splitter2017
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
Why is statement 2 False.
I know that dark lines in the spectrum correspond to certain wavelengths of light absorbed in the SUNS atmosphere but why would gases int he Earth's atmosphere not do the same thing.

Name:  Capture3.PNG
Views: 88
Size:  59.4 KB
Gases like NO2 , H2O (vapour) and O3 are present in the atmosphere and do absorb somewhat in the visible spectrum...

Attachment 748286748284
Attached files
0
reply
Bushabean
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
These gases can and do absorb some of the photons in the visible spectrum but if they do then they would later emit another photon with a higher frequency and thus it would no longer be in the visible spectrum.
0
reply
splitter2017
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#3
(Original post by Bushabean)
These gases can and do absorb some of the photons in the visible spectrum but if they do then they would later emit another photon with a higher frequency and thus it would no longer be in the visible spectrum.
That is just not true. They would absorb a photon in the visible spectrum and later they would release a photon of lower frequency NOT higher by the laws of conservation of energy. The photons would be emitted in random directions so this would mean there would be reduced intensity at those specific wavelengths.

Anyway, my question is why do the gases in Earth's atmosphere supposedly not create dark absorption lines (if as discussed they can absorb visible wavelengths) on the radiation from a distant star entering our atmosphere.
0
reply
Ladkus
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 years ago
#4
(Original post by splitter2017)
That is just not true. They would absorb a photon in the visible spectrum and later they would release a photon of lower frequency NOT higher by the laws of conservation of energy. The photons would be emitted in random directions so this would mean there would be reduced intensity at those specific wavelengths.

Anyway, my question is why do the gases in Earth's atmosphere supposedly not create dark absorption lines (if as discussed they can absorb visible wavelengths) on the radiation from a distant star entering our atmosphere.
No I'm sure it would be the same frequency photon just as you said lower frequency cause its emitted in all directions
1
reply
Ladkus
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#5
Report 2 years ago
#5
Well thats if it deexcites straight to the ground state again
0
reply
splitter2017
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#6
(Original post by Ladkus)
No I'm sure it would be the same frequency photon just as you said lower frequency cause its emitted in all directions
Yes it would be the same frequency if it simply falls down to the ground state. If it transitions down he energy levels then photons of a lower frequency are emitted. Either way intensity is reduced being emitted in all directions.
0
reply
splitter2017
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#7
Also can someone please answer my question - Why do the gases in Earth's atmosphere supposedly not create dark absorption lines (if as discussed they can absorb visible wavelengths) on the radiation from a distant star entering our atmosphere?
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How will you be receiving your results?

Going into school to pick them up (188)
33.39%
Receiving them online / by email (282)
50.09%
I still don't know (93)
16.52%

Watched Threads

View All