What does GCSE maths translate to in the US System? Watch

ZdYnm8vuNR
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Hello, I am a Y11 and I will be doing double maths next year, and I want to further my maths during the summer to prepare for Y12 by using khan academy. However, it uses the US system and I am lost as to where GCSE / Above maths is, any help?

Thanks.
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Rohit_Rocks10
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SAT Maths
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artful_lounger
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GCSE Maths is about the same level as SAT Maths (certain topics I think go into slightly more depth in GCSE and less for SAT vice versa, although I think the new GCSE is fairly uniformly slightly above that level).

I believe this would equate to Geometry, Algebra I, and I presume at least some of Trigonometry and Algebra II, in terms of classes. I believe the functions etc (including trig functions) from AS level Maths is normally wholly done in Precalculus, but some of those topics or others may be in Trig/Algebra II that as such aren't in the GCSE (however I think the "new" version has brought some of these topics down to the GCSE from the AS so I may be wrong).
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ma_long
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Anything before Calculus
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ZdYnm8vuNR
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
GCSE Maths is about the same level as SAT Maths (certain topics I think go into slightly more depth in GCSE and less for SAT vice versa, although I think the new GCSE is fairly uniformly slightly above that level).

I believe this would equate to Geometry, Algebra I, and I presume at least some of Trigonometry and Algebra II, in terms of classes. I believe the functions etc (including trig functions) from AS level Maths is normally wholly done in Precalculus, but some of those topics or others may be in Trig/Algebra II that as such aren't in the GCSE (however I think the "new" version has brought some of these topics down to the GCSE from the AS so I may be wrong).
Ok but I want to prepare for A level Maths and Further maths, im doing Algebra II and Trigonometry, anything else?
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MCArth
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(Original post by ZdYnm8vuNR)
Ok but I want to prepare for A level Maths and Further maths, im doing Algebra II and Trigonometry, anything else?
Once you've done the standard stuff that's in normal maths (integration by substitution, parts, quotient rule etc), you should move onto imaginary numbers, up to de moivres theorem along with first and second order differential equations to prepare you for further maths. You should be able to search for these topics.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by ZdYnm8vuNR)
Ok but I want to prepare for A level Maths and Further maths, im doing Algebra II and Trigonometry, anything else?
Precalculus would be ideal if possible...although there is (I think...) content overlap towards the latter parts of the course, it will give you a stronger background for going into those, and may go into more depth in a couple of topics which while not examined by the A-level syllabuses, may be useful in your future. Additionally I think some of the earlier topics in Precalc are now part of the GCSE, but I'm slightly removed from that era so I'm not completely up to date on the syllabuses for each these days

I'd note AP Calculus BC seems to be typically considered equivalent to Maths and Further Maths for admissions purposes, as does IB HL Maths. I would further note that these are not necessarily equivalent in terms of content, so you may need to catch up on some areas (for example, I'm aware HL Maths no longer covers Matrices, which is a core topic in FM and is commonly assumed if a course requires FM - although there are not many such courses).

That option may be more relevant to you as such. If not, then I would suggest pursuing whatever preparation your school designates for AP Calculus generally, and BC in particular, as this should serve equally well for A-level.
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ZdYnm8vuNR
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Precalculus would be ideal if possible...although there is (I think...) content overlap towards the latter parts of the course, it will give you a stronger background for going into those, and may go into more depth in a couple of topics which while not examined by the A-level syllabuses, may be useful in your future. Additionally I think some of the earlier topics in Precalc are now part of the GCSE, but I'm slightly removed from that era so I'm not completely up to date on the syllabuses for each these days

I'd note AP Calculus BC seems to be typically considered equivalent to Maths and Further Maths for admissions purposes, as does IB HL Maths. I would further note that these are not necessarily equivalent in terms of content, so you may need to catch up on some areas (for example, I'm aware HL Maths no longer covers Matrices, which is a core topic in FM and is commonly assumed if a course requires FM - although there are not many such courses).

That option may be more relevant to you as such. If not, then I would suggest pursuing whatever preparation your school designates for AP Calculus generally, and BC in particular, as this should serve equally well for A-level.
Thanks a lot! Hopefully this way i'll manage to have a small headstart

Edit: so what is the difference between Ap calculus BC and AB?
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Trinculo
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ZdYnm8vuNR
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Precalculus would be ideal if possible...although there is (I think...) content overlap towards the latter parts of the course, it will give you a stronger background for going into those, and may go into more depth in a couple of topics which while not examined by the A-level syllabuses, may be useful in your future. Additionally I think some of the earlier topics in Precalc are now part of the GCSE, but I'm slightly removed from that era so I'm not completely up to date on the syllabuses for each these days

I'd note AP Calculus BC seems to be typically considered equivalent to Maths and Further Maths for admissions purposes, as does IB HL Maths. I would further note that these are not necessarily equivalent in terms of content, so you may need to catch up on some areas (for example, I'm aware HL Maths no longer covers Matrices, which is a core topic in FM and is commonly assumed if a course requires FM - although there are not many such courses).

That option may be more relevant to you as such. If not, then I would suggest pursuing whatever preparation your school designates for AP Calculus generally, and BC in particular, as this should serve equally well for A-level.
One last question, so should I skip Algebra 2 and trigonometry and just start at Precalculus or should I still do Algebra 2 and trig? (Current skill is GCSE Maths)
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Prasiortle
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(Original post by ZdYnm8vuNR)
One last question, so should I skip Algebra 2 and trigonometry and just start at Precalculus or should I still do Algebra 2 and trig? (Current skill is GCSE Maths)
From what I'm aware, Algebra 2 starts with stuff like graphing equations which is within GCSE, then rapidly approaches the hardest topics of GCSE with e.g. quadratic inequalities, and then continues well beyond GCSE to A-Level topics such as polynomials, functions, exponentials, logarithms, rational functions, sequences and series, after which it also goes onto Further Maths topics such as matrices, complex numbers, and conic sections.

Similarly from what I can tell, trigonometry starts from GCSE stuff (basic SOH CAH TOA, then the Sine and Cosine Rules), then onto the top end of GCSE with the unit circle definitions of trigonometric functions and their graphs, after which it goes onto the A-Level topics of trigonometric identities, solving trigonometric equations, reciprocal trigonometric functions, and inverse trigonometric functions.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by ZdYnm8vuNR)
Thanks a lot! Hopefully this way i'll manage to have a small headstart

Edit: so what is the difference between Ap calculus BC and AB?
BC covers more topics - stuff with hyperbolic functions, conics, and polar coordinates etc, I think.

The collegeboard website probably outlines it more clearly, they have a lot of information on both on there
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ZdYnm8vuNR
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(Original post by Prasiortle)
From what I'm aware, Algebra 2 starts with stuff like graphing equations which is within GCSE, then rapidly approaches the hardest topics of GCSE with e.g. quadratic inequalities, and then continues well beyond GCSE to A-Level topics such as polynomials, functions, exponentials, logarithms, rational functions, sequences and series, after which it also goes onto Further Maths topics such as matrices, complex numbers, and conic sections.

Similarly from what I can tell, trigonometry starts from GCSE stuff (basic SOH CAH TOA, then the Sine and Cosine Rules), then onto the top end of GCSE with the unit circle definitions of trigonometric functions and their graphs, after which it goes onto the A-Level topics of trigonometric identities, solving trigonometric equations, reciprocal trigonometric functions, and inverse trigonometric functions.
Ok then I feel like it would be useful to do Algebra 2 completely so it walks me through GCSE stuff into the A level stuff right?
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Prasiortle
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(Original post by ZdYnm8vuNR)
Ok then I feel like it would be useful to do Algebra 2 completely so it walks me through GCSE stuff into the A level stuff right?
I guess you could, but why would you want to do a bunch of A-Level stuff at this point?
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ZdYnm8vuNR
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(Original post by Prasiortle)
I guess you could, but why would you want to do a bunch of A-Level stuff at this point?
To have a headstart into A levels
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Dilan656
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Instead of using khan academy use hegartymaths
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Prasiortle
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(Original post by ZdYnm8vuNR)
To have a headstart into A levels
The best way to "have a head start" for A-Level is to practice your basic algebra, because the primary reason why so many students find the jump from GCSE up to A-Level so difficult is that they're still a bit shaky with manipulating algebraic fractions, solving inequalities, working with quadratic expressions, etc., and thus they find the increased amount of abstraction expected at this level of study rather difficult to cope with.
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