LonelyStarr
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I am currently on dilemma. I am unsure whether i want to do Biology, Chemistry and Biochemistry MSci. I do know what is going on each course however i want to know if there is any good career progression, job prospects or any market on any jobs related to the courses. Would a PhD be mandatory for any of these?
I have been also recommended in thinking about in doing Natural Sciences or Engineering.

P.S: a bit more info about myself.
I am finishing my first year in college, currently studying A-Level Chemistry, Biology and Geography.
I have relocated from a EU country about 5 years ago. Considering Brexit, i would expect less of job prospect.
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alleycat393
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(Original post by LonelyStarr)
I am currently on dilemma. I am unsure whether i want to do Biology, Chemistry and Biochemistry MSci. I do know what is going on each course however i want to know if there is any good career progression, job prospects or any market on any jobs related to the courses. Would a PhD be mandatory for any of these?
I have been also recommended in thinking about in doing Natural Sciences or Engineering.

P.S: a bit more info about myself.
I am finishing my first year in college, currently studying A-Level Chemistry, Biology and Geography.
I have relocated from a EU country about 5 years ago. Considering Brexit, i would expect less of job prospect.
Job prospects will be exactly the same. If you plan to stay in science you will need further study.
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LonelyStarr
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(Original post by alleycat393)
Job prospects will be exactly the same. If you plan to stay in science you will need further study.
to what extent? I am not sure what did you meant by this
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alleycat393
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(Original post by LonelyStarr)
to what extent? I am not sure what did you meant by this
To what extent what? Which bit confuses you?
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LonelyStarr
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(Original post by alleycat393)
To what extent what? Which bit confuses you?
"you will need further study". For example, If I want to work on a Lab would i need a PhD? Or would that be overqualified?
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alleycat393
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(Original post by LonelyStarr)
"you will need further study". For example, If I want to work on a Lab would i need a PhD? Or would that be overqualified?
Hun if you plan to work in a lab and achieve career development a Phd is the minimum requirement.
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LonelyStarr
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(Original post by alleycat393)
Hun if you plan to work in a lab and achieve career development a Phd is the minimum requirement.
Ok thanks babe. Is that for engineering too?
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swanseajack1
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visit some opendays in the summer so you get more information about each subject before applying.
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alleycat393
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(Original post by LonelyStarr)
Ok thanks. Is that for engineering too?
Depends on where you want to work. Engineering career paths are very different and unless you plan to work in engineering research you may just need a masters if anything. Maybe do some research first. Good luck!
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LonelyStarr
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(Original post by swanseajack1)
visit some opendays in the summer so you get more information about each subject before applying.
ok i will do
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IronSwift
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(Original post by LonelyStarr)
I am currently on dilemma. I am unsure whether i want to do Biology, Chemistry and Biochemistry MSci. I do know what is going on each course however i want to know if there is any good career progression, job prospects or any market on any jobs related to the courses. Would a PhD be mandatory for any of these?
I have been also recommended in thinking about in doing Natural Sciences or Engineering.

P.S: a bit more info about myself.
I am finishing my first year in college, currently studying A-Level Chemistry, Biology and Geography.
I have relocated from a EU country about 5 years ago. Considering Brexit, i would expect less of job prospect.
Hey, just do what makes you happy. That's the most important thing, no matter what else happens after.
I'm sure you can easily get a Study Visa even if brexit goes through, since you've lived here for 5 years and you've obvs got good prospects since you're hopefully going to university. Then you can become a permanent resident since you'll be well-qualified and good for the economy.
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LonelyStarr
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(Original post by IronSwift)
Hey, just do what makes you happy. That's the most important thing, no matter what else happens after.
I'm sure you can easily get a Study Visa even if brexit goes through, since you've lived here for 5 years and you've obvs got good prospects since you're hopefully going to university. Then you can become a permanent resident since you'll be well-qualified and good for the economy.
Sounds about good, thank you
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BTAnonymous
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(Original post by LonelyStarr)
See, that was completely unnecessary.
You're clearly unsure as you what you want to do because you're thinking about engineering but then jumping to natural sciences? I'd suggest to do a thorough amount of research before applying for a course and narrowing down to 1 choice only.

What will happen is you will choose, engineering for example, and then quickly find out that the course isn't for you and you've made a huge mistake; uh oh. Big mistake. You've not only wasted your tuition fees but also time.

Engineering is completely different to natural sciences; if you want to do engineering, also consider degree apprenticeships.
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LonelyStarr
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(Original post by BTAnonymous)
You're clearly unsure as you what you want to do because you're thinking about engineering but then jumping to natural sciences? I'd suggest to do a thorough amount of research before applying for a course and narrowing down to 1 choice only.

What will happen is you will choose, engineering for example, and then quickly find out that the course isn't for you and you've made a huge mistake; uh oh. Big mistake. You've not only wasted your tuition fees but also time.

Engineering is completely different to natural sciences; if you want to do engineering, also consider degree apprenticeships.
Therefore that is why i asked you the questions related to the different markets, prospects, career progression.
Again, this why i am asking you the questions to avoid any wrongful selections. Sorry if i have not been explicit enough, by engineering i mean chemical engineering.

Thanks for the info.
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BTAnonymous
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(Original post by LonelyStarr)
Therefore that is why i asked you the questions related to the different markets, prospects, career progression.
Again, this why i am asking you the questions to avoid any wrongful selections. Sorry if i have not been explicit enough, by engineering i mean chemical engineering.

Thanks for the info.
Any engineering discipline is good (chemical is very highly regarded) but it's not a degree you do just for job prospects. You not only need to have some practical aptitude but you need to have a good set of soft skills. Without these, your job prospects if you're looking for an engineering role, even with a chemical engineering degree are not good which is why a lot of engineering companies reject engineering grads because they lack soft and practical skills. So you need to ask yourself "Am I really a natural engineering, am I a naturally practical person? Or am I just doing the degree for the prospects and money?". If you answer yes to the latter, definitely do not do engineering.

If you rule out engineering then, but you're interested in sciences but don't want to do a PhD, then at least you've narrowed it down to the natural sciences. Doing an MSci degree will be a nice addition to your job prospects as long as you can demonstrate great potential to employers by utilising a masters degree opportunities.

I recommend you start looking at careers you're interested in doing NOW so you can take also take the required qualifications before you make the mistake of starting a degree and then finding a job you'll absolute love but you've done the wrong degree (there's not a single degree which is able to open doors to every job.)
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LonelyStarr
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(Original post by BTAnonymous)
Any engineering discipline is good (chemical is very highly regarded) but it's not a degree you do just for job prospects. You not only need to have some practical aptitude but you need to have a good set of soft skills. Without these, your job prospects if you're looking for an engineering role, even with a chemical engineering degree are not good which is why a lot of engineering companies reject engineering grads because they lack soft and practical skills. So you need to ask yourself "Am I really a natural engineering, am I a naturally practical person? Or am I just doing the degree for the prospects and money?". If you answer yes to the latter, definitely do not do engineering.

If you rule out engineering then, but you're interested in sciences but don't want to do a PhD, then at least you've narrowed it down to the natural sciences. Doing an MSci degree will be a nice addition to your job prospects as long as you can demonstrate great potential to employers by utilising a masters degree opportunities.

I recommend you start looking at careers you're interested in doing NOW so you can take also take the required qualifications before you make the mistake of starting a degree and then finding a job you'll absolute love but you've done the wrong degree (there's not a single degree which is able to open doors to every job.)
Right, that is good. Going back to the second point that you said about don't want to do a PhD. Say that i have narrowed it down to a MSci in Chemistry plus a Year In Industry. Would that bring a nice addition to my job prospects? Including the fact there is experience on my degree?

And one last question. Do you any careers related to Natural Science too? Because i found most to be very unrelated broad careers.

P.S:
I am aware that if I do Biochemistry, a PhD would be a suitable option to go down that route.
Thanks.
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artful_lounger
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Biology, Chemistry, and Biochemistry are all pretty distinct degree courses. Most Biochemistry courses have more in common with a Biology degree (and A-level Biology) in terms of "fundamental biosciences" i.e. molecular and cell biology, genetics, biochemistry as it relates to protein structure and function, physiology (especially metabolism) and so on. On the other hand, most degrees denoted "Biology" tend to skew towards the ecological/organismal side than the biomolecular sciences side, although inevitably you will cover some of the same core material.

If you know your interest in the biosciences is on the "fundamental" side as described above, but you aren't sure if you want a more chemically oriented course or not, you may want to consider a joint/combined course in Chemistry and/with Biochemistry (or vice versa), or a Biochemistry course which has a large core chemistry content (like at Oxford), if not a Natural Sciences course. "Biology" as above, where not otherwise specified further, tends to focus more on the ecological/organismal side of things - you may want to compare the course in Biology and Biochemistry at e.g. Southampton and Oxford to see the different perspectives the courses typically have.

Chemical Engineering has very little in common with even a Chemistry degree, much less a Biology degree. The above advice regarding engineering generally applies equally to ChemE. There are a small number of ChemE courses which allow you to pursue chemistry as a "minor" subject (usually denoted "Chemical Engineering with [Medicinal/Applied/Industrial] Chemistry") however, but in general ChemE have more in common with Engineering broadly, or perhaps (Applied) Mathematics, than with Chemistry proper.
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BTAnonymous
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(Original post by LonelyStarr)
Right, that is good. Going back to the second point that you said about don't want to do a PhD. Say that i have narrowed it down to a MSci in Chemistry plus a Year In Industry. Would that bring a nice addition to my job prospects? Including the fact there is experience on my degree?

And one last question. Do you any careers related to Natural Science too? Because i found most to be very unrelated broad careers.

P.S:
I am aware that if I do Biochemistry, a PhD would be a suitable option to go down that route.
Thanks.
A year in industry would be very nice, especially if it's with a well regarded company (who you could even get a job with).

Yes, that is true. The natural sciences do not have many related careers in the broader sense of the world. However, a lot of people myself included, enjoy studying a science degree but we're not interested enough to do further study and research. I really enjoy learning about physics but I wouldn't do a PhD in it which is why I would like to work in a Big Four company.

Natural science students do tend to go onto further study more than other subjects but you will find that there are a huge range of opportunities as a natural science graduate. Many go into finance, civil service (MI6 + GCHQ will be popular for physics and maths students), teaching, energy et cetra. There are plenty of opportunities, it just takes a fair bit of research.

If you're interested in biology and chemistry, a company which springs to mind is GSK; a biomedical company so take a look.
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