how does one say "penchant" and "homage"? Watch

halátnost
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#41
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#41
(Original post by *pitseleh*)
^ Yeah, haha - I used to have a teacher who pronounced "vehicle" is vay-ickle, instead of vee-ickle. Heh.

I really don't like it when people pronounce "vase" as vayze or (worse) vorze.

haha, vay-ickle. I actually also had a teacher who did that! And it used to crack me up. She also said appre-SEE-eight for appreciate, which I know some people do but i do more of she in the middle as opposed to see. She also said converZEEshun for conversation. I was like, it's an S not a Z!

Agree with u on vayze, again i think it's an American think. Like route = row't, to rhyme with about.
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Hylean
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#42
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(Original post by Taemon)
Um... I think it actually has a cedilla on it... but that's just me being picky.

And to all those that say that they are originally French words, and thus deserve to be pronounced in the French way, does that mean that one should pronounce image, imaage. After all, it does come from French.
Nah, that was just me not knowing the word exactly, it's been a long time since I spoke any language where that accent is used frequently.
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xxxchrisxxx
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#43
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#43
(Original post by RosiePosiePuddingAndPie)
I have a friend who speaks faux french all the time! He says 'noo-garrr' for 'nougat', which I can accept, but he just takes the piss when he calls Crunchie Nuggets 'Crunchie Noogarrrr' - it's nug-it not noooogarrrrrrr!! Lol!

I would say them how you suggested second - "pen-shent" and "ho-mage"

I literally LOLed at your friend's story. I have a friend who says Pret A Manger as "pretter-manger" (rhymes with stranger). I had to ask him to repeat it to confirm what he was referring to.
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*pitseleh*
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#44
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(Original post by halátnost)
haha, vay-ickle. I actually also had a teacher who did that! And it used to crack me up. She also said appre-SEE-eight for appreciate, which I know some people do but i do more of she in the middle as opposed to see. She also said converZEEshun for conversation. I was like, it's an S not a Z!

Agree with u on vayze, again i think it's an American think. Like route = row't, to rhyme with about.
Hahaha.. oh yes, I actually think the vay-ickle teacher may also have been an appree-see-eight culprit as well.
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halátnost
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Oh and can I just clarify this...I would say that the groin area on trousers is the "crotch". I heard a girl in Topshop talking about the "crutch of the pants"?!?!?
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Jelkin
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#46
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(Original post by Fluent in Lies)
I've never known anyone mispronouce those.

What do they say? Noo-gat? Gill-it?
Nugget and gillet. Ugh.

My dad always calls Croatia "Cro-asia," but that's a different thing I suppose. He doesn't mean to.
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Glutamic Acid
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#47
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Pen-chahnt and hom - idge.

I'm no Frenchy.
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halátnost
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#48
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(Original post by *pitseleh*)
Hahaha.. oh yes, I actually think the vay-ickle teacher may also have been an appree-see-eight culprit as well.

lol. (probably same one...moves about to try and integrate their pronunciation into general UK wide lexicon...it ain't never gonna happen!).
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Fluent in Lies
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(Original post by Jelkin)
Nugget and gillet. Ugh.

My dad always calls Croatia "Cro-asia," but that's a different thing I suppose. He doesn't mean to.
Nugget? wtf? I'd slap them.
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*pitseleh*
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(Original post by halátnost)
lol. (probably same one...moves about to try and integrate their pronunciation into general UK wide lexicon...it ain't never gonna happen!).
Was she a very nice, quietly-spoken lady called Mrs Lewis, by any chance? :laugh:
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Naranoc
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#51
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Pen-chant...pension...peasant.

Pon-shon sounds too delicate. Not too fussed about pronunciation - I've embarassed myself enough times in class by saying completely the wrong thing. My worst offence has to be "linger-ey" instead of "lingerie"...
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brightxburns
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#52
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I say homage like 'hom-uhj' because it simply sounds TOO pretentious to say 'om-ahhj'
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Kolya
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#53
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(Original post by Ilora-Danon)
As far as I'm concerned, in order to communicate effectively one must be intelligent enough to know how to pronounce the words one is using, otherwise one shouldn't use them at all. D
You missed the point: There is no objectively correct way to pronounce words. Pronunciation and accents have a large and wonderful range of variety, and we should support that variety because of the life it brings to language. Unfortunately, I find that most spelling, punctuation and pronunciation pedants have created artificial "rules" when using language; I fear they use it as a reason to feel superior to others. Many of the "rules" they create are often applied illogically and are confusing, even though the purpose of language is to communicate. Some examples that I will give are: the use of -ise/-ize endings, the use of Latin plurals, and the "correctness" of a 'BBC accent'. So my advice to the OP would be this: Pronounce them in whichever way makes you feel comfortable and can be easily understood by the people you meet in your everyday life.
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halátnost
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#54
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(Original post by *pitseleh*)
Was she a very nice, quietly-spoken lady called Mrs Lewis, by any chance? :laugh:

Dammit, there's two of them! :eek: Either there has been a teacher-mitosis or word is spreading! (Or, in particular, the word Appreeseeeight is spreading). Ah! And also! I say self-deprecating (self Dep'ri'cayting), she used to say self depreciating (or, in this case, self deepreeseeeighting). Honestly, sometimes I wondered if she was an English teacher at all...:p:

ps. your scarf in your profile picture is gorgeous. is that from the Cotswolds too? (*reaches for shopping list entitled To Buy in the Cotswolds...1. fit mini Snape...*).
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Dalimyr
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(Original post by Hylean)
To be fair, I know the word has a cecilla on it, but I don't have that on my keyboard and ain't opening MS Word just to get it.
Don't worry about it The word appears both with and without a cedilla over here, so I was just making a point to help my case later about the English *******ising words as well. I wasn't specifically picking on you
And you don't need MS Word, Character Map or any of those programs to get ç if you don't have an AZERTY keyboard - hit Alt+0231 and you'll get it I use these shortcuts a lot (particularly things like é), so I know quite a few of them off by heart.

God, I'm going to get REALLY picky if I stay here much longer
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shyopstv
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#56
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French way for "penchant" and for homage, I say it the french way but pronounce the h which doesn't seem to be the case for some of you :confused:

(Original post by Dalimyr)
When I studied German in my first year of uni, it made me giggle a bit that simply by the way people said "ich" (the german word for "I"), I could tell if they were English or American, and not going by their accent :p: The "ch" in "ich" is pronounced similarly to that in "loch", so Scots rarely have a problem with it, but it is IMMENSELY common for the English to pronounce it as "ick" and for Americans to *******ise it further by saying "itch", both of which are incorrect.
To my amazement, http://encarta.msn.com/dictionary_1861699285/loch.html actually gives the correct pronunciation, even though it is American :p:
When I was teaching myself, I was pronouncing it as "ish" for ages Though that does sound a lot better than "itch"
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*pitseleh*
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(Original post by halátnost)
Dammit, there's two of them! :eek: Either there has been a teacher-mitosis or word is spreading! (Or, in particular, the word Appreeseeeight is spreading). Ah! And also! I say self-deprecating (self Dep'ri'cayting), she used to say self depreciating (or, in this case, self deepreeseeeighting). Honestly, sometimes I wondered if she was an English teacher at all...:p:

ps. your scarf in your profile picture is gorgeous. is that from the Cotswolds too? (*reaches for shopping list entitled To Buy in the Cotswolds...1. fit mini Snape...*).
Ahahahaha! :^_^:

Yes yes, I say "self-deprecating" the way you do (the proper way, of course ) too.

Aaand - thankyou! It is not from the Cotswolds though - it is from Marks and Spencers. I just looked on their website to see if they still have it, and they don't ... but they do have this one, which is very similar. Huzzah!
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halátnost
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(Original post by *pitseleh*)
Ahahahaha! :^_^:

Yes yes, I say "self-deprecating" the way you do (the proper way, of course ) too.

Aaand - thankyou! It is not from the Cotswolds though - it is from Marks and Spencers. I just looked on their website to see if they still have it, and they don't ... but they do have this one, which is very similar. Huzzah!
woop! Thank you. I have a thing for chunky knit scarves. And actually just chunky knit in general. I love the way M&S call that a "Chunky" Knit "Skinny" Scarf though, as if it was somewhat fluctuating in weight, in the middle of the Atkins diet or something. I think I will invest, cheers for that. I appreeseeeight it.
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*pitseleh*
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(Original post by halátnost)
woop! Thank you. I have a thing for chunky knit scarves. And actually just chunky knit in general. I love the way M&S call that a "Chunky" Knit "Skinny" Scarf though, as if it was somewhat fluctuating in weight, in the middle of the Atkins diet or something. I think I will invest, cheers for that. I appreeseeeight it.
Haha - you're welcome! And yes.. it is somewhat of a contradiction in terms - which makes it all the more worth possessing.
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FoeGeddaBowDeet
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I've never heard anybody say 'pon-shon' or 'o-mahj'!
Penchant and Homage!
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