How many quotes to remember for english Lit Watch

mng
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#1
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I have english lit exam on thursday on hamlet, plus duchess of malfi comparison w chaucer
how many quotes are you guys doing for each text?
also starting to feel like i don't know the duchess of malfi at all lool
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mabelchiltern
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#2
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i'm also doing hamlet and what i've done is learn 4/5 key quotes from each character that have links to themes, e.g. laertes going 'my revenge will come' not only shows his recklessness but also hits on the theme of revenge and action in the play. for critics i've remembered extreme ones that are more memorable
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mng
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(Original post by mabelchiltern)
i'm also doing hamlet and what i've done is learn 4/5 key quotes from each character that have links to themes, e.g. laertes going 'my revenge will come' not only shows his recklessness but also hits on the theme of revenge and action in the play. for critics i've remembered extreme ones that are more memorable
how many critics quotes?
also what are you memorising for perfomance stuff?
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mabelchiltern
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i've got like 4/5 critics in my mind for hamlet characters that overlap with themes as well, e.g. hoye calling laertes 'a character fuelled by his emotions and susceptible to emotional rather than rational justification' goes well with action vs. inaction and contrasts with hamlet's more pensive and contemplative ways. for performance most of it i've found is common sense - 17th century productions were more violent, became more poignant in the 1700s (ophelia's role was sentimentalised and given to singers rather than actresses, all images of female sexuality in the mad scene were eliminated, etc). 1800s embraced female sexuality, esp french romantics. and modern ones tend to be more progressive - really focussing on how polonius restricts ophelia, sometimes ophelia's portrayed as sarcastic when she says things like 'i do not know... what i should think'. mostly i've been tracking how ophelia's been presented because not much else has changed. if you look at clips of robert icke's production with andrew scott as hamlet it gives a good insight as well, particularly the 'to be or not to be' bit
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mng
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(Original post by mabelchiltern)
i've got like 4/5 critics in my mind for hamlet characters that overlap with themes as well, e.g. hoye calling laertes 'a character fuelled by his emotions and susceptible to emotional rather than rational justification' goes well with action vs. inaction and contrasts with hamlet's more pensive and contemplative ways. for performance most of it i've found is common sense - 17th century productions were more violent, became more poignant in the 1700s (ophelia's role was sentimentalised and given to singers rather than actresses, all images of female sexuality in the mad scene were eliminated, etc). 1800s embraced female sexuality, esp french romantics. and modern ones tend to be more progressive - really focussing on how polonius restricts ophelia, sometimes ophelia's portrayed as sarcastic when she says things like 'i do not know... what i should think'. mostly i've been tracking how ophelia's been presented because not much else has changed. if you look at clips of robert icke's production with andrew scott as hamlet it gives a good insight as well, particularly the 'to be or not to be' bit
ahhh thank you so much!!!!!
you really know ur stuff
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mabelchiltern
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(Original post by mng)
ahhh thank you so much!!!!!
you really know ur stuff
i just hope the extract question is ok!!!
also, for the extract question - how are you learning what happens in each scene? some people can look at something like 'act 2 scene 4' and know exactly what's happened and what's about to come
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mng
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(Original post by mabelchiltern)
i just hope the extract question is ok!!!
also, for the extract question - how are you learning what happens in each scene? some people can look at something like 'act 2 scene 4' and know exactly what's happened and what's about to come
i mean its unlikely i'd be able to do that bc you just said act 2 scene 4 and have no idea what happens in that scene lool
but i reread the whole play and got key quotes from it as i went along so i thought that might help me to learn the structure of the play
im just hoping if i get a scene i will be able to remember vaguely what comes before and after it even if not exactly, from looking at the content of the scene
i guess if u really wanted to enforce ur knowledge u could make a quizlet and put the act and scene as the term and then put what happens in the scene as the definition? then test urself
idk if thats necessary tho lol at this point im jus kinda relying on luck
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