Where to study environmental science? Watch

beth14062001
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don't know which unis to look at.
live in south on England, so don't really want to be travelling too far up north.
looking at UWE, Bristol, Exeter, Penryn Campus.

what other unis would b good to look round?
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artful_lounger
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The OES department at Southampton is excellent in general, and do a lot of work on various environmental science related issues. That said, Southampton's Environmental Science course specifically is not in OES, and is more policy oriented as I can tell...so your mileage may vary there. However if you are interested in issues regarding e.g. climate change, ecology and conservation and so on, their Oceanography or for the latter in a broader sense Biology and Marine Biology courses have a lot to offer.

UCL's Environmental Geoscience course may be worth considering, although naturally given the content will slightly skew towards the earth sciences side (similar to the OES courses which skew to the earth and especially ocean sciences side - however ocean science is pretty tightly related to climate science, and broader ecological issues, so it's very relevant if that is your area of interest as above). The UCL tag is also not a bad thing to have on your CV...

Plymouth is home to one of the major climate/marine labs in the UK if I recall correctly, although I know little about either the course or the university other than general impressions of the latter otherwise. UEA also has a fair amount of climate oriented stuff available to undergraduates, e.g. through their Natural Sciences course. Oxbridge may be worth considering depending on your background, with Earth Sciences or Biological Sciences (depending on your main area of interest0 being most relevant at Oxford and Natural Sciences at Cambridge offering many pathways.

The emphasis of these courses probably speaks more to my biases than anything else though
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morc13
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Have you considered studying a degree such as physics, chemistry or biology and then doing a masters in environmental science? I just think it would keep more options open. But that's just my opinion. You can go into environmental science from these fields whereas I presume that it's harder to go into these fields with a degree in environmental science. Assuming it's research your interested in.
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beth14062001
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
The OES department at Southampton is excellent in general, and do a lot of work on various environmental science related issues. That said, Southampton's Environmental Science course specifically is not in OES, and is more policy oriented as I can tell...so your mileage may vary there. However if you are interested in issues regarding e.g. climate change, ecology and conservation and so on, their Oceanography or for the latter in a broader sense Biology and Marine Biology courses have a lot to offer.

UCL's Environmental Geoscience course may be worth considering, although naturally given the content will slightly skew towards the earth sciences side (similar to the OES courses which skew to the earth and especially ocean sciences side - however ocean science is pretty tightly related to climate science, and broader ecological issues, so it's very relevant if that is your area of interest as above). The UCL tag is also not a bad thing to have on your CV...

Plymouth is home to one of the major climate/marine labs in the UK if I recall correctly, although I know little about either the course or the university other than general impressions of the latter otherwise. UEA also has a fair amount of climate oriented stuff available to undergraduates, e.g. through their Natural Sciences course. Oxbridge may be worth considering depending on your background, with Earth Sciences or Biological Sciences (depending on your main area of interest0 being most relevant at Oxford and Natural Sciences at Cambridge offering many pathways.

The emphasis of these courses probably speaks more to my biases than anything else though
Thankyou! I'm planning on going to. uni at least 2 hours from home as I defiantly want to be quite fr from home, just visiting the uni's is the issue which being too far up north.

All these degrees sound really interesting and climate change and oceanology defiantly interest me the most and more than conservation. I have been looking at Exeter penryn Campus, have you heard anything about this course?

I will defiantly look into UEA and Plymouth.

My target grades are A, B, B so i won't be looking at oxbridge.

Thanks for your help
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by beth14062001)
Thankyou! I'm planning on going to. uni at least 2 hours from home as I defiantly want to be quite fr from home, just visiting the uni's is the issue which being too far up north.

All these degrees sound really interesting and climate change and oceanology defiantly interest me the most and more than conservation. I have been looking at Exeter penryn Campus, have you heard anything about this course?

I will defiantly look into UEA and Plymouth.

My target grades are A, B, B so i won't be looking at oxbridge.

Thanks for your help
I have two friends who did degrees at the Exeter Cornwall campus and both seemed to really enjoy it. Neither course was directly in environmental science however as with most courses offered on the Cornwall campus, they were environmental related (one did Geography and the other Renewable Energy).

Which courses are most relevant depend somewhat on your background though - what subjects are you taking? Many of the courses I noted required one or more science subjects (some accept Geography alongside a science subject if it requires two though; some require Maths either to a specific grade at GCSE, or at A-level).

However Southampton has a Science Foundation Year which links to the Environmental Science course as well as all the OES courses except Geophysics (which is connected to their other foundation year) and if you don't have appropriate background in French, the "with French" course(s). Also I believe it doesn't automatically progress to the courses with international study, although it's possible you can transfer to those after starting (?).
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