MSc Economics at Warwick or MSc Management at Cass ?

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saquib1996isb
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I have received a conditional offer for an MSc Economics at Warwick and an MSc Management from Cass Business School (2.1 and I currently have a high 2.1).. I am in my final year of a BSc Economics at City, University of London and an international student. I wish to do a masters to improve my employability, as my preference is to get a job in the UK/abroad within: Banking and Finance, Consulting and the Tech industry; so mostly in the private sector. Which MSc degree would be better for that?? From what I understand an MSc in Management will help me better to get a job in the industries I have mentioned but I'm not sure as I believe prestige of the university plays a huge role in the HR selection process and MSc Economics at Warwick is very well-ranked in comparison to the MSc Management at Cass. I'm a bit confused so any advice on which uni and why (in terms of getting a graduate job in the industries I have mentioned) would be helpful

Thanks in advance for anyone who replies
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Exceptional
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Well, obviously Warwick in term of rep for those careers, but the bigger question is whether you want to study Economics or Management
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saquib1996isb
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(Original post by Exceptional)
Well, obviously Warwick in term of rep for those careers, but the bigger question is whether you want to study Economics or Management
Having studied Economics for 3 years I honestly, personally, do not see much of it being applied in the 'real' world in the sense that the assumptions economists have to make are brutally unrealistic when constructing models, e.g. individuals are rational, we all have full information etc etc. There are benefits to studying MSc Economics, however, such as the scientific method we apply, the way economists test hypothesis which improves critical thinking, analytical skills for sue etc

On the other hand, I applied to an MSc Management at Cass because I am in my final year at City for BSc Economics (and Cass is a part of City) and it seemed more directly applicable to 'real life' situations in the working environment I wish to get a job in.

To be clear, I wish to do the best Masters programme to secure a job in the industries I have mentioned, and I understand that Warwick has a more 'collegiate' reputation, which employers are more inclined to favour I believe. Do you think this is a misconception?
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Exceptional
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(Original post by saquib1996isb)
Having studied Economics for 3 years I honestly, personally, do not see much of it being applied in the 'real' world in the sense that the assumptions economists have to make are brutally unrealistic when constructing models, e.g. individuals are rational, we all have full information etc etc. There are benefits to studying MSc Economics, however, such as the scientific method we apply, the way economists test hypothesis which improves critical thinking, analytical skills for sue etc

On the other hand, I applied to an MSc Management at Cass because I am in my final year at City for BSc Economics (and Cass is a part of City) and it seemed more directly applicable to 'real life' situations in the working environment I wish to get a job in.

To be clear, I wish to do the best Masters programme to secure a job in the industries I have mentioned, and I understand that Warwick has a more 'collegiate' reputation, which employers are more inclined to favour I believe. Do you think this is a misconception?
I think the stats speak for themselves in the sense that Warwick is more represented in some of the areas you're interested in. I don't think the content of a degree is going to better prepare you necessarily, since hard skills are learned on the job, and many people go in with a bachelor's in an unrelated subject, let alone an MSc.

Why didn't you apply to Warwick's MSc in Management out of curiosity?
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saquib1996isb
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(Original post by Exceptional)
I think the stats speak for themselves in the sense that Warwick is more represented in some of the areas you're interested in. I don't think the content of a degree is going to better prepare you necessarily, since hard skills are learned on the job, and many people go in with a bachelor's in an unrelated subject, let alone an MSc.

Why didn't you apply to Warwick's MSc in Management out of curiosity?
I actually would have, but due to my final exams nearing and due to bad planning on my part, I didn't have much time to create a tailored personal statement for Warwick's MSc Management. Since I am a (soon to be) City graduate, I knew my chances would be higher and they would respond faster with either offer/rejection than other unis.

In the meantime I have asked around friends and family who have already gone through this experience and they agree with you that for the industries I am aiming for that an MSc Economics would be a better choice. In terms of getting a job, it also keeps a lot of doors open into e.g. policy, research which I think would've been somewhat limited if I do a Management degree, which I may eventually come to appreciate (who knows about the future).

Thanks for the advice man.
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saquib1996isb
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Hopefully this post helps other people with the same dilemma, and those people browsing are also welcome to give advice
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Jimmy199415
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(Original post by saquib1996isb)
I have received a conditional offer for an MSc Economics at Warwick and an MSc Management from Cass Business School (2.1 and I currently have a high 2.1).. I am in my final year of a BSc Economics at City, University of London and an international student. I wish to do a masters to improve my employability, as my preference is to get a job in the UK/abroad within: Banking and Finance, Consulting and the Tech industry; so mostly in the private sector. Which MSc degree would be better for that?? From what I understand an MSc in Management will help me better to get a job in the industries I have mentioned but I'm not sure as I believe prestige of the university plays a huge role in the HR selection process and MSc Economics at Warwick is very well-ranked in comparison to the MSc Management at Cass. I'm a bit confused so any advice on which uni and why (in terms of getting a graduate job in the industries I have mentioned) would be helpful

Thanks in advance for anyone who replies
Hi there. I apologise if this is off topic, but I was wondering how long did it take Warwick to make you an offer? I applied on the 10th of May (last reference was submitted on the 22nd of May) for the MSc Finance course, but I am concerned that the fact that I submitted my application so late, this might reduce significantly my chances of receiving an offer.
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saquib1996isb
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(Original post by Jimmy199415)
Hi there. I apologise if this is off topic, but I was wondering how long did it take Warwick to make you an offer? I applied on the 10th of May (last reference was submitted on the 22nd of May) for the MSc Finance course, but I am concerned that the fact that I submitted my application so late, this might reduce significantly my chances of receiving an offer.
I submitted my application from my end on the 4th of April and luckily enough my referee did as well on the same date (only 1 reference is needed for MSc Economics, don't know about MSc Finance). I received my offer on the 22/23rd of May. MSc Finance is a Warwick Business School masters programme so the 'average' time taken for processing an application may be different from just the University of Warwick - so they may have different postgraduate admissions team for each. However, for MSc Economics (which is taught under UoW) said a decision will usually take within 4 to 6 weeks.

In regards to the timing of your application submission - I'm sure you will be fine. A lot of people don't do a masters so "competition" is significantly reduced in that sense and hence, if you think of it that way, the 'acceptance' rate is higher. I think it's fine as when I made the account to make submit the application and chose my course, it said the deadline was: 31st July 23:59. I have a feeling that the deadline is around the same time as that of MSc Finance. Maybe you can make a 'mock' account and look out for the actual deadline on the application form?

I hope this helped
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Jimmy199415
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(Original post by saquib1996isb)
I submitted my application from my end on the 4th of April and luckily enough my referee did as well on the same date (only 1 reference is needed for MSc Economics, don't know about MSc Finance). I received my offer on the 22/23rd of May. MSc Finance is a Warwick Business School masters programme so the 'average' time taken for processing an application may be different from just the University of Warwick - so they may have different postgraduate admissions team for each. However, for MSc Economics (which is taught under UoW) said a decision will usually take within 4 to 6 weeks.

In regards to the timing of your application submission - I'm sure you will be fine. A lot of people don't do a masters so "competition" is significantly reduced in that sense and hence, if you think of it that way, the 'acceptance' rate is higher. I think it's fine as when I made the account to make submit the application and chose my course, it said the deadline was: 31st July 23:59. I have a feeling that the deadline is around the same time as that of MSc Finance. Maybe you can make a 'mock' account and look out for the actual deadline on the application form?

I hope this helped
Thank you very much, I really appreciate your reply

To be honest I also applied to St Andrews university. If you were to recommend me one of the two universities, would that be St Andrews or Warwick? (I will be graduating at Glasgow university in June).
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saquib1996isb
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(Original post by Jimmy199415)
Thank you very much, I really appreciate your reply

To be honest I also applied to St Andrews university. If you were to recommend me one of the two universities, would that be St Andrews or Warwick? (I will be graduating at Glasgow university in June).
Just to look at the unis at face value, the obvious choice is Warwick due to: rankings, general reputation, employability and academic staff. According to QS World Rankings (I'm quoting QS because I trust their rankings), for the general category of 'Accounting and Finance', Warwick is ranked 6th in the UK:

https://www.topuniversities.com/univ...unting-finance

In general, Warwick is ranked 37th best university in the world, whereas St. Andrews is 97th. Make of that what you will:

https://www.topuniversities.com/univ...-rankings/2018

From my point of view, the choice is obvious - it is Warwick. However, if relocation and other related tasks/hindrances as such make you gravitate towards St. Andrews, then it is quite a good uni as well. Of course, the choice is yours but you should also look into factors you consider important (e.g. employability, quality of research undertaken at each institution specifically for Finance) to make your decision. For example, if you intend to work in, let's say, in Scotland, then in no way is St. Andrews a bad choice as due to the close vicinity, employers will know that is one of the best unis 'around there' and because of this you may get the job. However, if you want to work in London, the competition is quite stiff, so if were to apply for a position they will gravitate towards Warwick graduates then other graduates from other unis. For example, An acquaintance of mine works at Citibank in the IB division and she told me they often hire Warwick graduates. My point is I think vicinity plays a role and has a 'snowball' effect.

This is my theory of course, so correct me if I am wrong. I may have gone off a tangent but this info may help other people looking at this thread.

Also, this is my opinion, so please keep that in mind. Like I have already said, the decision is yours - just take it considering all the factors and your own personal circumstances.
I hope all I said makes sense and helps. Good luck with your studies!
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Jimmy199415
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(Original post by saquib1996isb)
Just to look at the unis at face value, the obvious choice is Warwick due to: rankings, general reputation, employability and academic staff. According to QS World Rankings (I'm quoting QS because I trust their rankings), for the general category of 'Accounting and Finance', Warwick is ranked 6th in the UK:

https://www.topuniversities.com/univ...unting-finance

In general, Warwick is ranked 37th best university in the world, whereas St. Andrews is 97th. Make of that what you will:

https://www.topuniversities.com/univ...-rankings/2018

From my point of view, the choice is obvious - it is Warwick. However, if relocation and other related tasks/hindrances as such make you gravitate towards St. Andrews, then it is quite a good uni as well. Of course, the choice is yours but you should also look into factors you consider important (e.g. employability, quality of research undertaken at each institution specifically for Finance) to make your decision. For example, if you intend to work in, let's say, in Scotland, then in no way is St. Andrews a bad choice as due to the close vicinity, employers will know that is one of the best unis 'around there' and because of this you may get the job. However, if you want to work in London, the competition is quite stiff, so if were to apply for a position they will gravitate towards Warwick graduates then other graduates from other unis. For example, An acquaintance of mine works at Citibank in the IB division and she told me they often hire Warwick graduates. My point is I think vicinity plays a role and has a 'snowball' effect.

This is my theory of course, so correct me if I am wrong. I may have gone off a tangent but this info may help other people looking at this thread.
I hope all I said makes sense and helps. Good luck with your studies!
Thank you very much, really appreciate your help.

To be honest, I will proceed with academia (i.e. PhD, lecturer etc.), so I am looking for a university that will open me more doors. Thank you for the very informative response, can't stress enough how much I appreciate it.

To be honest, I was looking at the UK rankings, which rank St Andrews in the 5th place (https://www.thecompleteuniversitygui...ables/rankings). Further, the international rankings rank edinburgh university in the 25th place; however, although edinburgh university is ranked higher in international rankings, I am of the perception that st andrews is better (please correct me if I am wrong); perhaps, this is a reason why I did not give so much focus on the international rankings.
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saquib1996isb
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(Original post by Jimmy199415)
Thank you very much, really appreciate your help.

To be honest, I will proceed with academia (i.e. PhD, lecturer etc.), so I am looking for a university that will open me more doors. Thank you for the very informative response, can't stress enough how much I appreciate it.

To be honest, I was looking at the UK rankings, which rank St Andrews in the 5th place (https://www.thecompleteuniversitygui...ables/rankings). Further, the international rankings rank edinburgh university in the 25th place; however, although edinburgh university is ranked higher in international rankings, I am of the perception that st andrews is better (please correct me if I am wrong); perhaps, this is a reason why I did not give so much focus on the international rankings.
If academia is your future career aspiration, then I don't much about that to be quite honest with you. However, this makes the important things for you to consider much easier to 'pick out' such as academic staff quality, the research undertaken by the professors at St. Andrews and if you like it or not and want to do something along those lines in the future etc etc. In terms of rankings, it always differs from the 'body' who ranks these institutions, so if you trust completeuniversity, then St. Andrews is the way to go

Best of luck mate!
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Jimmy199415
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(Original post by saquib1996isb)
If academia is your future career aspiration, then I don't much about that to be quite honest with you. However, this makes the important things for you to consider much easier to 'pick out' such as academic staff quality, the research undertaken by the professors at St. Andrews and if you like it or not and want to do something along those lines in the future etc etc. In terms of rankings, it always differs from the 'body' who ranks these institutions, so if you trust completeuniversity, then St. Andrews is the way to go

Best of luck mate!
Thank you very much, best of luck to you too
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Jimmy199415
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(Original post by saquib1996isb)
If academia is your future career aspiration, then I don't much about that to be quite honest with you. However, this makes the important things for you to consider much easier to 'pick out' such as academic staff quality, the research undertaken by the professors at St. Andrews and if you like it or not and want to do something along those lines in the future etc etc. In terms of rankings, it always differs from the 'body' who ranks these institutions, so if you trust completeuniversity, then St. Andrews is the way to go

Best of luck mate!
Hi there. I received the following email from the University of Warwick earlier this morning:

"Our Postgraduate Admissions Service have recently confirmed a decision on your application to Warwick. They’ll be sending you an e-mail with full details on their decision so if you haven’t received it yet, do look out for it".

However, as I have not received an email yet, would you recommend me to call the university directly, or should I wait a few hours prior to them getting in contact with me?

I am really sorry for the continuous questions.
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saquib1996isb
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No problem, I received the same email and within a few hours received my offer. So I would wait. Also check your junk/spam folder if the offer went there by mistake
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Navyhavn
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(Original post by saquib1996isb)
.
In a purely prestige point of view, Warwick MSc Economics is better than Cass MSc Management, since Warwick > Cass (even at the MSc level). While degree subject doesn't matter as much, but economics is seen as more rigorous and that combined with the better brand in Warwick makes that the better choice.

You'd probably prefer enjoy learning Management, and you're right, it will be more relevant to the real world than Economics would be. However for many of the roles you've described, you'll learn most of what there is to learn on the job, particularly in the case of IB, where neither degree will be too relevant.

Both offers are good so congratulations.But if you feel that you rushed your applications and could potentially get a better offer if you spend more time (LSE, LBS, Cambridge, Oxford, Imperial), then I wouldn't neglect the idea of working for a year (and building up work experience), and then doing the Master's a year later. But this is not necessary since either offer should put you on a decent footing.
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Jimmy199415
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(Original post by saquib1996isb)
No problem, I received the same email and within a few hours received my offer. So I would wait. Also check your junk/spam folder if the offer went there by mistake
Great, thank you very much.

I ended up calling them, but they told me that they can't tell me the decision via phone (not sure if these are bad news), and I received an email half an hour later saying that they are currently experiencing a high volume of decisions and that I should wait up to the 8th of June. Not sure if these are bad news...
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Duncan2012
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MSc Management is a jack-of-all-trades degree which won't make you an expert in anything (economics hones your skills in a particular field). I would question whether it will make you any more employable over your current degree. Why not get a job then come back for a good MBA in a couple of years. In almost all cases the perceived prestige of a particular university is non-existent (research the recruiting processes of firms for proof of this, several are now 'education-blind').

In your case I would base my decision on economics > management.
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saquib1996isb
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(Original post by Jimmy199415)
Great, thank you very much.

I ended up calling them, but they told me that they can't tell me the decision via phone (not sure if these are bad news), and I received an email half an hour later saying that they are currently experiencing a high volume of decisions and that I should wait up to the 8th of June. Not sure if these are bad news...
I'm just seeing this.. Did you find out? If not Warwick you have St. Andrews to look forward to
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saquib1996isb
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(Original post by Navyhavn)
In a purely prestige point of view, Warwick MSc Economics is better than Cass MSc Management, since Warwick > Cass (even at the MSc level). While degree subject doesn't matter as much, but economics is seen as more rigorous and that combined with the better brand in Warwick makes that the better choice.

You'd probably prefer enjoy learning Management, and you're right, it will be more relevant to the real world than Economics would be. However for many of the roles you've described, you'll learn most of what there is to learn on the job, particularly in the case of IB, where neither degree will be too relevant.

Both offers are good so congratulations.But if you feel that you rushed your applications and could potentially get a better offer if you spend more time (LSE, LBS, Cambridge, Oxford, Imperial), then I wouldn't neglect the idea of working for a year (and building up work experience), and then doing the Master's a year later. But this is not necessary since either offer should put you on a decent footing.
Firstly, thank you for your response . I actually want to finish my "academic career" in the sense that I want to complete my BSc and MSc and then get into full-time employment. Economics-related jobs sometimes require/employers prefer someone with a masters so by doing the masters straight away, I am eligible to apply for those jobs. Also, being an international student, I have very limited companies that I can apply to as the number of companies out there in the UK are very limited that can sponsor my work visa. I'm happy with Warwick and hopefully can meet their condition of 2.1 with the results of my final year being satisfactory enough.
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