Jagodacott
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Hi, can someone help me write a simple step-by-step explanation of co-transport of glucose and sodium please?
I understand that they move together and that the sodium concentration is lower inside etc but I can’t seem to put it into words or find any useful diagram on google!

Thank you
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LiiHyde
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(Original post by Jagodacott)
Hi, can someone help me write a simple step-by-step explanation of co-transport of glucose and sodium please?
I understand that they move together and that the sodium concentration is lower inside etc but I can’t seem to put it into words or find any useful diagram on google!

Thank you
Challenge Accepted!

I may have over simplified but essentially

Sodium
Ileum to Cell: Facilitated Diffusion
Cell to Blood: Active Transport

Glucose
Ileum to Cell: Active transport
Cell to Blood: Facilitated Diffusion

Your explanation for every single process will be to do with the concentration gradient!

Don't try and over think co-transport it's just fancier than normal carrier proteins 'cus it's one protein doing both active transport and facilitated diffusion.
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Jagodacott
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Thank you so much!!
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LiiHyde
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You're very welcome, it's good revision for me too!
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Jpw1097
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(Original post by Jagodacott)
Hi, can someone help me write a simple step-by-step explanation of co-transport of glucose and sodium please?
I understand that they move together and that the sodium concentration is lower inside etc but I can’t seem to put it into words or find any useful diagram on google!

Thank you
Na+ ions within the cell are pumped out of the cell into the blood/interstitium via the Na+/K+-ATPase (sodium-potassium pump) in exchange for K+. This causes the Na+ concentration in the cell to fall, such that it is lower than the Na+ concentration in the gut or kidney tubule lumen - this sets up an electrochemical gradient. Therefore Na+ ions in the gut/kidney tubule lumen now move into the cell down their electrochemical gradient. This movement of Na+ ions down their electrochemical gradient can drive the movement of other substances, such as glucose, into the cell against their concentration gradient - it is not just glucose which is transported in this way, this process is used to transport lots of different substances such as amino acids. In the case of glucose, the specific transporters are SGLT1 and SGLT2.
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