navarre
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
So, as medical school draws to a finish- a journey I have loved- I think I may have found my niche.

Having become fascinated with sleep after reading the excellent Why We Sleep by Matthew Walker, and having had a few patients in my past few weeks in general practice with insomnia, I was wondering if I could specialise in sleep medicine? I'm vaguely aware that it may be an area of psychiatry, but not a psychiatric speciality in its own right in the UK.

Does anyone have any other information on routes into this fascinating area of medicine?
0
reply
Smile88egc
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
If you haven't got foundation jobs in anaesthetic, paediatrics and/or respiratory medicine then get yourself some taster days in these booked and try to do audit and quality improvement projects in these specialties.
Also read anything by Mike Farquhar who is an inspiring character in the field.
0
reply
navarre
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#3
(Original post by Smile88egc)
If you haven't got foundation jobs in anaesthetic, paediatrics and/or respiratory medicine then get yourself some taster days in these booked and try to do audit and quality improvement projects in these specialties.
Also read anything by Mike Farquhar who is an inspiring character in the field.
Haven't secured myself jobs in any of those specialties; however, I have managed to bag myself a rotation in child and adolescent psychiatry.
0
reply
Magendie
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 years ago
#4
(Original post by navarre)
So, as medical school draws to a finish- a journey I have loved- I think I may have found my niche.

Having become fascinated with sleep after reading the excellent Why We Sleep by Matthew Walker, and having had a few patients in my past few weeks in general practice with insomnia, I was wondering if I could specialise in sleep medicine? I'm vaguely aware that it may be an area of psychiatry, but not a psychiatric speciality in its own right in the UK.

Does anyone have any other information on routes into this fascinating area of medicine?
Most of them are neuro consultants I believe
0
reply
itsbrainsurgery
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#5
Report 2 years ago
#5
(Original post by navarre)
So, as medical school draws to a finish- a journey I have loved- I think I may have found my niche.

Having become fascinated with sleep after reading the excellent Why We Sleep by Matthew Walker, and having had a few patients in my past few weeks in general practice with insomnia, I was wondering if I could specialise in sleep medicine? I'm vaguely aware that it may be an area of psychiatry, but not a psychiatric speciality in its own right in the UK.

Does anyone have any other information on routes into this fascinating area of medicine?
@ecolier will advise but I think it is manly neurology. There will be input from other specialities like anaesthetics, respiratory, psychiatry and ENT.

It depends on what type of sleep disorders you are interested in - if it's airway obstruction leading to sleep problems then respiratory / ENT / anaesthetics is the way to go.

If it is things (which @ecolier find interesting) like narcolepsy and cataplexy, than it's neurology and then sub-specialise.

(Original post by Magendie)
Most of them are neuro consultants I believe
Yes!
0
reply
fishfacesimpson
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#6
Report 2 years ago
#6
Sleep apnoea is generally managed by respiratory physicians, mostly because of the need for cpap etc. Otherwise yes as above paroxysmal sleep disorders usually are managed by neurologists with an interest. Most big sleep units will have MDT approaches though. Neurophysiology is a possibility I suppose but not commonly
0
reply
Chief Wiggum
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#7
Report 2 years ago
#7
I thought it was done by Resp Physicians? Could be wrong though.
0
reply
navarre
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#8
(Original post by itsbrainsurgery)
@ecolier will advise but I think it is manly neurology. There will be input from other specialities like anaesthetics, respiratory, psychiatry and ENT.

It depends on what type of sleep disorders you are interested in - if it's airway obstruction leading to sleep problems then respiratory / ENT / anaesthetics is the way to go.

If it is things (which @ecolier find interesting) like narcolepsy and cataplexy, than it's neurology and then sub-specialise.



Yes!
Definitely more interested in the physiology and science of sleep and the interesting disorders like insomnia, nightmares, night terrors and cataplexy and the like, as opposed to the standard sleep apnoea, which bores me to tears.
0
reply
navarre
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#9
(Original post by fishfacesimpson)
Sleep apnoea is generally managed by respiratory physicians, mostly because of the need for cpap etc. Otherwise yes as above paroxysmal sleep disorders usually are managed by neurologists with an interest. Most big sleep units will have MDT approaches though. Neurophysiology is a possibility I suppose but not commonly
Luckily, I have a neurology job in F2 in addition to my psychiatry job in F1, so hopefully will be in a position to explore this more.
1
reply
username3884378
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#10
Report 2 years ago
#10
Do you have any specialists in your teaching hospital (or nearby)? There's always lots of 'I'm interested in X specialty, how do I get into it' posts on TSR, but there really is no better source of info than walking into a department and speaking directly to the people doing the job.

Not only does it get you accurate information, but it's a great chance to start networking. You can try to organise a taster session / week, get involved with an audit, speak to trainees...
0
reply
username3884378
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#11
Report 2 years ago
#11
I'm aware. I would still argue that getting to a nearby sleep centre would be less effort than most keen students expend getting to Royal Colleges down in London or up in Edinburgh, or attending conferences, etc.

Sleep medicine is not going to suddenly become 'un-niche'. There will be an associated effort required to explore it regardless of current medical school or future foundation deanery. One could even argue that for niche areas of medicine students / jnrs need to put in above average levels of effort to build a CV.

Let's say that there is no possible way to get access to a sleep centre. The OP can think laterally and go speak to neuro/resp consultants, tell them they're interested in sleep medicine, and ask if they know anyone in that field. It's a small world, they'll likely know someone. Send some cold call emails, ask for a shadow before F1 starts, etc.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Have you experienced financial difficulties as a student due to Covid-19?

Yes, I have really struggled financially (20)
13.25%
I have experienced some financial difficulties (42)
27.81%
I haven't experienced any financial difficulties and things have stayed the same (62)
41.06%
I have had better financial opportunities as a result of the pandemic (23)
15.23%
I've had another experience (let us know in the thread!) (4)
2.65%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed