.
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    (Original post by TheMindGarage)
    I would base your decision on the course content and which town you prefer. At Oxford, actually getting an interview is a hurdle (at Cambridge it's almost guaranteed unless you don't have good predicteds). Also people probably prepare far more for STEP because they have the motivation of the offer and then 5 months to work on it.

    I have heard people at my school say they're going for Oxford just because it's easier - I don't necessarily agree with this. This does seem to be a recurring thing though - we always get a few into Oxford maths or CS but only one every few years into Cambridge because very few people apply there.
    Fair enough - I prefer cambridge anyway, and I also like that they cut out most people at the STEP stage so I can at least get on offer
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    (Original post by Integer123)
    No worries

    There shouldn't be much prerequisite knowledge for the interviews beyond the syllabus, I think they are to test application of knowledge rather than breadth of knowledge. The knowledge of graph theory required for my Lady Margaret Hall interview I believe may have only been what nodes, edges, paths and connected graphs are.



    I've attached the pdf to this post (the problem sheet for Worcester College CS is attached separately as two images, I hope they're of high enough resolution) It was only the questions I had at interviews, but I'll see if other people I know have questions I can use and upload here Also, in the interviews, there was a discussion, and the questions weren't always just asked, it was often through a discussion to get the required answer. The interviewers try and help you when you are stuck and give you little hints as where your solution should be heading.



    It may help to see these types of concepts, but ultimately there probably wouldn't be much knowledge from these modules required, and I assume the interviewers would be testing your application of knowledge more than the breadth

    Hope this is useful
    So did you get an offer and from which college (could you guess depending on your performance in the interviews)? Did you know your MAT score after the application process?
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    (Original post by MysteryVader)
    So did you get an offer and from which college (could you guess depending on your performance in the interviews)? Did you know your MAT score after the application process?
    I got an offer, from Worcester College. When I got home from interviews, I was pretty upset and felt as if I may have got rejected, but I think it's hard to gauge how you've done, and the interviewers ultimately make that decision.

    I applied for feedback, I got 82 on the MAT, and for my interviews I got (out of 9):
    7 and 8 at Balliol College
    7- at Lady Margaret Hall
    7 and 7+ at Worcester College

    I wasn't told which subject was which for Balliol College or Worcester, but if I had to guess (based on how I felt the interviews went), I'd say I probably got the higher scores in Maths.

    I'm not sure exactly what each score means, but I think 7 is a borderline score
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    I have a really weird doubt. Is it possible to express the cube of any natural number greater than 4 , as the sum of (n-2) distinct squares?
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    (Original post by r_gup)
    I have a really weird doubt. Is it possible to express the cube of any natural number greater than 4 , as the sum of (n-2) distinct squares?
    Could you please provide the context.
    Is that your conjecture you want us to prove/falsify?
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    (Original post by Quantum Horizon)
    Could you please provide the context.
    Is that your conjecture you want us to prove/falsify?
    Yes. I tried it out, and it works for all numbers till 27. I will upload a photo of the result.
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    (Original post by r_gup)
    I have a really weird doubt. Is it possible to express the cube of any natural number greater than 4 , as the sum of (n-2) distinct squares?
    Just checking what you mean by n-2 there. Are you asking whether the cube of a number n can be expressed as the sum of exactly n-2 distinct squares?

    Are you aware of the four squares theorem? Haven't thought about this too hard, but doesn't your conjecture follow from this by subtracting off a bunch of squares (n - 6 of them) from the n^3 and then expressing the result as four squares?
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    (Original post by r_gup)
    Yes. I tried it out, and it works for all numbers till 27. I will upload a photo of the result.
    Name:  Tri.PNG
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    Still figuring out for 27
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    (Original post by Gregorius)
    Just checking what you mean by n-2 there. Are you asking whether the cube of a number n can be expressed as the sum of exactly n-2 distinct squares?

    Are you aware of the four squares theorem? Haven't thought about this too hard, but doesn't your conjecture follow from this by subtracting off a bunch of squares (n - 6 of them) from the n^3 and then expressing the result as four squares?
    Gregorius , I went through the four squares theorem, and it does not seem to be connected with this conjecture of mine. Anyway , thanks for bringing it to my notice.
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    (Original post by r_gup)
    Name:  Tri.PNG
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    Still figuring out for 27
    Figured for 27.

    I am using a sort of 'recursive' idea , i.e. , I compute the value of the required squares for n^3 , find (n+1)^3-n^3 , and then suitably partition the difference into squares.
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    (Original post by r_gup)
    Figured for 27.

    I am using a sort of 'recursive' idea , i.e. , I compute the value of the required squares for n^3 , find (n+1)^3-n^3 , and then suitably partition the difference into squares.
    For 27 and 28

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    Can anyone help me with MAT 2017 question G. How do you realize that the line pivots around (1,1)
 
 
 
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