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Drinking Culture in the UK watch

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    Do you think the drinking attitudes of the British Isles countries need to become more in line with the rest of Europe???

    I think it would not be a bad thing at all. goodness knows its beeen a long time coming.

    the all-elusive 'cafe culture' would be infinitely preferable to our current drinking culture.

    However I don't know how this can be achieved - what do you think?
    do you think we need harsher puntive measures for drunks and troublemakers without spoiling the fun of responsible drinkers??
    or something else?

    do you even think its possible to change this kid of ingrained cultural attitude by legislation, within a generation?
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    Its not like all of Europe. Comparing with France, it is quite different. Drinking in Engalnd is about getting as drunk as possible, in its most general view. Binge drinking is becoming more common and its not a very safe way of drinking.

    French on the other hand drink more moderately, but again, binge drinking is cropping up and they are becoming more like the English. Cafe culture is becoming a thing of the past even though it is a much better alternative.

    Punishments won't stop the youth from consuming alcohol, they need to be educated on its ill effects and it should be made impossible for them to acquire alcohol until they are 18 and if they are caught they should be punished, how severly I don't know.

    Finally, I highly doubt the British attitude can be changed, although I hope it can be.
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    (Original post by Shrayans)
    Its not like all of Europe. Comparing with France, it is quite different. Drinking in Engalnd is about getting as drunk as possible, in its most general view. Binge drinking is becoming more common and its not a very safe way of drinking.

    French on the other hand drink more moderately, but again, binge drinking is cropping up and they are becoming more like the English. Cafe culture is becoming a thing of the past even though it is a much better alternative.

    Punishments won't stop the youth from consuming alcohol, they need to be educated on its ill effects and it should be made impossible for them to acquire alcohol until they are 18 and if they are caught they should be punished, how severly I don't know.

    Finally, I highly doubt the British attitude can be changed, although I hope it can be.
    a large proportion of the problem is not with 'youth' as such. In any town or city centres on a weekend night a lot of the people you see shouting and fighting and intimidating are 25+

    you in fact, relatively often in fact, see men on the cusp of middle age who probably have a nice wife and kids and help out at their kids junior football club during the week, acting like completely obnoxious morons when drunk in the high street of a weekend.

    I know youth are responsible for a large proportion of the bad behaviour and it is perhaps most important to educate those who are,afterall, the future, but the problem is certainly not exclusive to the youngest of drinkers. its a cultural thing not a generational thing, I think a certain attitude to drinking is ingrained within the British psyche (not with everyone obviously but many)
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    Perhaps, but that is the impression I have had so far, one which will be corrected when I get to the UK
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    I wonder if alcohol will ever go the way of smoking i.e. less and less people are smokers these days, cigs are becoming more expensive and smokings banned in public places which will inevitably lead to less people smoking. I can't see alcohol being banned completely, at least not in our life time though.
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    (Original post by Shrayans)
    Perhaps, but that is the impression I have had so far, one which will be corrected when I get to the UK
    For ****'s sake. :rolleyes:
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    I have quite the opposite feelings, normalise alcohol - start selling it everywhere, remove public drinking regulations, allow children over 16 into pubs to drink non-spirits, open pubs and clubs til dawn.

    It'll be carnage for a while, I should imagine. But it will die down eventually.
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    (Original post by britishseapower)
    I wonder if alcohol will ever go the way of smoking i.e. less and less people are smokers these days, cigs are becoming more expensive and smokings banned in public places which will inevitably lead to less people smoking. I can't see alcohol being banned completely, at least not in our life time though.
    Alcohol is becoming increasingly expensive, and is becoming even more likely to be banned 'in public' (ie, on the street, in parks etc) than before.
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    (Original post by L i b)
    I have quite the opposite feelings, normalise alcohol - start selling it everywhere, remove public drinking regulations, allow children over 16 into pubs to drink non-spirits, open pubs and clubs til dawn.

    It'll be carnage for a while, I should imagine. But it will die down eventually.
    i would be in favour of that if it was accompanied by much much harsher fines for unacceptable drunken behaviour and drunken assaults

    as I understand thats pretty much the situation in Germany where it seems to work
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    (Original post by mark renton)
    the all-elusive 'cafe culture' would be infinitely preferable to our current drinking culture.
    Would be not a bad thing. I always thing there's huge business opportunity going missing as all the cafes seem to close at 5 or 6 and don't seem t o be up for more profits they could make by opening late-I'm sure lots of people would like a place to meet friends late that doesn t necessarily involve alcohol...could catch on.
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    Its unfair to point the finger at youth. Most of the people i know and myself are responsible drinkers. The best idea imo would be to let 16's and older drink beer etc. and spirits when you turn 18 that way you can gradually ease in drinking into your life
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    I think it's every man's right to do a depressing and pointless job, and then go out at the weekend get drunk, try and pull some blokes gf or whatever and then get into a fight and be arrested, and spend Saturday morning in Jail. It's what made this country great you know.
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    (Original post by Sidhe)
    It's what made this country great you know.
    Surely it was illiberal liberals who did that?
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    The more you try and legislate and 'punish' drinking, making it a taboo the bigger a problem it becomes. For underage drinkers it can be seen as a way of rebelling. I agree with Lib and rizzletastic. Or like in Spain/Portual/France/italy where children are given wine with a family meal, it encourages responsible, relaxed drinking. Not down as much as you can as fast as you can.

    My parents bought me alcohol before i was 18 to drink at home on special meals etc or if i had a couple of friends round..that way could keep under control. Made drinking less of a 'big deal' for me. (Although can we all honestly say we've never been on a huge bender?!) Some of us just know how to behave in society..maybe thats the problem. Legislation wont fix that either, its taken generations for this mindset to arise, it wont just disappear overnight because a piece of paper dictates it should.
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    As everyone has already stated, forbidding it makes it even more tempting.

    My parents completely forbade me from drinking when I was 15-16. I went out and got hideously, worryingly drunk on a regular basis. It was more a rebellion than anything else.

    Now, I'm bored of that. I will have a couple of drinks when I am out - just enough to get slightly tipsy - and stop there. Mostly, I just stick to a glass of wine or champagne. I'm bored of whole 'oh my god, what did I do last night?!' thing

    Plus, my parents are pretty relaxed about alcohol now. They know I drink a bit, I have wine with meals, but it usually stops there. I just don't see the attraction any more.
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    (Original post by mark renton)
    i would be in favour of that if it was accompanied by much much harsher fines for unacceptable drunken behaviour and drunken assaults
    Oh yes, definitely. Assault and other violent crimes should be taken enormously more seriously than they are today.
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    it really down to the individuel but i have lost alot of respect for individuels over alcohol abuse. my girlfriend has a problem and my mum has been an alcoholic in the past, yet i work in a bar and manage to control myself.

    it is something i could live without.
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    (Original post by Sianeh)
    The more you try and legislate and 'punish' drinking, making it a taboo the bigger a problem it becomes. For underage drinkers it can be seen as a way of rebelling. I agree with Lib and rizzletastic. Or like in Spain/Portual/France/italy where children are given wine with a family meal, it encourages responsible, relaxed drinking. Not down as much as you can as fast as you can.

    My parents bought me alcohol before i was 18 to drink at home on special meals etc or if i had a couple of friends round..that way could keep under control. Made drinking less of a 'big deal' for me. (Although can we all honestly say we've never been on a huge bender?!) Some of us just know how to behave in society..maybe thats the problem. Legislation wont fix that either, its taken generations for this mindset to arise, it wont just disappear overnight because a piece of paper dictates it should.
    Meh, my parents did that too... I'd say I have a more controlled attitude to drinking now and dont need to get wasted everytime i go out but when I was 16/17/18, basically before I was at uni, I drank to get drunk everytime I went out... so their method wasn't particularly effective.
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    I, for my part, think that it has something to do with the unavailability of alcohol at a young age (please read the rest of the post before flaming).

    If people have always had no access to alcohol, and view it as a "naughty" thing, when they are looking for something to use to rebel, that is what they turn to (see also, smoking to look "cool").

    In Europe, alcohol is rarely "forbidden" to minors, e.g. in France, home of (fairly) fine wine, most people have a glass/bottle of wine with a meal, children included.

    I, for my part, have never actually been denied access to alcohol, I have always had the option of having a glass of wine/beer with a meal (I even took part in a wine tasting session when I was about 10), and I have never felt the need to drink for the sake of drinking.

    Now, I'm not saying "sell alcohol to minors", because that is just daft, but I do think that there are better ways of moderating it than are in place at the moment.
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    (Original post by L i b)
    I have quite the opposite feelings, normalise alcohol - start selling it everywhere, remove public drinking regulations, allow children over 16 into pubs to drink non-spirits, open pubs and clubs til dawn.

    It'll be carnage for a while, I should imagine. But it will die down eventually.
    Didn't exactly work with 24-hour drinking? No?
 
 
 
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