loooooooooool0
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If a strong acid is diluted by a factor of 100, does it mean it is diluted 10 or 100 times?
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whoremoan
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#2
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100 times
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loooooooooool0
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helppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppp
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whoremoan
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#4
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(Original post by loooooooooool0)
helppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppp
ffs I just answered your question fam
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loooooooooool0
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(Original post by *****moan)
100 times
does ph of 2.4 weak or strong acid
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whoremoan
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(Original post by loooooooooool0)
does ph of 2.4 weak or strong acid
strong, any acid with pH lower than 3 is considereed to be strong
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sstyan
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ah well the pH doesnt change by x100
but that is a strong acid
weak acids are considered 4-6
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loooooooooool0
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so the question was that this acid has pH of 2.4 and is diluted by a factor of 100, why is the new pH 3.4? shouldn't it be 4.4?
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loooooooooool0
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question was that this acid has pH of 2.4 and is diluted by a factor of 100, why is the new pH 3.4? shouldn't it be 4.4?
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Kian Stevens
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(Original post by loooooooooool0)
question was that this acid has pH of 2.4 and is diluted by a factor of 100, why is the new pH 3.4? shouldn't it be 4.4?
pH increases by 1 with each time the acid is diluted by a factor of 10. It's all logarithms, really.

For example, if I did -log(0.1) I'd get 1, if I did -log(0.01) I'd get 2, and so on... For each time the number decreases by a factor of 10, the logarithm increases by 1.
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charco
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(Original post by loooooooooool0)
question was that this acid has pH of 2.4 and is diluted by a factor of 100, why is the new pH 3.4? shouldn't it be 4.4?
Yes, you are correct.
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loooooooooool0
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(Original post by charco)
Yes, you are correct.
so because it is a weak acid, (0.5 x 2) makes it go up by 1 due to factor of 100?
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loooooooooool0
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pH of acid is 2.4
It is diluted by a factor of 100.
It's pH is now 3.4

Is it because it is a weak acid and as it gets diluted by a factor of 10, it goes up by 0.5 then again by 0.5 when diluted by another factor of 10?
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Baza2002
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You are correct
I know we've not met
But are you in top set?
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charco
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(Original post by loooooooooool0)
so because it is a weak acid, (0.5 x 2) makes it go up by 1 due to factor of 100?
Weak acid or strong acid - it makes no difference.

If you dilute by a factor of 100 the pH increases by 2 units.
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charco
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... and please stop making multiple threads on the same topic. I have to merge them, which is a pain in the ar**.
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loooooooooool0
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(Original post by charco)
Weak acid or strong acid - it makes no difference.

If you dilute by a factor of 100 the pH increases by 2 units.
i understand for strong acid, that it goes up by 2. But why weak acid? it would go up by 1 unit if diluted by a factor of 100 cus (0.5 x 2).
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Pigster
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(Original post by charco)
Weak acid or strong acid - it makes no difference.

If you dilute by a factor of 100 the pH increases by 2 units.
[H+] = SQRT(Ka x [HA])

Decreasing [HA] by a factor or 100x leads to a decrease in [H+] of 10x and hence an increase of pH of 1.

Or am I missing something?
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Bulletzone
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#19
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#19
(Original post by Pigster)
[H+] = SQRT(Ka x [HA])

Decreasing [HA] by a factor or 100x leads to a decrease in [H+] of 10x and hence an increase of pH of 1.

Or am I missing something?
No you're not Mr.Piggy
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charco
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(Original post by Pigster)
[H+] = SQRT(Ka x [HA])

Decreasing [HA] by a factor or 100x leads to a decrease in [H+] of 10x and hence an increase of pH of 1.

Or am I missing something?
I spoke hastily and incorrectly.

Initially the OP was asking about strong acids. Weak acids dilution factor needs to be rooted before logging.
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