Geographic academic requirements

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agm1
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Hi,
When searching for jobs online I notice that a particular job in one city requires academic qualifications, when the same job in another city does not.

For example. 9 times of out 10, an advertised Business Analyst role located in Cambridge requires a degree. However, when looking at a Business Analyst role in, say, Leeds a degree is only required 3 times out of 10. Why is this?

So it's the same type of role but in very different cities and for different companies.
If a requirement of a degree is used to filter down the applicants then surely the academic requirement would be requested at all locations.
Is it because Cambridge is a university city and therefore the companies located there feel they need to promote education by restricting opportunities on degrees?
Is it because the type of companies based in Cambridge are those run by academic minded people (i.e. they go to Cambridge uni and stay in Cambridge once they complete their degree, and then start employment in Cambridge, and go on to interview others in Cambridge)?
Dare I say it, but is there a north/south divide on this? Maybe in the south applicants are expected to have a degree whereas in the north it isn't so important or common.

Has anyone else found this too? What are your thoughts to why this is?

Thanks (hope I haven't upset anyone with the north/south divide comment - it's not a belief of mine).
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by agm1)
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It's complicated! First of all, very few job titles are protected, in other words you can use the title Business Analyst, Executive, Manager etc and really mean anything you like. There are very individual company and sector conventions on this which don't read across to other companies or sectors.

Second, job descriptions can read in similar ways, especially if the recruiting manager hasn't bothered to tailor much, but what they actually want and what their actual priorities are can vary greatly. (That's why, if a contact number is given, you should always ring and ask what their top 3 priorities are).

Third, jobs where you are selling your staff's intellect and skill quite directly to a business, eg business analyst, more or less anything with consultant in it etc then generally you need to match or exceed the academic standard of your clients. So companies that deliver to academically selective companies, need to be academically selective in the business analysts, consultants etc they pitch to give advice. Conversely, companies in less competitive sectors or sectors where practical experience is rated (agriculture, manufacturing etc) will be less bothered by degrees and more bothered by experience.

Fourth, many employers simply put degree is as a filter, because that still leaves a significant pool of recruits. Apply anyway, it's rarely a real filter.

Fifth, Cambridge (and the other place) are outliers, and yes employers probably require degrees more than many/most other areas, but that is primarily because of points 3 and 4 combined.
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agm1
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threeportdrift - thank you for your reply.

It was really useful to have your input on the matter. It just puzzles me why different areas have differing levels of restrictions on their advertised positions. It's a little bit clearer now.
Also, in this day of equality, is it not discriminate to advertised roles for restricting non graduates?! Just a thought.
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by agm1)
threeportdrift - thank you for your reply.

It was really useful to have your input on the matter. It just puzzles me why different areas have differing levels of restrictions on their advertised positions. It's a little bit clearer now.
Also, in this day of equality, is it not discriminate to advertised roles for restricting non graduates?! Just a thought.
Legal discrimination (as opposed to the technical definition of just differentiating between different things) can only be claimed in the case of certain specified characteristics. Educational attainment isn't one of those protected characteristics.
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