[Exam Jam] English Quotes Revision Game Watch

04MR17
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Welcome to the English Quotes Revision Game.:woo:


This thread is part of Exam Jam 2018.

The way this game works is simple.

1. Pick a quote from one of the texts you're studying.

2. Post it in the thread

3. The person below has to do some analysis of it (even if you haven't studied that text).

4. They follow that analysis with a quote of their own, and so the game continues.


This is good prep for unseen sections of any of your exams.

If you're studying English language then see if you can spot and name any particular techniques used (it's alright if there aren't any).

If the quote is quite large, focus on a small part of it.
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She-Ra
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Shall we kick off with Romeo and Juliet?

GCSE Romeo + Juliet

Read the following extract from Act 1 Scene 1 of Romeo and Juliet and then answer the question that follows.

At this point in the play, the male servants of the house of Capulet have seen the male servants from the house of Montague and a fight is about to start.

SAMPSON My naked weapon is out. Quarrel, I will back thee.
GREGORY How, turn thy back and run?
SAMPSON Fear me not.
GREGORY No, marry, I fear thee!
SAMPSON 5 Let us take the law of our sides, let them begin.
GREGORY I will frown as I pass by, and let them take it as they list.
SAMPSON Nay, as they dare. I will bite my thumb at them, which is disgrace to them if they bear it.
ABRAM Do you bite your thumb at us, sir?
SAMPSON 10 I do bite my thumb, sir.
ABRAM Do you bite your thumb at us, sir?
SAMPSON [Aside to Gregory] Is the law of our side if I say ay?
GREGORY [Aside to Sampson] No.
SAMPSON No, sir, I do not bite my thumb at you, sir, but I bite my thumb, sir.

Starting with this conversation, explore how Shakespeare presents aggressive male behaviour in Romeo and Juliet.

Write about:
• how Shakespeare presents aggressive male behaviour in this conversation
• how Shakespeare presents aggressive male behaviour in the play as a whole.

We can bullet point ideas
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She-Ra
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As a warm up here is my initial thoughts...

- Biting the thumb is insulting - in this day it would be the same as flipping the middle finger at someone
- Trying to wind one another up
- Introduces the boyish conflict between the Montegues and Capulets
- Language is snide. said with the intent to start a quarrel.
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Ara8311a
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THE GREAT GATSBY

'So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past'


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Evil Homer
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(Original post by Ara8311a)





THE GREAT GATSBY

'So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past'






Quite possibly a very basic understanding, but this seems to imply that it is impossible to escape our pasts:

  • "Beat on" - implying a rowing/paddling action, implying a sense of great intention and effort.
  • "boats against the current" - Symbolising that although there is a great effort, it is an ultimately pointless en-devour.
  • "Ceaselessly into our past" - Implies a constant effort, a constant back and forth, or trying to move on with life, but always being brought back to your past.

Like I said, a very basic understanding and I may be missing some greater symbolism as It has been a few years since I read the book. What do you think?
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Ara8311a
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(Original post by Evil Homer)
Quite possibly a very basic understanding, but this seems to imply that it is impossible to escape our pasts:

  • "Beat on" - implying a rowing/paddling action, implying a sense of great intention and effort.
  • "boats against the current" - Symbolising that although there is a great effort, it is an ultimately pointless en-devour.
  • "Ceaselessly into our past" - Implies a constant effort, a constant back and forth, or trying to move on with life, but always being brought back to your past.

Like I said, a very basic understanding and I may be missing some greater symbolism as It has been a few years since I read the book. What do you think?
No, it sounds great! Better than the rambling I did in class the other day when my teacher threw it at me
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Deliciate
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lol I had to analyse this for homework:

A sense of collective perseverance is established with pronoun ‘so we’ as it demonstrates the conflicted tie between those living in the American society; the American dream is a universal ambition and yet a universal failure. It is the visual imagery of a united American nation all sailing towards a common goal, despite sociological differences, that truly causes the words to penetrate beneath appearances. The irony however is that the only thread that ties the American society together is ultimately a purposeless drift towards artificial happiness. After all, how does one know when true happiness has been achieved when the lines between happiness and materialism have been so heavily blurred?

The potentially futile pursuit of ‘beat[ing] on’ and rowing forwards against a tide that takes them backwards may yet be considered admirable. The quest is still celebrated despite the fact that history renders such ideals as inaccessible. This is such a poignant metaphor for the realist novel, where a character heroically struggles against the historical forces of plot. Perhaps on a critical level, Fitzgerald is hinting at the struggle between philosophical and historical truth, the struggle between the ‘boats’ and the ‘current’, the struggle between transcendentalism and nature.

The reference earlier in the novel to the ‘boat that looked like a house’ in which Gatsby lived in alludes to a sense of predestination. There is a cyclical tie between the ‘boat’ earlier in the novel and the ‘boat’ at the end. Gatsby still remains in a ‘boat’, a simple object lacking the extravagance or sophistication of a ship or yacht. Even though he has denied his identity, in essence he still remains the same -- he’s still wandering purposelessly in the waters till the very end echoing the driftless nature of the lost generation. Despite the illusions of grandeur he upholds, he hasn’t transformed and ultimately remains ‘shiftless’. Fitzgerald could indeed be indicting the American Dream in failing to provide realistic mechanisms for social mobility. This then pushes the American society into a corner with only their imagination to help them escape.

On the surface, the verb ‘borne’ demonstrates the action of all efforts being adrift. However, from a deeper level, it could allude to the ‘heavy burden’ of the past that incessantly lingers despite all efforts to move forwards. In this case, life is only an illusion of forward progress. This is because as we move into the future, everything that is done instantly turns into our past. Fitzgerald therefore hints that when the desire to recapture an idealized past, to freeze and preserve a perfect moment or memory, becomes your sole ambition, it leads to ruin. Extending upon the idea of burdens, there are subtle biblical parallels between Gatsby and Jesus. Parallel to Jesus, Gatsby dies for the sins of the people he loved so that they could have the potential to lead the lives they craved. This evolution into martyrdom climaxes when Nick asks Gatsby, “Was Daisy driving” and Gatsby selflessly answers, “Yes…but of course I’ll say I was”. In this moment, Gatsby takes responsibility for a crime he did not commit, Myrtle’s murder, and pays for this feigned, sinful confession with a sensory death.
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Ara8311a
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(Original post by Deliciate)
lol I had to analyse this for homework:

A sense of collective perseverance is established with pronoun ‘so we’ as it demonstrates the conflicted tie between those living in the American society; the American dream is a universal ambition and yet a universal failure. It is the visual imagery of a united American nation all sailing towards a common goal, despite sociological differences, that truly causes the words to penetrate beneath appearances. The irony however is that the only thread that ties the American society together is ultimately a purposeless drift towards artificial happiness. After all, how does one know when true happiness has been achieved when the lines between happiness and materialism have been so heavily blurred?

The potentially futile pursuit of ‘beat[ing] on’ and rowing forwards against a tide that takes them backwards may yet be considered admirable. The quest is still celebrated despite the fact that history renders such ideals as inaccessible. This is such a poignant metaphor for the realist novel, where a character heroically struggles against the historical forces of plot. Perhaps on a critical level, Fitzgerald is hinting at the struggle between philosophical and historical truth, the struggle between the ‘boats’ and the ‘current’, the struggle between transcendentalism and nature.

The reference earlier in the novel to the ‘boat that looked like a house’ in which Gatsby lived in alludes to a sense of predestination. There is a cyclical tie between the ‘boat’ earlier in the novel and the ‘boat’ at the end. Gatsby still remains in a ‘boat’, a simple object lacking the extravagance or sophistication of a ship or yacht. Even though he has denied his identity, in essence he still remains the same -- he’s still wandering purposelessly in the waters till the very end echoing the driftless nature of the lost generation. Despite the illusions of grandeur he upholds, he hasn’t transformed and ultimately remains ‘shiftless’. Fitzgerald could indeed be indicting the American Dream in failing to provide realistic mechanisms for social mobility. This then pushes the American society into a corner with only their imagination to help them escape.

On the surface, the verb ‘borne’ demonstrates the action of all efforts being adrift. However, from a deeper level, it could allude to the ‘heavy burden’ of the past that incessantly lingers despite all efforts to move forwards. In this case, life is only an illusion of forward progress. This is because as we move into the future, everything that is done instantly turns into our past. Fitzgerald therefore hints that when the desire to recapture an idealized past, to freeze and preserve a perfect moment or memory, becomes your sole ambition, it leads to ruin. Extending upon the idea of burdens, there are subtle biblical parallels between Gatsby and Jesus. Parallel to Jesus, Gatsby dies for the sins of the people he loved so that they could have the potential to lead the lives they craved. This evolution into martyrdom climaxes when Nick asks Gatsby, “Was Daisy driving” and Gatsby selflessly answers, “Yes…but of course I’ll say I was”. In this moment, Gatsby takes responsibility for a crime he did not commit, Myrtle’s murder, and pays for this feigned, sinful confession with a sensory death.
Seriously impressive analysis...! :woohoo:
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She-Ra
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(Original post by Deliciate)
lol I had to analyse this for homework:

A sense of collective perseverance is established with pronoun ‘so we’ as it demonstrates the conflicted tie between those living in the American society; the American dream is a universal ambition and yet a universal failure. It is the visual imagery of a united American nation all sailing towards a common goal, despite sociological differences, that truly causes the words to penetrate beneath appearances. The irony however is that the only thread that ties the American society together is ultimately a purposeless drift towards artificial happiness. After all, how does one know when true happiness has been achieved when the lines between happiness and materialism have been so heavily blurred?

The potentially futile pursuit of ‘beat[ing] on’ and rowing forwards against a tide that takes them backwards may yet be considered admirable. The quest is still celebrated despite the fact that history renders such ideals as inaccessible. This is such a poignant metaphor for the realist novel, where a character heroically struggles against the historical forces of plot. Perhaps on a critical level, Fitzgerald is hinting at the struggle between philosophical and historical truth, the struggle between the ‘boats’ and the ‘current’, the struggle between transcendentalism and nature.

The reference earlier in the novel to the ‘boat that looked like a house’ in which Gatsby lived in alludes to a sense of predestination. There is a cyclical tie between the ‘boat’ earlier in the novel and the ‘boat’ at the end. Gatsby still remains in a ‘boat’, a simple object lacking the extravagance or sophistication of a ship or yacht. Even though he has denied his identity, in essence he still remains the same -- he’s still wandering purposelessly in the waters till the very end echoing the driftless nature of the lost generation. Despite the illusions of grandeur he upholds, he hasn’t transformed and ultimately remains ‘shiftless’. Fitzgerald could indeed be indicting the American Dream in failing to provide realistic mechanisms for social mobility. This then pushes the American society into a corner with only their imagination to help them escape.

On the surface, the verb ‘borne’ demonstrates the action of all efforts being adrift. However, from a deeper level, it could allude to the ‘heavy burden’ of the past that incessantly lingers despite all efforts to move forwards. In this case, life is only an illusion of forward progress. This is because as we move into the future, everything that is done instantly turns into our past. Fitzgerald therefore hints that when the desire to recapture an idealized past, to freeze and preserve a perfect moment or memory, becomes your sole ambition, it leads to ruin. Extending upon the idea of burdens, there are subtle biblical parallels between Gatsby and Jesus. Parallel to Jesus, Gatsby dies for the sins of the people he loved so that they could have the potential to lead the lives they craved. This evolution into martyrdom climaxes when Nick asks Gatsby, “Was Daisy driving” and Gatsby selflessly answers, “Yes…but of course I’ll say I was”. In this moment, Gatsby takes responsibility for a crime he did not commit, Myrtle’s murder, and pays for this feigned, sinful confession with a sensory death.
This is amazing!
What's your quote to continue the game?

(Original post by Ara8311a)
Seriously impressive analysis...! :woohoo:
My mind is blown!
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Deliciate
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Ah thank you

"Her delicate beauty must avoid a strong light. There is something about her uncertain manner, as well as her white clothes, that suggests a moth."
- A Streetcar Named Desire, Tennessee Williams
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(Original post by Deliciate)
Ah thank you

"Her delicate beauty must avoid a strong light. There is something about her uncertain manner, as well as her white clothes, that suggests a moth."
- A Streetcar Named Desire, Tennessee Williams
I read Streetcar for my coursework

It's talking about Blanche and her physical appearance reflects her personality. The connotations of "delicate" add to the audience's impression that she is a fragile character and influence our perception of her mental state. This is reflected in "her uncertain manner" which would convey a sense of nervousness to the audience. The extended image of Blanche as a "moth" and her correlation to "light" imitates the idea that she is a character who needs to be shielded from the outside world due to her inability to cope with it. "White" often acts as a symbol for innocent and here is an example of Williams' implicit irony. Although it could be seen as a further example of her fragility, we are also aware, by the end of the play, of her lack of sexual innocence. Therfore the "white clothes" serve to provide us with a dual meaning.

BOOM!!! *totally amateur response
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HAMLET


GERTRUDE: Oh Hamlet, thou has cleft my heart in twain.
HAMLET: Oh throw away the worser part of it/ And live the purer with the other half
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She-Ra
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(Original post by Ara8311a)



HAMLET




GERTRUDE: Oh Hamlet, thou has cleft my heart in twain.
HAMLET: Oh throw away the worser part of it/ And live the purer with the other half
OK, so I have never studied Hamlet or seen it but I believe Gertrude here is saying that Hamlet has broken her heart in two?

Is Hamlet saying that she must let go of what has happened? The "worser part" and build new beginnings from the purer half?
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Zaspo
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I don't need any literature quotes because my exams are over for gcse literature.
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AHH English Lit! :zomg: Get it away! Get it away! Get it away from me! :sick:
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She-Ra
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(Original post by Zaspo)
I don't need any literature quotes because my exams are over for gcse literature.
What exams do you have after half term?
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Ara8311a
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(Original post by She-Ra)
OK, so I have never studied Hamlet or seen it but I believe Gertrude here is saying that Hamlet has broken her heart in two?

Is Hamlet saying that she must let go of what has happened? The "worser part" and build new beginnings from the purer half?
Yeah, looking back, it was kind of a random quote to choose. You basically got it. Gertrude has just been confronted by Hamlet who believes she has acted licentiously by marrying Claudius so soon after his father died. She's realised what she's done wrong and Hamlet is saying to throw away the "worser part" which is filled with sin and instead build a purer life. I would speak about morality and stuff. Maybe also about how imagery is being used to express emotion and the tone.
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(Original post by She-Ra)
What exams do you have after half term?
English language and maths and science and etc
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She-Ra
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(Original post by Ara8311a)
Yeah, looking back, it was kind of a random quote to choose. You basically got it. Gertrude has just been confronted by Hamlet who believes she has acted licentiously by marrying Claudius so soon after his father died. She's realised what she's done wrong and Hamlet is saying to throw away the "worser part" which is filled with sin and instead build a purer life. I would speak about morality and stuff. Maybe also about how imagery is being used to express emotion and the tone.
This sounds absolutely spot on.

Yes, there is a lot of context around morality. It also insinuates that she made the decision with her heart and that was a silly thing to do - so simple throw that part of your heart away. It's impure and as good as useless. So yes the masculine tone of Hamlet, ridiculing her choices that he feels like has been made in a feminine way perhaps....

At the time most marriages were strategic alliances and women had little or no choice in who they were married too.
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She-Ra
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(Original post by Zaspo)
English language and maths and science and etc
Ok great, we focusing on physics tomorrow, Maths Thursday, Chemistry on Saturday as part of this Exam Jam event.
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