Moving to the US after GCSEs Watch

graay
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I’m currently at the end of year 10 and will do my GCSE’s next year this time. My family was planning on moving to the US after I’ve finished my GCSE’s, so around late summer / early autumn in 2019.
I’m wondering if I’m going to be able to get credit for the GCSEs I’ve done and I’ve also read that if I’d pass all my GCSE’s I’d be able to qualify for a US HS Diploma. Is this true or will I have to do get as many credits as possible to graduate high school from the start? If this is the case, i don’t think it’d be a good idea to move to the US just to take the SATs in spring 2020 and have to catch up with all the subjects e.t.c

I also wondered if it was a good idea to move in the middle of my A Levels and start in Senior Year, or would this a bad time to move there?

I’d rather live in the US than UK for personal reasons and would want to live in the US when I’m older, so having graduating from high school in US would make it easier for me to get into college / university in the US and later on start working there!
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Sheperd23
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I want to live in the US....

so big and free in a way
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random_matt
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From one **** hole to another.
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Sheperd23
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(Original post by random_matt)
From one **** hole to another.
How? Both aren't.
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random_matt
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(Original post by Kangaroo17)
How? Both aren't.
There not? We all have preferences, I'll leave it at that.
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Sheperd23
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(Original post by random_matt)
There not? We all have preferences, I'll leave it at that.
Fine, but you live in the UK right?
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random_matt
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(Original post by Kangaroo17)
Fine, but you live in the UK right?
Yeah mate, I'll move one day, I hope anyway.
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Sheperd23
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(Original post by random_matt)
Yeah mate, I'll move one day, I hope anyway.
Where to? And why?
if you do mind me asking.
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Kian Stevens
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*sigh*

So many young, easily influenced teenagers see America as a country full of big, lush states which are crammed full of showbiz and superstars. They dream of nothing more than to live somewhere like New York, California or Florida, simply because their favourite celebrity lives there and it allegedly looks like the best place to live, 'ever'. These 'personal reasons' are merely that they want to escape to a country which emanates false perceptions of itself.

In reality, only a few places in America really fit the naive criteria these teenagers have. The rest are just your standard. every day cities, like here in the UK - nothing more, nothing less. Not to mention, with the questionable government America currently has, the trigger happy police force and the high crime rates over there compared to the UK, I see no reason why I'd want to move to America; it's big, vast and full of arrogant, egoistical people. That may be a gross generalisation, but our friends across the pond bring it on themselves.

I'd much rather live in my little city called Sheffield, a city where the typical, superficial Americans trying to live 'the dream' would never dream of moving to, and be proud of it - it's my Sheffield I was born and bred in. Not some state over in America trying to big itself up and ultimately failing at doing so.

Rant over.
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random_matt
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(Original post by Kangaroo17)
Where to? And why?
if you do mind me asking.
Norway, want to be surrounded by trees, forest etc. High standard of living too.
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AlwaysBroke.
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(Original post by Kian Stevens)
*sigh*

So many young, easily influenced teenagers see America as a country full of big, lush states which are crammed full of showbiz and superstars. They dream of nothing more than to live somewhere like New York, California or Florida, simply because their favourite celebrity lives there and it allegedly looks like the best place to live, 'ever'. These 'personal reasons' are merely that they want to escape to a country which emanates false perceptions of itself.

In reality, only a few places in America really fit the naive criteria these teenagers have. The rest are just your standard. every day cities, like here in the UK - nothing more, nothing less. Not to mention, with the questionable government America currently has, the trigger happy police force and the high crime rates over there compared to the UK, I see no reason why I'd want to move to America; it's big, vast and full of arrogant, egoistical people. That may be a gross generalisation, but our friends across the pond bring it on themselves.

I'd much rather live in my little city called Sheffield, a city where the typical, superficial Americans trying to live 'the dream' would never dream of moving to, and be proud of it - it's my Sheffield I was born and bred in. Not some state over in America trying to big itself up and ultimately failing at doing so.

Rant over.
^^ this
/endthread
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sunshine774
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(Original post by Kangaroo17)
How? Both aren't.
Imo UK isn't but the US is
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fridgecomet
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(Original post by Kian Stevens)
*sigh*

So many young, easily influenced teenagers see America as a country full of big, lush states which are crammed full of showbiz and superstars. They dream of nothing more than to live somewhere like New York, California or Florida, simply because their favourite celebrity lives there and it allegedly looks like the best place to live, 'ever'. These 'personal reasons' are merely that they want to escape to a country which emanates false perceptions of itself.

In reality, only a few places in America really fit the naive criteria these teenagers have. The rest are just your standard. every day cities, like here in the UK - nothing more, nothing less. Not to mention, with the questionable government America currently has, the trigger happy police force and the high crime rates over there compared to the UK, I see no reason why I'd want to move to America; it's big, vast and full of arrogant, egoistical people. That may be a gross generalisation, but our friends across the pond bring it on themselves.

I'd much rather live in my little city called Sheffield, a city where the typical, superficial Americans trying to live 'the dream' would never dream of moving to, and be proud of it - it's my Sheffield I was born and bred in. Not some state over in America trying to big itself up and ultimately failing at doing so.

Rant over.
damn is that really what other countries think of us
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Sheperd23
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Well yeah, i have sort of been 'americanised' - after all, they speak english, and they do produce a lot in terms of culture music etc. And i know there are poor parts, but i primarily want to go there for nature in a way.

I want to be able to travel across states for days, across deserts, through forest, and just live in those small towns, where people are more isolated you know?

I want to be able to live in a place where i can get to know people better, and live as a community i guess.

Welp better get back to revision.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by random_matt)
From one **** hole to another.
I think the USA and UK are both great places to live with excellent higher education and good job opportunities in scientific research and technology.
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Kian Stevens
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I think the USA and UK are both great places to live with excellent higher education and good job opportunities in scientific research and technology.
Why on Earth a Briton would want to go to MIT or Harvard instead of Cambridge or Oxford is beyond me - you could pay a huge fraction less to study at Cambridge or Oxford, which is just as high up the international university rankings as MIT or Harvard.

Again, it's another one of those 'Ooooh, I wanna go to America!!!' stories, and then people end up paying tens of thousands of dollars for their little trip across the pond, when they could stay in the UK instead.
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yusyus
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(Original post by Kian Stevens)
Why on Earth a Briton would want to go to MIT or Harvard instead of Cambridge or Oxford is beyond me - you could pay a huge fraction less to study at Cambridge or Oxford, which is just as high up the international university rankings as MIT or Harvard.

Again, it's another one of those 'Ooooh, I wanna go to America!!!' stories, and then people end up paying tens of thousands of dollars for their little trip across the pond, when they could stay in the UK instead.
is it not true that theres a lot more financial aid available at MIT/Harvard compared to Oxford. Also at the American unis you mentioned you get a bigger range of subjects/modules you can pick.

Anyway isn't this derailing the thread abit? does anyone know whether the OP would be fine moving to the US?
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Kian Stevens
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(Original post by yusyus)
is it not true that theres a lot more financial aid available at MIT/Harvard compared to Oxford. Also at the American unis you mentioned you get a bigger range of subjects/modules you can pick.

Anyway isn't this derailing the thread abit? does anyone know whether the OP would be fine moving to the US?
I looked at Harvard's financial aid plan; it assumes your parents earn x amount of money and have y amount of money in additional assets.

x is an average amount (£30k), y seems to assume people have \approx £50k in assets.

You'll still be talking thousands of pounds for the average family.
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yusyus
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(Original post by Kian Stevens)
I looked at Harvard's financial aid plan; it assumes your parents earn x amount of money and have y amount of money in additional assets.

x is an average amount (£30k), y seems to assume people have \approx £50k in assets.

You'll still be talking thousands of pounds for the average family.
That's not considering the large number of external scholarships offered at Harvard/MIT. And the fact that MIT/Harvard's graduate salary is miles better than Oxbridge.
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Ggg1112
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(Original post by random_matt)
Norway, want to be surrounded by trees, forest etc. High standard of living too.
The dream. Trees, mountains, dirt bikes and adrenaline :]
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