A*my
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[Cu(OH)2(H2O)4]
but in excess NH3
[Cu(NH3)4(H2O)2]2+

Why would it substitute (OH)2 whereas excess substitute (NH3).
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Gghyhou
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I dont understand what you are asking. When added dropwise [Cu(h20)]2+ will hydrolise to [Cu(OH)2(H20)4] because NH3 is a base and so will accept protons from the metal complex. Copper can also undergo further subsitution, when excess NH3 is available, and this ONLY happens with copper. The OH- ions and H2O are displaced for NH3 ligands to form the [Cu(NH3)4(H2O)2]2+. You dont need to know why for the spec i think.
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Kian Stevens
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(Original post by A*my)
[Cu(OH)2(H2O)4]
but in excess NH3
[Cu(NH3)4(H2O)2]2+

Why would it substitute (OH)2 whereas excess substitute (NH3).
With small amounts (dropwise) of ammonia, it can act as a source of OH- ligands.

With excess ammonia, this is not the case and it will purely be a source of ammonia ligands.

Your question isn't very understandable, I'm afraid.
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