pero123
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hello guys, i am interested to get a msc in marine engineering and i was wondering which university is better on this topic, UCL or Newcastle? I know that UCL is more prestigious and for sure it is a good thing to get that name on your CV but at the same time it is much more expensive (i am not talking just about the fees but also about the living cost in London). However, i can affort it but i don't know if it really is worth it. Can u help me plz?? thanks!
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StarLinyx
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(Original post by pero123)
hello guys, i am interested to get a msc in marine engineering and i was wondering which university is better on this topic, UCL or Newcastle? I know that UCL is more prestigious and for sure it is a good thing to get that name on your CV but at the same time it is much more expensive (i am not talking just about the fees but also about the living cost in London). However, i can affort it but i don't know if it really is worth it. Can u help me plz?? thanks!
UCL of course!
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Student-95
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Ignore prestige and pick the university you prefer. You haven't said anything about the course content, structure, assessment etc. Also have you visited the universities?
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Helloworld_95
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From a quick look at the course structures, Newcastle's course looks a lot more Marine Engineering oriented whereas UCL's seems like they took much/electrical topics somewhat related to Marine Engineering then slapped a couple of relevant projects on top.

I also think Newcastle as a city has more of a pedigree for marine engineering which will help make it well known within marine engineering circles, but I'm not entirely sure about that.
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pero123
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ok let me chage it a bit. it seems that course content is very interesting and similar in both universities. and yes it is true that UCL has more electrical courses but in this case you have an oprion to choose between an electrical stream (electrical machines and power electronic systems, electrical power systems and electrical propulsion) or a mechanical stream (material fatigue/fracture analysis, heat transfer and heat system).On the other hand, Newcastle has a pure marine core contect with courses ike fundamentals of marine engineering, marine machinery, marine conditioning, marine power systems etc. (this content is also in UCL's syllabus but with different name) but also it gives you the chance to study some managerial and comercial content with the corse "Reaserch skills and Commercial skills" (whereas in UCL u dont). Another different between this two universitites is that in UCL you have the oppportunity to practise and learn some computer "techniques" such us FEA and CFD (in Newcaslte you don't) and also in the main ship exercise you hhave the chance to design the power plant and the machinery of your own ship by using the PARAMARINE software and also a numerous others such as PSCAD and other computer simulations.(In newcastle you just use matlab and simulink for some electrical aspects and PRIMER for the research-comercial course). So, maybe one can say that UCL offers a mechanical/electrical course which is focus in marine environment (ships, offsore etc), whereas Newcastle as i said is a pure marine oriented engineering. What do you think is a better option?? and tell please if i am wrong and i have a mess in my head for these two courses :P . Thanks!
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Helloworld_95
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(Original post by pero123)
ok let me chage it a bit. it seems that course content is very interesting and similar in both universities. and yes it is true that UCL has more electrical courses but in this case you have an oprion to choose between an electrical stream (electrical machines and power electronic systems, electrical power systems and electrical propulsion) or a mechanical stream (material fatigue/fracture analysis, heat transfer and heat system).On the other hand, Newcastle has a pure marine core contect with courses ike fundamentals of marine engineering, marine machinery, marine conditioning, marine power systems etc. (this content is also in UCL's syllabus but with different name) but also it gives you the chance to study some managerial and comercial content with the corse "Reaserch skills and Commercial skills" (whereas in UCL u dont). Another different between this two universitites is that in UCL you have the oppportunity to practise and learn some computer "techniques" such us FEA and CFD (in Newcaslte you don't) and also in the main ship exercise you hhave the chance to design the power plant and the machinery of your own ship by using the PARAMARINE software and also a numerous others such as PSCAD and other computer simulations.(In newcastle you just use matlab and simulink for some electrical aspects and PRIMER for the research-comercial course). So, maybe one can say that UCL offers a mechanical/electrical course which is focus in marine environment (ships, offsore etc), whereas Newcastle as i said is a pure marine oriented engineering. What do you think is a better option?? and tell please if i am wrong and i have a mess in my head for these two courses :P . Thanks!
I wouldn't say the two courses are similar at all, they're very different in fact. Newcastle's course seems to have a taught component specifically tailored towards Marine Engineering including consideration of specific standards to abide by and then the research component will be Marine Engineering also whereas UCL's taught component is not Marine oriented (while it may cover the same basic content, it doesn't go into the marine specific stuff), only the design and research components.

I would imagine the reason why Newcastle doesn't cover FEA and CFD is that you would be expected to know how to do them already, and even if you don't they are very simple to learn the basics of, so putting it on the syllabus just takes away from the time that could be spent on other topics. UCL using industry specific software is a bonus, however if it's at the expense of not using MATLAB/Simulink then it's a double edged sword. Those kinds of software tend to not teach you to understand how what you're doing works, you don't need to be a degree qualified engineer in order to get what you're doing with them, whereas e.g. MATLAB based assignments will help your understanding considerably more.

The UCL degree may be better for getting jobs outside of Marine Engineering, but that kind of defeats the point of studying Marine engineering. Additionally this could well be offset by your dissertation topic, 80 credits in diesel engine research is going to look a lot more enticing to a diesel engine manufacturer than what you would get from UCL.
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humanteaparty
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all things being equal newcastle has a better reputation for marine engineering than ucl.
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pero123
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(Original post by Helloworld_95)
I wouldn't say the two courses are similar at all, they're very different in fact. Newcastle's course seems to have a taught component specifically tailored towards Marine Engineering including consideration of specific standards to abide by and then the research component will be Marine Engineering also whereas UCL's taught component is not Marine oriented (while it may cover the same basic content, it doesn't go into the marine specific stuff), only the design and research components.

I would imagine the reason why Newcastle doesn't cover FEA and CFD is that you would be expected to know how to do them already, and even if you don't they are very simple to learn the basics of, so putting it on the syllabus just takes away from the time that could be spent on other topics. UCL using industry specific software is a bonus, however if it's at the expense of not using MATLAB/Simulink then it's a double edged sword. Those kinds of software tend to not teach you to understand how what you're doing works, you don't need to be a degree qualified engineer in order to get what you're doing with them, whereas e.g. MATLAB based assignments will help your understanding considerably more.

The UCL degree may be better for getting jobs outside of Marine Engineering, but that kind of defeats the point of studying Marine engineering. Additionally this could well be offset by your dissertation topic, 80 credits in diesel engine research is going to look a lot more enticing to a diesel engine manufacturer than what you would get from UCL.

ok, i see your point. but as far as FEA and CFD are concerned, with the same logic Matlab/Simulink are topics that you would be expected to know. also instead of matlab in UCL is used PSCAD.

Clearly it seems that you prefer Newcastle than UCL for this program but i don't know... something tells me that UCL's has more to offer. and i am not talking just because of the name. The program in UCl is accredited by IET, RINA and IMAREST whereas in Newcastle by RINA and IMAREST. that strong mechanical/electrical backround i believe is more beneficial.

However, thank you for your opinion and your advice. I will think more about it and I hope finally to make the best choice.
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Smack
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(Original post by pero123)
ok, i see your point. but as far as FEA and CFD are concerned, with the same logic Matlab/Simulink are topics that you would be expected to know. also instead of matlab in UCL is used PSCAD.

Clearly it seems that you prefer Newcastle than UCL for this program but i don't know... something tells me that UCL's has more to offer. and i am not talking just because of the name. The program in UCl is accredited by IET, RINA and IMAREST whereas in Newcastle by RINA and IMAREST. that strong mechanical/electrical backround i believe is more beneficial.

However, thank you for your opinion and your advice. I will think more about it and I hope finally to make the best choice.
Additional accreditation doesn't matter as long as it's accredited by at least one relevant institution, such as the RINA or IMarEST in your case. UCL is probably also accredited by IET because it covers more of the electrical power and control systems side of things.

What kind of role are you looking for after graduation?
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pero123
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(Original post by Smack)
Additional accreditation doesn't matter as long as it's accredited by at least one relevant institution, such as the RINA or IMarEST in your case. UCL is probably also accredited by IET because it covers more of the electrical power and control systems side of things.

What kind of role are you looking for after graduation?
i don't know exactly. i love being a mechanical engineer and i love ships for sure but i would also gave a chance in order to pursue a career in offsore. (always talking about the power plants and machinery etc.)
Finally, a mangerial position in this would be perfect :P

(My previous degree is meng in production engineering and management)
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Student-95
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(Original post by pero123)
i don't know exactly. i love being a mechanical engineer and i love ships for sure but i would also gave a chance in order to pursue a career in offsore. (always talking about the power plants and machinery etc.)
Finally, a mangerial position in this would be perfect :P

(My previous degree is meng in production engineering and management)
Do you need the MSc at all if you already have a master's? Can't you find a job with your current degree?
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pero123
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Do you need the MSc at all if you already have a master's? Can't you find a job with your current degree?
i can, but in my studies i realize that a career in ship industy is what i really want and there are a lot of things still to learn in order to pursue a successful career in this field. That's why i want this msc
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Helloworld_95
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(Original post by pero123)
ok, i see your point. but as far as FEA and CFD are concerned, with the same logic Matlab/Simulink are topics that you would be expected to know. also instead of matlab in UCL is used PSCAD.

Clearly it seems that you prefer Newcastle than UCL for this program but i don't know... something tells me that UCL's has more to offer. and i am not talking just because of the name. The program in UCl is accredited by IET, RINA and IMAREST whereas in Newcastle by RINA and IMAREST. that strong mechanical/electrical backround i believe is more beneficial.

However, thank you for your opinion and your advice. I will think more about it and I hope finally to make the best choice.
Not really, I'm talking about how MATLAB/Simulink are used in order to directly implement understanding, e.g. you can use FEA software without knowing what it does, but creating your own FEA simulation in MATLAB is going to give you a much deeper understanding of how FEA works. PSCAD is a very different software to MATLAB and still pretty different to simulink so I'm unsure why you're comparing them...

Having IET accreditation is going to make pretty much no difference if you're going into marine engineering careers, as long as you have one accrediting body it will be fine, and you already have IMechE accreditation behind you anyway.

You also said Newcastle covers management related topics while UCL doesn't, and you also want to get into management. And you're saying UCL provides the balance of mechanical and electrical but it seems like the only topic that UCL covers on the electrical side that Newcastle doesn't is electric propulsion, and you also need to choose the electrical speciality in order to do that. So I'm confused as to why you think UCL has more to offer unless you have a die-hard obsession with electric propulsion? (which I'm 90%+ sure you would be able to do a diss on at Newcastle anyway)

It's ok to say you want to go to UCL, it's just odd that you would ask which one is better when you seem to have made your mind up before asking the question...
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pero123
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(Original post by Helloworld_95)
Not really, I'm talking about how MATLAB/Simulink are used in order to directly implement understanding, e.g. you can use FEA software without knowing what it does, but creating your own FEA simulation in MATLAB is going to give you a much deeper understanding of how FEA works. PSCAD is a very different software to MATLAB and still pretty different to simulink so I'm unsure why you're comparing them...

Having IET accreditation is going to make pretty much no difference if you're going into marine engineering careers, as long as you have one accrediting body it will be fine, and you already have IMechE accreditation behind you anyway.

You also said Newcastle covers management related topics while UCL doesn't, and you also want to get into management. And you're saying UCL provides the balance of mechanical and electrical but it seems like the only topic that UCL covers on the electrical side that Newcastle doesn't is electric propulsion, and you also need to choose the electrical speciality in order to do that. So I'm confused as to why you think UCL has more to offer unless you have a die-hard obsession with electric propulsion? (which I'm 90%+ sure you would be able to do a diss on at Newcastle anyway)

It's ok to say you want to go to UCL, it's just odd that you would ask which one is better when you seem to have made your mind up before asking the question...

you don't want to understand me. In Newcastle in marine engineering course they dont have a course with FEA content at all (the same with CFD).i never said that in Newcastle they use matlab for FEM. I just said that for UCL they are using PSCAD and in Newcastle are using matlab and simulink to calculate the performance of power and control systems. that's why i am comparing them.

yes it is true that in Newcastle managerial course is more extend but because of the nature of my previous degree i have a good theoritical backaround in management.

i dont have a die hard obsession for electrical propulsion but from what i know i blieve that through that we can talk about new techologies and it plays a key role to understand and appreciate advances in technology and control that are influencing future designs.

For sure, each uni has its pros and cons
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Student-95
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(Original post by pero123)
i can, but in my studies i realize that a career in ship industy is what i really want and there are a lot of things still to learn in order to pursue a successful career in this field. That's why i want this msc
Can't you apply for jobs in the ship industry with your current degree and learn in the field?
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Doones
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(Original post by pero123)
but at the same time it is much more expensive (i am not talking just about the fees but also about the living cost in London)
The cost of living in Newcastle is *much* lower than London.

Are you an international student or UK/EU?

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pero123
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
The cost of living in Newcastle is *much* lower than London.

Are you an international student or UK/EU?

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i am an EU student. i know that the cost of living in Londom is higher but i can affort it. My query here is if it is worth it....
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Doones
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(Original post by pero123)
i am an EU student. i know that the cost of living in Londom is higher but i can affort it. My query here is if it is worth it....
From all the advice you've been given it seems you are set on UCL
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