Is Oxford really that biased against state schools? Watch

Cwlmatty
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I was really pleased when I got my Result for my AS's in Sep 2007...4 A's in English Literature, History, Geography and Biology. I almost immediatly applied to Oxford to Law; but was really dissapointed when I was refused without interveiw. I took the LNAT and although I realise that I got a lowly 16/30, considering I'm not practiced in critical thinking or coached for such a test I thought I did fairly well. I've found other people from private schools with worse marks that have still got an interveiw or even an offer.
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MOBA X
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yes they are
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Boolean Julian
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Private school students certianly do not take priority, if anything they're discriminated against. Of course I can't say exactly why you weren't interviewed - perhaps the college you applied to was particularly competitive that year? Also, did you have to submit written work? If you did, that's a major part of their decision whether to interview, so that may have been part of what let you down.
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Boolean Julian
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Also, I assume that by "public schools" you actually mean "state schools"? Since private schools and public schools are different words for the same thing.
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King of TSR
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Are you sure you mean "public" schools?

Public schools are basically private schools...

I think you are asking; is Oxford really that biased against state schools?

To which the answer is "NO"

Edit: Darn, beaten to it!
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Cwlmatty
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Sorry I mean 'state schools'
But Yeah.
I did'nt have to submit written work...i had to do an essay on LNAT
Just wish I could have like a reason why
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lemily
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The LNAT is not a test you can be coached for. That is the point of it. It is meant to give all pupils whatever previous education they have had an equal chance. It tests your underlying skills, not how well you can teach yourself to pass exams. Also, your personal statement might have a lot to do with it - your passion for law, work experience, pro-active steps to look into your future career (e.g. shadowing a barrister) etc. Both Oxford and Cambridge have, from what I have heard, fairly exemplary admissions departments and do take into account that state school pupils may not have had the same opportunities as private school pupils. If you feel you were held back in any way (i.e. went to a particularly poor school) you can apply for a special application where information from your local authority about your school is sent etc. Maybe you could try this next year....
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Cwlmatty
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Thankyou lemily ....
Although after taking the LNAT tests I did read about classes available in London on taking the courses. Surley a prestigious University would coach students for such test???
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Hasty
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"Surley a prestigious University would coach students for such test???"

It's in their interest not to, to see who can get the best scores on their own.
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Dann
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(Original post by Cwlmatty)
Surley a prestigious University would coach students for such test???
Wouldn't that rather defeat the object of the test...?
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Boolean Julian
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Classes coaching you for what's meant to be an aptitute test will probably be extortionately expensive and a load of useless *******s, just like those interview preparation crash courses.

Also, to be perfectly honest, personal statements aren't likely to be a make or break thing. My mother is an admissions tutor at Oxford and she tells me that all her colleagues claim to never pay any attention to personal statements.

Also, bear in mind that Oxford discriminate quite significantly pre-interview, unlikely Cambridge where almost all applicants are interviewed.
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lemily
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Well, it is meant to be un-coachable in that there is no specific knowledge to learn. I guess they could do practice papers but these are just practising analytical skills and writing skills. Skills they assume you have picked up either through life or previous education. It was invented because so many people were getting good grades and they had little to distinguish applicants. And also because so many "good" applicants were getting places and then were in fact incapable of writing an essay or doing research on their own as they had been so taught to the exam they had no real skills of their own (I know this is a sweeping generalisation and that it doesn't apply to that many people but it must have been enough to cause concern). The LNAT is meant to distinguish between those that learn the syllabus by rote and regurgitate from those who can analyse, argue and debate coherently and in a succinct fashion about anything in a short space of time. Great skills to have if you are going into law...
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North
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16/30 is really quite low the average is 17 the Lnat is an aptitude test you shouldn't be coached for it all you could really do was the practise paper

im from a state school i got in i dont think they care what school you are from more who you are
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*pitseleh*
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If public school pupils got in with lower grades than you, it would be because they were better than you in some other respect. I went to a state school, and I had 51/60 on the ELAT test (the equivalent of the LNAT for those applying to study English).. but I know of one private schoolgirl who had 58/60 and was still rejected. The admissions tests simply isn't the only thing that Oxford look at - that's all.
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superman19
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Yes i'm sure its bias and definately not your poor LNAT result. GCSE's play a big part too.
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henryt
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One of my friends scored pretty badly on the LNAT, though he was told at interview that his essays were outstanding and his multiple choice was relatively dire, and then continued to receive an offer. Perhaps Oxford place more emphasis on the Essay element, and so the score alone isn't indicative of how well you've done in Oxford's eyes?
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heliotrope
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they try to use positive discrimination to the benefit of state schools, but sadly it doesn't always work out perfectly. there are still too many people from public schools at oxford.
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Kolya
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(Original post by lemily)
The LNAT is not a test you can be coached for. That is the point of it. It is meant to give all pupils whatever previous education they have had an equal chance.
Come now: Of course you can be coached for the LNAT. I am confident that I could get at least 28/30 on the multiple-choice if I had fifteen minutes to take that section, and a good chance of getting higher if I could work at a slower pace. Now, what could explain this feat? A streak of genius? A unique ability for doing multiple-choice questions at a rapid speed? Alas, I have neither of those traits; I am just an average student who happened to study Critical Thinking, with some success, for two years at A-level. Emily, I see no reason why sufficient similar coaching of a student more naturally able than I would not produce the same, if not better, results.
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dulcificum
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Have you looked at the intake demographics recently?!
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Jimny
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(Original post by superman19)
Yes i'm sure its bias and definately not your poor LNAT result. GCSE's play a big part too.
I love sarcasm.
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