behann
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Does Le Chateliers principle apply to a closed system? I thought that for a reaction to remain in equilibrium, the system would have to be closed and therefore the reactants and products are not affected by outside influences but le chateliers principle occurs when there is a change to the system. So basically is it a closed system and why?
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ellridd
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(Original post by behann)
Does Le Chateliers principle apply to a closed system? I thought that for a reaction to remain in equilibrium, the system would have to be closed and therefore the reactants and products are not affected by outside influences but le chateliers principle occurs when there is a change to the system. So basically is it a closed system and why?
Le Chatelier's principle is not a system itself.
The system is still the closed equilibrium reaction but when external influences are introduced to the reaction, it is no longer in equilibrium SO it is no longer a closed reaction. Therefore Le Chatelier's principle takes place----aiming to restore the equilibrium and so reinstating the closed system.

I hope this makes sense and helps ,
Ell x
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djdubzzy
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(Original post by behann)
Does Le Chateliers principle apply to a closed system? I thought that for a reaction to remain in equilibrium, the system would have to be closed and therefore the reactants and products are not affected by outside influences but le chateliers principle occurs when there is a change to the system. So basically is it a closed system and why?
Le Chateliers principle only holds true in a closed system. In an open system you would never reach equilibrium as vapour of liquids and gases would escape. Once a closed system is at equilibrium, if a condition is changed e.g. increase temperature or pressure, according to le chatiliers principle the system would negate the change to return back to equilibrium.

For example, in a closed box where the forward reaction is exothermic, if you increase the temperature the equilibrium will shift to the left (favouring the backwards reaction) in order to reduce the temperature and bring the system back to an equilibrium state.
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