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Revise AQA sociology paper 1 exam with me??? watch

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    im just going to start revising on here and please join in.
    im going to outline how to answer each question first as part of my revison and then I'll ask a question and the next person has to asnwer it (it could be any marks) . if nobody answers ill just respond to myself.

    1) 4 marks - give two brief reasons with a simple explanation. do not spend more than 5 mins on this or your wasting time.
    2) 6 marks - 3 reasons with a simple but detailed explanation for each reason.
    3) 10 mark - 2 points in 2 paragraphs. the answer will be in the time. pick out two reasons from the time. this is called application from the item. analyse it by including studies or explanations.
    4) 30 mark - atleast 6 to 7 paragraphs. you should have for and against paragraphs. develop a chain of reasoning. make sure to evaluate in each para by finding strengths critcism and alternatives to the study. application from the item is crucial
    5) 20 mark - use material from the item. 6 paragraphs including intro, 3 or 4 points, and a conclusion. dont just explore the research method but explore it in terms of the contect.
    6) 10 mark - two developed reasons in two paras


    If you guys would like to add anything to this or point out any mistakes ive made, do let me know. any revision would b good rn.

    okay first question:
    outline and explain two ways in which material deprivation can impact on educational achievement. (10 mark)
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    outline and explain two ways in which material deprivation can impact educational acheidvement? (10m)

    Planned answer:

    • Cramped homes and lack of space means no room for children to play and physically develop which will result in having impaired development at school and cause child to fall behind. it could also mean there is no space to study and do homework other than in cramped environments where the child can't concentrate causing them to fall behind due to performing poorly on tests and not completing homework to the best of their ability
    • sharing rooms means poor sleep and poor concentration at school
    • constantly moving homes mean child will constantly move schools meaning they are unable to keep up with school curriculum so will fall behind other students.
    • Poorer parents cant afford to buy nutritional food for their children causing them to have more illnesses and weakness which will affect their health at school: poor concetnration absences at school


    outline and explain two reasons for gender differences in subject choice (10 mark)
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    outline and explain two reasons for gender differences in subject choice (10 mark)

    • Peer Pressure - students may feel pressured by their friends to take heavily gendered subjects or risk being labelled "boffin" etc.
    • Gendered subject images - Science text books often have pictures of males instead of females which may be offputting to female students. Furthermore they are more likely to have female teachers for humanities and male teachers for sciences which can also sway students.
    • The way the subject is taught - boys can be more hands on in science subjects and may dominate the laboraroty which can be discouraging for female studetns

    any other reasons?
    i feel like i need to go over this now
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    Outline why girls achieve more than boys in eduaction (10 marks)

    - Changes within the family.
    - Increased number of female-headed lone-parent families.
    - More women need to take on the breadwinner role.
    - Creates a role model for young girls - the financially independent women.
    - To achieve this, girls need well paid jobs and therefore good qualifications.

    - The impact of feminism.
    - Feminists strive for equality between the sexes.
    - Since the 1960s, feminists have challenged the traditional stereotype of a women's role as a housewife who is inferior to the husband.
    - This had improved women's rights and opportunities and raised women's expectations.
    - Therefore, more girls strive to achieve in education.



    Outline three reasons why schools have become increasingly privatised in recent years (6 marks)
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    I have a feeling that privatisation will come up as it hasn't come up in the past. Can anyone explain to me what Academies are... Thank you.
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    (Original post by nbhjbmnjn)
    Outline why girls achieve more than boys in eduaction (10 marks)

    - Changes within the family.
    - Increased number of female-headed lone-parent families.
    - More women need to take on the breadwinner role.
    - Creates a role model for young girls - the financially independent women.
    - To achieve this, girls need well paid jobs and therefore good qualifications.

    - The impact of feminism.
    - Feminists strive for equality between the sexes.
    - Since the 1960s, feminists have challenged the traditional stereotype of a women's role as a housewife who is inferior to the husband.
    - This had improved women's rights and opportunities and raised women's expectations.
    - Therefore, more girls strive to achieve in education.



    Outline three reasons why schools have become increasingly privatised in recent years (6 marks)

    wow thats a hard six mark question lol

    • Schools have become privatised due to the influence of new right ideas about education which includes less state involvement in the education system and allowing schools more independence to decide the needs of their students
    • to raise educational acheievemnt and encourage high standards amog schools by making them compete with eachother so they have to fight to be on top of league tables and improve teaching methods and resources to help students.
    • To give parents greater choice over their children's education called parentocracy. This could include free schools or schools in general who are answerable to parents and giving them greater choice and control over their childrens education.
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    (Original post by Naledixx)
    I have a feeling that privatisation will come up as it hasn't come up in the past. Can anyone explain to me what Academies are... Thank you.
    in 2010 the coalition government encouraged all schools to convert to academies which would be fuNded by private businesses and had to compete with other schools in order to get more students and more funding.

    Read Item B below and answer the question that follows.
    Item B Sociologists agree that education transmits ideas and values. However, they disagree about the nature of these ideas and values, and who benefits from this process. For example, feminists argue that education transmits patriarchal ideology, and that this benefits men. Other sociologists argue that the education system has become fragmented and transmits a diverse range of ideas and values.

    Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate sociological explanations of the role of education in transmitting ideas and values. [30 marks]
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    (Original post by justanotherchica)
    wow thats a hard six mark question lol

    • Schools have become privatised due to the influence of new right ideas about education which includes less state involvement in the education system and allowing schools more independence to decide the needs of their students
    • to raise educational acheievemnt and encourage high standards amog schools by making them compete with eachother so they have to fight to be on top of league tables and improve teaching methods and resources to help students.
    • To give parents greater choice over their children's education called parentocracy. This could include free schools or schools in general who are answerable to parents and giving them greater choice and control over their childrens education.
    I know lol but it's predicted to be on the exam tomorrow
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    (Original post by nbhjbmnjn)
    I know lol but it's predicted to be on the exam tomorrow
    what other predictions are there for tomorrow?
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    (Original post by justanotherchica)
    in 2010 the coalition government encouraged all schools to convert to academies which would be fuNded by private businesses and had to compete with other schools in order to get more students and more funding.

    Read Item B below and answer the question that follows.
    Item B Sociologists agree that education transmits ideas and values. However, they disagree about the nature of these ideas and values, and who benefits from this process. For example, feminists argue that education transmits patriarchal ideology, and that this benefits men. Other sociologists argue that the education system has become fragmented and transmits a diverse range of ideas and values.

    Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate sociological explanations of the role of education in transmitting ideas and values. [30 marks]
    can someone answer this because im finding it quite difficult
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    (Original post by justanotherchica)
    what other predictions are there for tomorrow?
    The only predictions I have heard (from teachers and online) have been about policies. Apparently there's going to be a 6 marker on education and globalisation, and the 30 marker is on the privatisation of education!
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    Is the privatisation of education basically things such as marketisation, parental choice, formula funding etc???

    (Original post by justanotherchica)
    wow thats a hard six mark question lol

    • Schools have become privatised due to the influence of new right ideas about education which includes less state involvement in the education system and allowing schools more independence to decide the needs of their students
    • to raise educational acheievemnt and encourage high standards amog schools by making them compete with eachother so they have to fight to be on top of league tables and improve teaching methods and resources to help students.
    • To give parents greater choice over their children's education called parentocracy. This could include free schools or schools in general who are answerable to parents and giving them greater choice and control over their childrens education.
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    (Original post by nbhjbmnjn)
    Is the privatisation of education basically things such as marketisation, parental choice, formula funding etc???
    privatisation of education means that schools operate as businesses. private businesses choose to invest and run schools that they believe can be successful. the schools they choose will have ample funding wheras the schools that aren't chosen will be dependent on local authorities and have less funding.

    it includes cola-isation and globalisation as businesses abroad such as pearson have influence over our examinations and companies such as cola can make money through schools. schools have become a giant money making institution. infact they are highly profitable to companies because young people are so impressionable that anything teachers recommend will influence their choicees.

    Marketisation is a part of privatisation and yes it includes raising competitio between schools to create high standards; it includes parentocracy; formula funding; league tables and cream skimming and silt shifting.

    privatisation and marketisation according to public policy research (2012) creates competition orientated education which increases segregation of the classes and reproduces inequalities.
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    (Original post by justanotherchica)
    privatisation of education means that schools operate as businesses. private businesses choose to invest and run schools that they believe can be successful. the schools they choose will have ample funding wheras the schools that aren't chosen will be dependent on local authorities and have less funding.

    it includes cola-isation and globalisation as businesses abroad such as pearson have influence over our examinations and companies such as cola can make money through schools. schools have become a giant money making institution. infact they are highly profitable to companies because young people are so impressionable that anything teachers recommend will influence their choicees.

    Marketisation is a part of privatisation and yes it includes raising competitio between schools to create high standards; it includes parentocracy; formula funding; league tables and cream skimming and silt shifting.

    privatisation and marketisation according to public policy research (2012) creates competition orientated education which increases segregation of the classes and reproduces inequalities.

    Ok thank you so much! I've hardly revised policies since i've been spending so much time on educational differences and perspectives
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    (Original post by justanotherchica)
    can someone answer this because im finding it quite difficult
    Look at revise sociology website, they have a model answer that got 28/30
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    (Original post by justanotherchica)
    in 2010 the coalition government encouraged all schools to convert to academies which would be fuNded by private businesses and had to compete with other schools in order to get more students and more funding.

    Read Item B below and answer the question that follows.
    Item B Sociologists agree that education transmits ideas and values. However, they disagree about the nature of these ideas and values, and who benefits from this process. For example, feminists argue that education transmits patriarchal ideology, and that this benefits men. Other sociologists argue that the education system has become fragmented and transmits a diverse range of ideas and values.

    Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate sociological explanations of the role of education in transmitting ideas and values. [30 marks]

    okay so i got confused when i saw values ad started thinking about theories and methods in the second book but ik how to answer it...
    i think

    1. functionalism durkheim, social solidarity, parson meritocracy. evaluation - marxists myth of meritocracy, imposes values of upper class
    2. Marxist perspective - althusser ideological state apparatus, bowles and gintis correspondence principle and schooling america evaluation - paul willis the lads and diversity of inequality such racial and gender discrimination which marxism ignores.

    idk what else can you guys add to this
    i suppose i could make 3 or 4 paragraphs out of those two points.
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    (Original post by justanotherchica)
    in 2010 the coalition government encouraged all schools to convert to academies which would be fuNded by private businesses and had to compete with other schools in order to get more students and more funding.

    Read Item B below and answer the question that follows.
    Item B Sociologists agree that education transmits ideas and values. However, they disagree about the nature of these ideas and values, and who benefits from this process. For example, feminists argue that education transmits patriarchal ideology, and that this benefits men. Other sociologists argue that the education system has become fragmented and transmits a diverse range of ideas and values.

    Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate sociological explanations of the role of education in transmitting ideas and values. [30 marks]

    Item B states that education plays a role in socialisation. Feminists argue that education reinforces hegemonic masculinity. However, other sociologists such as Functionalists argue that education transmits shared values and post-modernists for example argue that education is diverse and transmits a range of values.
    Feminists suggest that education transmits patriarchal ideology. Radical Feminists would say that male teachers/ pupils behave in ways that reinforce hegemonic masculinity. For example, male teachers tell boys off for ‘behaving like girls’ and they also ‘rescue’ female teachers when they are disciplining students. Radical feminists say that this makes females feel inferior to males and therefor means that the role of education is to reinforce the idea that males are the dominant gender. However, a specific evaluation is that the male teachers may rescue female teachers because they are in a more authoritative position. Additionally, post-modernists would disagree with feminists and argue that education is no longer based on inequality, but based on diversity.
    Functionalists suggest that education transmits shared values. Durkheim argues that the role of education is to create social solidarity and value consensus. He argues that education achieves this via assemblies, teaching a common history (giving a sense of national identity and bring people together) and teaching core values such as respect which bring social order. Parsons agrees and argues that education is the focal socialising agency and ‘Parsons bridge implies that education takes people from particularistic values of the family/ home to universalistic values of the work place. The New right agree with functionalists that the role of education is to transmit shared values. However, Marxists disagree with functionalists and argue that the socialisation aspect of the role of education is not to create value consensus but that education is uses as an ideological state apparatus, to transmit ruling class ideology.
    Marxists suggest that the role of education is to ‘brainwash’ the working class. Althusser argues that education is an ideological state apparatus that transmits ruling class ideology in order to legitimse the inequality caused by the capitalist class. Bowles and Gintis argue that there is a ‘hidden curriculum’ that socialises the working class into obedient workers in order to benefit capitalism. For example, they are taught that being punished for minor issues is acceptable and the importance of punctuality and that they have to obey the people above them in the social hierarchy – e.g. teachers then boss. However, a specific problem of the hidden curriculum is that a study by Willis showed that students can see through the role of education and reject the hidden curriculum.
    Bowles and Gintis also argued that there is a correspondence principle where school mirrors work. Similarities such as extrinsic satisfaction (only doing something for rewards, not because you enjoy it eg school to get GCSEs, work to get money) socialise working class pupils to not expect a rewarding job when they leave school and this benefits the capitalist class. As a result, Marxists argue that the role of education is to transmit ruling class ideology and benefit the bourgeoisie. However, functionalists and new right disagree and argue that values are shared to create a value consensus. They argue that marxism is wrong for basing it on conflict when it is really consensus.
    Functionasts such as Parsons suggest that education is meritocratic. This means that pupils are taught that they need to work hard if they want to achieve. He argues that the education system is based on this which suggests people only fail if they do not try hard enough. However, Marxists such as Bordieu argue that education promotes middle class values which means working class students fail because their values are not wanted by the school – not because of meritocracy. Ball argued that meritocracy is a myth. However, new right agree and argue that it is down to the individual to work hard and achieve.
    Perhaps the main strength of explaining the role of education in transmitting ideas/ values is the functionalist view that education is used to create shared values, because it can be applied to real life education because schools do have assemblies and promote core values. Perhaps the main weakness is the postmodern view because although education is more diverse, each school still has an ETHOS that has been developed by middle class individuals.
    Post modernists argue that marxists, feminists and functionalists are out of date. Liberal feminists would argue that the role of education is no longer to reinforce hegemonic masculinity but that inequality/ patriarchy is improving.
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    (Original post by stormtropper)
    Item B states that education plays a role in socialisation. Feminists argue that education reinforces hegemonic masculinity. However, other sociologists such as Functionalists argue that education transmits shared values and post-modernists for example argue that education is diverse and transmits a range of values.
    Feminists suggest that education transmits patriarchal ideology. Radical Feminists would say that male teachers/ pupils behave in ways that reinforce hegemonic masculinity. For example, male teachers tell boys off for ‘behaving like girls’ and they also ‘rescue’ female teachers when they are disciplining students. Radical feminists say that this makes females feel inferior to males and therefor means that the role of education is to reinforce the idea that males are the dominant gender. However, a specific evaluation is that the male teachers may rescue female teachers because they are in a more authoritative position. Additionally, post-modernists would disagree with feminists and argue that education is no longer based on inequality, but based on diversity.
    Functionalists suggest that education transmits shared values. Durkheim argues that the role of education is to create social solidarity and value consensus. He argues that education achieves this via assemblies, teaching a common history (giving a sense of national identity and bring people together) and teaching core values such as respect which bring social order. Parsons agrees and argues that education is the focal socialising agency and ‘Parsons bridge implies that education takes people from particularistic values of the family/ home to universalistic values of the work place. The New right agree with functionalists that the role of education is to transmit shared values. However, Marxists disagree with functionalists and argue that the socialisation aspect of the role of education is not to create value consensus but that education is uses as an ideological state apparatus, to transmit ruling class ideology.
    Marxists suggest that the role of education is to ‘brainwash’ the working class. Althusser argues that education is an ideological state apparatus that transmits ruling class ideology in order to legitimse the inequality caused by the capitalist class. Bowles and Gintis argue that there is a ‘hidden curriculum’ that socialises the working class into obedient workers in order to benefit capitalism. For example, they are taught that being punished for minor issues is acceptable and the importance of punctuality and that they have to obey the people above them in the social hierarchy – e.g. teachers then boss. However, a specific problem of the hidden curriculum is that a study by Willis showed that students can see through the role of education and reject the hidden curriculum.
    Bowles and Gintis also argued that there is a correspondence principle where school mirrors work. Similarities such as extrinsic satisfaction (only doing something for rewards, not because you enjoy it eg school to get GCSEs, work to get money) socialise working class pupils to not expect a rewarding job when they leave school and this benefits the capitalist class. As a result, Marxists argue that the role of education is to transmit ruling class ideology and benefit the bourgeoisie. However, functionalists and new right disagree and argue that values are shared to create a value consensus. They argue that marxism is wrong for basing it on conflict when it is really consensus.
    Functionasts such as Parsons suggest that education is meritocratic. This means that pupils are taught that they need to work hard if they want to achieve. He argues that the education system is based on this which suggests people only fail if they do not try hard enough. However, Marxists such as Bordieu argue that education promotes middle class values which means working class students fail because their values are not wanted by the school – not because of meritocracy. Ball argued that meritocracy is a myth. However, new right agree and argue that it is down to the individual to work hard and achieve.
    Perhaps the main strength of explaining the role of education in transmitting ideas/ values is the functionalist view that education is used to create shared values, because it can be applied to real life education because schools do have assemblies and promote core values. Perhaps the main weakness is the postmodern view because although education is more diverse, each school still has an ETHOS that has been developed by middle class individuals.
    Post modernists argue that marxists, feminists and functionalists are out of date. Liberal feminists would argue that the role of education is no longer to reinforce hegemonic masculinity but that inequality/ patriarchy is improving.
    **** i really love you rn <3
    hope you ace your exams!!!
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    (Original post by stormtropper)
    Item B states that education plays a role in socialisation. Feminists argue that education reinforces hegemonic masculinity. However, other sociologists such as Functionalists argue that education transmits shared values and post-modernists for example argue that education is diverse and transmits a range of values.
    Feminists suggest that education transmits patriarchal ideology. Radical Feminists would say that male teachers/ pupils behave in ways that reinforce hegemonic masculinity. For example, male teachers tell boys off for ‘behaving like girls’ and they also ‘rescue’ female teachers when they are disciplining students. Radical feminists say that this makes females feel inferior to males and therefor means that the role of education is to reinforce the idea that males are the dominant gender. However, a specific evaluation is that the male teachers may rescue female teachers because they are in a more authoritative position. Additionally, post-modernists would disagree with feminists and argue that education is no longer based on inequality, but based on diversity.
    Functionalists suggest that education transmits shared values. Durkheim argues that the role of education is to create social solidarity and value consensus. He argues that education achieves this via assemblies, teaching a common history (giving a sense of national identity and bring people together) and teaching core values such as respect which bring social order. Parsons agrees and argues that education is the focal socialising agency and ‘Parsons bridge implies that education takes people from particularistic values of the family/ home to universalistic values of the work place. The New right agree with functionalists that the role of education is to transmit shared values. However, Marxists disagree with functionalists and argue that the socialisation aspect of the role of education is not to create value consensus but that education is uses as an ideological state apparatus, to transmit ruling class ideology.
    Marxists suggest that the role of education is to ‘brainwash’ the working class. Althusser argues that education is an ideological state apparatus that transmits ruling class ideology in order to legitimse the inequality caused by the capitalist class. Bowles and Gintis argue that there is a ‘hidden curriculum’ that socialises the working class into obedient workers in order to benefit capitalism. For example, they are taught that being punished for minor issues is acceptable and the importance of punctuality and that they have to obey the people above them in the social hierarchy – e.g. teachers then boss. However, a specific problem of the hidden curriculum is that a study by Willis showed that students can see through the role of education and reject the hidden curriculum.
    Bowles and Gintis also argued that there is a correspondence principle where school mirrors work. Similarities such as extrinsic satisfaction (only doing something for rewards, not because you enjoy it eg school to get GCSEs, work to get money) socialise working class pupils to not expect a rewarding job when they leave school and this benefits the capitalist class. As a result, Marxists argue that the role of education is to transmit ruling class ideology and benefit the bourgeoisie. However, functionalists and new right disagree and argue that values are shared to create a value consensus. They argue that marxism is wrong for basing it on conflict when it is really consensus.
    Functionasts such as Parsons suggest that education is meritocratic. This means that pupils are taught that they need to work hard if they want to achieve. He argues that the education system is based on this which suggests people only fail if they do not try hard enough. However, Marxists such as Bordieu argue that education promotes middle class values which means working class students fail because their values are not wanted by the school – not because of meritocracy. Ball argued that meritocracy is a myth. However, new right agree and argue that it is down to the individual to work hard and achieve.
    Perhaps the main strength of explaining the role of education in transmitting ideas/ values is the functionalist view that education is used to create shared values, because it can be applied to real life education because schools do have assemblies and promote core values. Perhaps the main weakness is the postmodern view because although education is more diverse, each school still has an ETHOS that has been developed by middle class individuals.
    Post modernists argue that marxists, feminists and functionalists are out of date. Liberal feminists would argue that the role of education is no longer to reinforce hegemonic masculinity but that inequality/ patriarchy is improving.
    ahh i love you rn <3
    hope you ****ing ace uour examss!!!!
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    (Original post by stormtropper)
    Look at revise sociology website, they have a model answer that got 28/30
    Do you have the link for it?
 
 
 
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