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    What is the best way to revise French a-level? I don't really know what i am doing and I feel like none of the material is sticking. Do you know any good resources for the different units?
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    (Original post by 22Vix22)
    What is the best way to revise French a-level? I don't really know what i am doing and I feel like none of the material is sticking. Do you know any good resources for the different units?
    How are you trying to revise?

    I got an A* in my French A-level mock and all I did was learn quotes from the film; you could try to improve your vocab and understanding by reading articles and watching videos, but there isn't much more you can do in my opinion.
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    (Original post by 22Vix22)
    What is the best way to revise French a-level? I don't really know what i am doing and I feel like none of the material is sticking. Do you know any good resources for the different units?
    I'm hoping I can be of help in regards to French as I am currently studying it at A-Level (I'm with AQA) and just really love the subject.

    Essentially there are 4 main sections of learning a language (Reading, listening, writing and speaking) with grammar as well! I will talk you through what I do for each section as it is probably the easiest thing!

    Reading: Okay, so for this I usually try to find/make a list of vocab that you need to know for your exams (most exam boards will have these on their websites/kerboodle if your school has it). This is the main way to get through a reading paper. Then I like to use Quizlet or Anki both of which you can get on your phone and online and keep practicing the vocab you have imported. If you're doing a specific qualification, someone has probably already uploaded vocab lists for you. If you can find any do past papers, mark it, and then highlight all the vocab you didn't know and any topics in particular you don't understand. I'm on the new A-Level specification so there are no past papers, so I like to read the news consistently in French, and print off specific articles linked to the spec and then do with them as I would with a past paper. Other than polishing your recognition of tenses and learning the vocab, there isn't really an easier way to get through the reading paper in my opinion.

    Listening: This is probably my favourite bit to revise. I like to listen to french radio (This article is excellent for recommending stations based on your learning goal! https://frenchtogether.com/french-radio/) but my personal favourites are Europe 1 and Skyrock. Additionally, I watch a lot of french films and TV shows either with english, french or no subtitles (La Mante and No Second Chance on Netflix are both awesome). I also use the websites TF1 and 6play to watch tv. (The Voice France is incredible and they've just finished broadcasting their 7th series. It's a great way to discover new music too. Le Meilleur Patissier is also really good, it's essentially Bake Off!) I find that anything that helps with listening also helps with the speaking aspect.

    Speaking: Pretty much the same as for listening but focus on being able to re-create the pronunciation and intonation of the speakers. Also, listening to French music and learning the lyrics to sing along can be a great confidence booster (Here are some useful playlists <https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...-eCPVnxXZ3L2o-> <https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...vq0uqSN1RRmFol>. I would recommend taking 5/10 minutes as often as you like to record yourself speaking, eg. describe what you did today, and listen back to it to hear your mistakes and improve.

    Writing: This is probably the easiest one to improve on but the hardest to practice. If you can find practice essay questions I'd do them, and hand them to a teacher to mark it. The writing aspect is very closely linked to grammar and the vocab part of the reading. Make sure you're confident on how to structure different tenses, and as a priority make sure you know etre, avoir, aller, devoir, pouvoir, faire, vouloir and savoir off by hear in as many tenses as possible (no really this will help a ton!) I also made a list of connectives/essay phrases to remember so that I can use them.

    Grammar: As I said above, learning really essential verb conjugations is a must. The only real way to improve grammar is by doing worksheets and exercises. There are so many grammar workbooks you can buy. There is also youtube for bits you really don't understand. Once you've mastered the grammar (not completely obviously, but just to a good standard) you'll find that everything else will become so much easier. Without grammar everything falls apart. On my phone I have an app called `Conjugaison` which just gives you verbs and tells you to put them in the correct tenses. It also shows you how to form each tense, and if you're doing homework you can search for verb conjugations.

    Sorry for the long answer but I hope this has given you some ideas to try out! Good luck xx
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    (Original post by Sonechka)
    How are you trying to revise?

    I got an A* in my French A-level mock and all I did was learn quotes from the film; you could try to improve your vocab and understanding by reading articles and watching videos, but there isn't much more you can do in my opinion.
    I am just making notes on the key things from each unit like facts and figures and then also the quotes from the movie. I also practise my vocab on quizlet and some other stuff. I know it is a very difficult subject to revise for and I probably just need to keep practising. Thank you.
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    (Original post by JeSuisBaguette)
    I'm hoping I can be of help in regards to French as I am currently studying it at A-Level (I'm with AQA) and just really love the subject.

    Essentially there are 4 main sections of learning a language (Reading, listening, writing and speaking) with grammar as well! I will talk you through what I do for each section as it is probably the easiest thing!

    Reading: Okay, so for this I usually try to find/make a list of vocab that you need to know for your exams (most exam boards will have these on their websites/kerboodle if your school has it). This is the main way to get through a reading paper. Then I like to use Quizlet or Anki both of which you can get on your phone and online and keep practicing the vocab you have imported. If you're doing a specific qualification, someone has probably already uploaded vocab lists for you. If you can find any do past papers, mark it, and then highlight all the vocab you didn't know and any topics in particular you don't understand. I'm on the new A-Level specification so there are no past papers, so I like to read the news consistently in French, and print off specific articles linked to the spec and then do with them as I would with a past paper. Other than polishing your recognition of tenses and learning the vocab, there isn't really an easier way to get through the reading paper in my opinion.

    Listening: This is probably my favourite bit to revise. I like to listen to french radio (This article is excellent for recommending stations based on your learning goal! https://frenchtogether.com/french-radio/) but my personal favourites are Europe 1 and Skyrock. Additionally, I watch a lot of french films and TV shows either with english, french or no subtitles (La Mante and No Second Chance on Netflix are both awesome). I also use the websites TF1 and 6play to watch tv. (The Voice France is incredible and they've just finished broadcasting their 7th series. It's a great way to discover new music too. Le Meilleur Patissier is also really good, it's essentially Bake Off!) I find that anything that helps with listening also helps with the speaking aspect.

    Speaking: Pretty much the same as for listening but focus on being able to re-create the pronunciation and intonation of the speakers. Also, listening to French music and learning the lyrics to sing along can be a great confidence booster (Here are some useful playlists <https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...-eCPVnxXZ3L2o-> <https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...vq0uqSN1RRmFol>. I would recommend taking 5/10 minutes as often as you like to record yourself speaking, eg. describe what you did today, and listen back to it to hear your mistakes and improve.

    Writing: This is probably the easiest one to improve on but the hardest to practice. If you can find practice essay questions I'd do them, and hand them to a teacher to mark it. The writing aspect is very closely linked to grammar and the vocab part of the reading. Make sure you're confident on how to structure different tenses, and as a priority make sure you know etre, avoir, aller, devoir, pouvoir, faire, vouloir and savoir off by hear in as many tenses as possible (no really this will help a ton!) I also made a list of connectives/essay phrases to remember so that I can use them.

    Grammar: As I said above, learning really essential verb conjugations is a must. The only real way to improve grammar is by doing worksheets and exercises. There are so many grammar workbooks you can buy. There is also youtube for bits you really don't understand. Once you've mastered the grammar (not completely obviously, but just to a good standard) you'll find that everything else will become so much easier. Without grammar everything falls apart. On my phone I have an app called `Conjugaison` which just gives you verbs and tells you to put them in the correct tenses. It also shows you how to form each tense, and if you're doing homework you can search for verb conjugations.

    Sorry for the long answer but I hope this has given you some ideas to try out! Good luck xx
    Thank you, this is going to help me so much!!!!!!
 
 
 
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