AQA A-Level Physics Paper 1: Discussion

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Unknownnnn
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Any questions of final queries for tomorrows exam?
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man111111
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(Original post by Unknownnnn)
Any questions of final queries for tomorrows exam?
http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/sample-p...1-QP-JUN17.PDF

do you mind explaining 3.3
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shobiiii
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are there any derivations we need to know
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Unknownnnn
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Ok, so the first thing to consider is that the higher the refractive index of a material, the more light will refract (bend) in it.

Due to that reason, you can think of this question as two separate sections almost. What happens to red light - it's going to be refracted as it's critical angle is going to be higher, due to the lower refractive index

And blue light is going to be Totally Internally Reflected as its critical angle is lower than that of green light and therefore is critical and is going to be smaller.

(Original post by man111111)
http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/sample-p...1-QP-JUN17.PDF

do you mind explaining 3.3
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Unknownnnn
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(Original post by shobiiii)
are there any derivations we need to know
I'm not fully sure im taking the exam myself tmrw
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Unknownnnn
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(Original post by shobiiii)
are there any derivations we need to know
Thing is with derivations, by equating to equations (that equal the same thing) you can work out any derivation really.
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man111111
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(Original post by Unknownnnn)
Ok, so the first thing to consider is that the higher the refractive index of a material, the more light will refract (bend) in it.

Due to that reason, you can think of this question as two separate sections almost. What happens to red light - it's going to be refracted as it's critical angle is going to be higher, due to the lower refractive index

And blue light is going to be Totally Internally Reflected as its critical angle is lower than that of green light and therefore is critical and is going to be smaller.
i thought refractive index is the speed of light in a substance so why would it be different for blue and red light
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Unknownnnn
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(Original post by man111111)
i thought refractive index is the speed of light in a substance so why would it be different for blue and red light
Probably due to the speed of light in the substance of each wavelength of light being different. That's why when you pass white light through a prism a rainbow appears. And in-fact exactly why rainbows exist.
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man111111
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(Original post by Unknownnnn)
Probably due to the speed of light in the substance of each wavelength of light being different. That's why when you pass white light through a prism a rainbow appears. And in-fact exactly why rainbows exist.
so is it safe for me to say that the longer the wavelength of a light the faster it will travel in the material and will refract less than a shorter wavelength

by the way i really appreciate your help
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