What is more important to employers?

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Aranos
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#1
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#1
How would you rank these in terms of importance to employers? As in, would someone with experience in a company (if only for a few months) with a 2:1 have better prospects than someone with a 1st with no experience?
- An integrated masters (vs a BSc)
- A 1st (vs a 2:1)
- A summer internship (vs no experience)
- A summer of research experience (vs no experience)
I'd like to go into a scientific research role in a private company, for reference.
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RogerOxon
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(Original post by Aranos)
How would you rank these in terms of importance to employers? As in, would someone with experience in a company (if only for a few months) with a 2:1 have better prospects than someone with a 1st with no experience?
- An integrated masters (vs a BSc)
- A 1st (vs a 2:1)
- A summer internship (vs no experience)
- A summer of research experience (vs no experience)
I'd like to go into a scientific research role in a private company, for reference.
For scientific research, I would be looking for intellectual ability and an inquiring mind, both of which I would test at interview. The degree classification isn't always teh best indicator. The course content and difficulty would have a bearing too.

Experience would be nice, but, unless it demonstrates a high level of achievement, or was in my comapny (so I can get direct feedback), it wouldn't make a difference. I doubt that any company would expect a raw graduate to not need a reasonable amount of mentoring / supervision.

An integrated masters, with a research element would be helpful, but, again, I'd be wanting to see how good, and well understood, it was at interview.

Most of what you list may be useful for you to decide exactly which branch / aspects interest you most.
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Aranos
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(Original post by RogerOxon)
For scientific research, I would be looking for intellectual ability and an inquiring mind, both of which I would test at interview. The degree classification isn't always teh best indicator. The course content and difficulty would have a bearing too.

Experience would be nice, but, unless it demonstrates a high level of achievement, or was in my comapny (so I can get direct feedback), it wouldn't make a difference. I doubt that any company would expect a raw graduate to not need a reasonable amount of mentoring / supervision.

An integrated masters, with a research element would be helpful, but, again, I'd be wanting to see how good, and well understood, it was at interview.

Most of what you list may be useful for you to decide exactly which branch / aspects interest you most.
So someone with a 1st class integrated masters and relevant work experience wouldn't have much of an advantage over someone with a 2:1 in a BSc with no experience?
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RogerOxon
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(Original post by Aranos)
So someone with a 1st class integrated masters and relevant work experience wouldn't have much of an advantage over someone with a 2:1 in a BSc with no experience?
If it's good enough to get an interview, it'd be down to how good the person is. You don't get that from a few tick boxes.

For scientific research, understanding is key. Depending upon the university / course, a First isn't always a good indicator of the level of intellectual ability. A First at the same university and course is obviously better than a II.1, but less easy to compare across course, university combinations. I certainly wouldn't advise choosing a university where it's easier to get a First. Get into the best, suitable university, and do as well as you reasonably can.

I wouldn't place much weight on experience, unless it demonstrated a high level of ability. No (typical) raw graduate is going to have that much, although it may help get hired into the company where you worked.
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Aranos
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(Original post by RogerOxon)
If it's good enough to get an interview, it'd be down to how good the person is. You don't get that from a few tick boxes.

For scientific research, understanding is key. Depending upon the university / course, a First isn't always a good indicator of the level of intellectual ability. A First at the same university and course is obviously better than a II.1, but less easy to compare across course, university combinations. I certainly wouldn't advise choosing a university where it's easier to get a First. Get into the best, suitable university, and do as well as you reasonably can.

I wouldn't place much weight on experience, unless it demonstrated a high level of ability. No (typical) raw graduate is going to have that much, although it may help get hired into the company where you worked.
Thank you. So would any of the aspects I've mentioned help to get an interview at least? What else would help?
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RogerOxon
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(Original post by Aranos)
Thank you. So would any of the aspects I've mentioned help to get an interview at least? What else would help?
Scientific research isn't my field, but I have done a lot of interviewing, and hired lots of very good people.

Anything that demonstrates intellectual ability, and its application, would. Those would include your 'A' level results and well-explained, interesting projects. Your CV will be very important in demonstrating your passion for research, potentially including specific areas that you are keen on. A PhD would also do that.

Graduate recruitment is difficult, as is finding a good first job. Good luck.
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jelly1000
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(Original post by Aranos)
How would you rank these in terms of importance to employers? As in, would someone with experience in a company (if only for a few months) with a 2:1 have better prospects than someone with a 1st with no experience?
- An integrated masters (vs a BSc)
- A 1st (vs a 2:1)
- A summer internship (vs no experience)
- A summer of research experience (vs no experience)
I'd like to go into a scientific research role in a private company, for reference.
Employers generally value work experience really highly- the person with the 2:1 and some experience could get the job ahead of the person with the 1st and no experience if they can put across that experience well.
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paulkevinmurphy
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Hi,

You can get a first and not be a good fit for the role or the job.

As mentioned above your CV/grades/experience are all just tools to get you to the interview table. Once you are at that stage it's all about how you sell yourself i.e. can you show that you are quick to learn, that you ave initiative, that you will be easy to work with and fit into the team and the culture.

If you do a great interview and really impress, I'd be very surprised if the hiring manager picks someone over you because they got a 1st and you got a 2.1. However, one thing I would say is if's down to three candidates for the final interview, and two of you do great interviews and really impress, then the person with some/more work experience may end up getting the job offer. Sometimes managers will value candidates ability to hit the ground running to a certain extent, and the person with a bit of work experience may be more useful than the other person starting off.

Have said that, do the best interview you can, and then you will have tried your best regardless of your degree/work experience!

Good Luck!
Paul
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username738914
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#9
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#9
(Original post by Aranos)
How would you rank these in terms of importance to employers? As in, would someone with experience in a company (if only for a few months) with a 2:1 have better prospects than someone with a 1st with no experience?
- An integrated masters (vs a BSc)
- A 1st (vs a 2:1)
- A summer internship (vs no experience)
- A summer of research experience (vs no experience)
I'd like to go into a scientific research role in a private company, for reference.
- only matters if you're doing engineering and want to be chartered or want to delve more into research based areas (or want a more solid base to apply for PhDs from)

- negligible difference in overall grad prospects (though some masters require a first and a first is advantageous, if not necessary, for strong PhD programs)

- experience > no experience regardless of grade

- experience > no experience regardless of grade


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