Predictions for A-level AQA psychology paper 2?

Watch
Leah//
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
Does anyone have any predictions on what might be on paper 2?
0
reply
Mk1237
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
(Original post by Leah//)
Does anyone have any predictions on what might be on paper 2?
I feel like there's going to be a big marker on localisation of function.
4
reply
examstruggles99
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 year ago
#3
(Original post by Mk1237)
I feel like there's going to be a big marker on localisation of function.
yeah I have a feeling that could show for Bio... has Sperry and Split brain research been on recently?

hoping research methods is going to be kind in this exam! Approaches should be alright- do you reckon comparison of approaches could be a big marker?

Zeitgebers and endogenous pacemakers could be quite likely... and synaptic transmission always comes up seemingly.
0
reply
Mk1237
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
(Original post by examstruggles99)
yeah I have a feeling that could show for Bio... has Sperry and Split brain research been on recently?

hoping research methods is going to be kind in this exam! Approaches should be alright- do you reckon comparison of approaches could be a big marker?

Zeitgebers and endogenous pacemakers could be quite likely... and synaptic transmission always comes up seemingly.
No I don't think Sperry and split brain research has been on recently. I agree I think EZ and EP's may come up.
I think for approaches they're going to ask about the psychodynamic approach.
I am dreading research methods!!!
0
reply
examstruggles99
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 year ago
#5
(Original post by Mk1237)
No I don't think Sperry and split brain research has been on recently. I agree I think EZ and EP's may come up.
I think for approaches they're going to ask about the psychodynamic approach.
I am dreading research methods!!!
Psychodynamic came up last year with the ID, ego and sueprego...

this is what another post has written:
Approaches:It basically says SLT and cognitive approach are highly likely, with humanistic least likely..
Biopsychology: biological rhythms and split brain research, and endogenous and exogenous are likely

according to someone on The Student Room





Approaches


  • Origins of Psychology: Wundt, introspection and the emergence of Psychology as a science.
  • Learning approaches: the behaviourist approach, including classical conditioning and Pavlov’s research, operant conditioning, types of reinforcement and Skinner’s research;social learning theory including imitation, identification, modelling, vicarious reinforcement, the role of mediational processes and Bandura’s research.
  • The cognitive approach: the study of internal mental processes, the role of schema, the use of theoretical and computer models to explain and make inferences about mental processes. The emergence of cognitive neuroscience. I really think this will come up as a 16 mark question, because it's hardly been asked!
  • The biological approach: the influence of genes, biological structures and neurochemistry on behaviour. Genotype and phenotype, genetic basis of behaviour, evolution and behaviour.
  • The psychodynamic approach: the role of the unconscious, the structure of personality, that is Id, Ego and Superego, defence mechanisms including repression, denial and displacement, psychosexual stages.
  • Humanistic Psychology: free will, self-actualisation and Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, focus on the self, congruence, the role of conditions of worth. The influence on counselling Psychology - Last year's 16 mark question, has come up a lot in specimen papers.
  • Comparison of approaches.





4.2.2 Biopsychology

  • The divisions of the nervous system: central and peripheral (somatic and autonomic).
  • The structure and function of sensory, relay and motor neurons. The process of synaptic transmission, including reference to neurotransmitters, excitation and inhibition.
  • The function of the endocrine system: glands and hormones.
  • The fight or flight response including the role of adrenaline.
  • Localisation of function in the brain and hemispheric lateralisation: motor, somatosensory, visual, auditory and language centres; Broca’s and Wernicke’s areas, split brain research. Plasticity and functional recovery of the brain after trauma. - There were quite a few questions on plasticity last year (+ a few RM marks) but not much on Sperry's research. Localisation is hit or miss.
  • Ways of studying the brain: scanning techniques, including functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI); electroencephalogram (EEGs) and event-related potentials (ERPs); post-mortem examinations. - 8 mark question last year.
  • Biological rhythms: circadian, infradian and ultradian and the difference between these rhythms. The effect of endogenous pacemakers and exogenous zeitgebers on the sleep/wake cycle. I have a really strong feeling these will pop up, because there has hardly been much about them recently. Could be a 16 mark question.



It's harder to theorise for research methods, because everything is so linked, but I doubt there'll be much on observations because that came up a lot recently. Probably not graphs since we already did that in Paper One. They might ask us stuff on reliability or validity, sampling techniques or case studies.
0
reply
Mk1237
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 year ago
#6
(Original post by examstruggles99)
Psychodynamic came up last year with the ID, ego and sueprego... this is what another post has written:


according to someone on The Student Room





Approaches


  • Origins of Psychology: Wundt, introspection and the emergence of Psychology as a science.
  • Learning approaches: the behaviourist approach, including classical conditioning and Pavlov’s research, operant conditioning, types of reinforcement and Skinner’s research;social learning theory including imitation, identification, modelling, vicarious reinforcement, the role of mediational processes and Bandura’s research.
  • The cognitive approach: the study of internal mental processes, the role of schema, the use of theoretical and computer models to explain and make inferences about mental processes. The emergence of cognitive neuroscience. I really think this will come up as a 16 mark question, because it's hardly been asked!
  • The biological approach: the influence of genes, biological structures and neurochemistry on behaviour. Genotype and phenotype, genetic basis of behaviour, evolution and behaviour.
  • The psychodynamic approach: the role of the unconscious, the structure of personality, that is Id, Ego and Superego, defence mechanisms including repression, denial and displacement, psychosexual stages.
  • Humanistic Psychology: free will, self-actualisation and Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, focus on the self, congruence, the role of conditions of worth. The influence on counselling Psychology - Last year's 16 mark question, has come up a lot in specimen papers.
  • Comparison of approaches.





4.2.2 Biopsychology

  • The divisions of the nervous system: central and peripheral (somatic and autonomic).
  • The structure and function of sensory, relay and motor neurons. The process of synaptic transmission, including reference to neurotransmitters, excitation and inhibition.
  • The function of the endocrine system: glands and hormones.
  • The fight or flight response including the role of adrenaline.
  • Localisation of function in the brain and hemispheric lateralisation: motor, somatosensory, visual, auditory and language centres; Broca’s and Wernicke’s areas, split brain research. Plasticity and functional recovery of the brain after trauma. - There were quite a few questions on plasticity last year (+ a few RM marks) but not much on Sperry's research. Localisation is hit or miss.
  • Ways of studying the brain: scanning techniques, including functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI); electroencephalogram (EEGs) and event-related potentials (ERPs); post-mortem examinations. - 8 mark question last year.
  • Biological rhythms: circadian, infradian and ultradian and the difference between these rhythms. The effect of endogenous pacemakers and exogenous zeitgebers on the sleep/wake cycle. I have a really strong feeling these will pop up, because there has hardly been much about them recently. Could be a 16 mark question.



It's harder to theorise for research methods, because everything is so linked, but I doubt there'll be much on observations because that came up a lot recently. Probably not graphs since we already did that in Paper One. They might ask us stuff on reliability or validity, sampling techniques or case studies.

I really hate the emergence of cognitive neuroscience doesn't come up lol i've always ignored that when revising
1
reply
dannydevil117
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 year ago
#7
(Original post by examstruggles99)
Psychodynamic came up last year with the ID, ego and sueprego...

this is what another post has written:
Approaches:It basically says SLT and cognitive approach are highly likely, with humanistic least likely..
Biopsychology: biological rhythms and split brain research, and endogenous and exogenous are likely

according to someone on The Student Room






Approaches



  • Origins of Psychology: Wundt, introspection and the emergence of Psychology as a science.
  • Learning approaches: the behaviourist approach, including classical conditioning and Pavlov’s research, operant conditioning, types of reinforcement and Skinner’s research;social learning theory including imitation, identification, modelling, vicarious reinforcement, the role of mediational processes and Bandura’s research.
  • The cognitive approach: the study of internal mental processes, the role of schema, the use of theoretical and computer models to explain and make inferences about mental processes. The emergence of cognitive neuroscience. I really think this will come up as a 16 mark question, because it's hardly been asked!
  • The biological approach: the influence of genes, biological structures and neurochemistry on behaviour. Genotype and phenotype, genetic basis of behaviour, evolution and behaviour.
  • The psychodynamic approach: the role of the unconscious, the structure of personality, that is Id, Ego and Superego, defence mechanisms including repression, denial and displacement, psychosexual stages.
  • Humanistic Psychology: free will, self-actualisation and Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, focus on the self, congruence, the role of conditions of worth. The influence on counselling Psychology - Last year's 16 mark question, has come up a lot in specimen papers.
  • Comparison of approaches.





4.2.2 Biopsychology

  • The divisions of the nervous system: central and peripheral (somatic and autonomic).
  • The structure and function of sensory, relay and motor neurons. The process of synaptic transmission, including reference to neurotransmitters, excitation and inhibition.
  • The function of the endocrine system: glands and hormones.
  • The fight or flight response including the role of adrenaline.
  • Localisation of function in the brain and hemispheric lateralisation: motor, somatosensory, visual, auditory and language centres; Broca’s and Wernicke’s areas, split brain research. Plasticity and functional recovery of the brain after trauma. - There were quite a few questions on plasticity last year (+ a few RM marks) but not much on Sperry's research. Localisation is hit or miss.
  • Ways of studying the brain: scanning techniques, including functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI); electroencephalogram (EEGs) and event-related potentials (ERPs); post-mortem examinations. - 8 mark question last year.
  • Biological rhythms: circadian, infradian and ultradian and the difference between these rhythms. The effect of endogenous pacemakers and exogenous zeitgebers on the sleep/wake cycle. I have a really strong feeling these will pop up, because there has hardly been much about them recently. Could be a 16 mark question.



It's harder to theorise for research methods, because everything is so linked, but I doubt there'll be much on observations because that came up a lot recently. Probably not graphs since we already did that in Paper One. They might ask us stuff on reliability or validity, sampling techniques or case studies.
How would you structure a 16 marker on the effect of endogenous pacemakers and exogenous zeitgebers on the sleep/wake cycle would it be like outline what they are then studies so siffre?
0
reply
examstruggles99
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 year ago
#8
(Original post by dannydevil117)
How would you structure a 16 marker on the effect of endogenous pacemakers and exogenous zeitgebers on the sleep/wake cycle would it be like outline what they are then studies so siffre?
Yeah I guess talking about like the SCN and light and everything and the studies that go with it.. it could be an 8 marker potentially?
0
reply
dannydevil117
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 year ago
#9
(Original post by examstruggles99)
Yeah I guess talking about like the SCN and light and everything and the studies that go with it.. it could be an 8 marker potentially?
Ah yeah makes sense also what's the difference between a circadian and ultradian rhythm because I thought ultradian was the sleep cycle so rem etc but apparently the sleep/wake cycle is circadian
0
reply
examstruggles99
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 year ago
#10
(Original post by dannydevil117)
Ah yeah makes sense also what's the difference between a circadian and ultradian rhythm because I thought ultradian was the sleep cycle so rem etc but apparently the sleep/wake cycle is circadian
Ultradian rhythms are stages of the sleep/wake cycle- the 5 stages with REM being last.
Circadian means a 24 hour cycle so the sleep wake cycle is a circadian rhythm as its 24 hours.
0
reply
examstruggles99
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 year ago
#11
(Original post by Mk1237)
I really hate the emergence of cognitive neuroscience doesn't come up lol i've always ignored that when revising
All I would write for that is - its a scientific study of the influence of brain structures on mental processing and mapping brain areas to specific functions...
Broca's area was identified and advances in brain image techniques allow scientists to systematically observe and describe the neurological basis of mental processes.

Short n sweet!
1
reply
Sisyphus1
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 year ago
#12
Anyone got any advice on writing a 'plan a study/experiment' question? My teacher wasn't great for this and I can't find anything online, cheers
0
reply
nataliak
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#13
Report 1 year ago
#13
Look up Tutor2u Design a study on Youtube, also Psych Boost made a great video on this too!
1
reply
Mk1237
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#14
Report 1 year ago
#14
(Original post by examstruggles99)
All I would write for that is - its a scientific study of the influence of brain structures on mental processing and mapping brain areas to specific functions...
Broca's area was identified and advances in brain image techniques allow scientists to systematically observe and describe the neurological basis of mental processes.

Short n sweet!
How much marks do you think a question on cognitive neuroscience could be max?
0
reply
farah1999
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#15
Report 1 year ago
#15
(Original post by examstruggles99)
Psychodynamic came up last year with the ID, ego and sueprego...

this is what another post has written:
Approaches:It basically says SLT and cognitive approach are highly likely, with humanistic least likely..
Biopsychology: biological rhythms and split brain research, and endogenous and exogenous are likely

according to someone on The Student Room






Approaches



  • Origins of Psychology: Wundt, introspection and the emergence of Psychology as a science.
  • Learning approaches: the behaviourist approach, including classical conditioning and Pavlov’s research, operant conditioning, types of reinforcement and Skinner’s research;social learning theory including imitation, identification, modelling, vicarious reinforcement, the role of mediational processes and Bandura’s research.
  • The cognitive approach: the study of internal mental processes, the role of schema, the use of theoretical and computer models to explain and make inferences about mental processes. The emergence of cognitive neuroscience. I really think this will come up as a 16 mark question, because it's hardly been asked!
  • The biological approach: the influence of genes, biological structures and neurochemistry on behaviour. Genotype and phenotype, genetic basis of behaviour, evolution and behaviour.
  • The psychodynamic approach: the role of the unconscious, the structure of personality, that is Id, Ego and Superego, defence mechanisms including repression, denial and displacement, psychosexual stages.
  • Humanistic Psychology: free will, self-actualisation and Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, focus on the self, congruence, the role of conditions of worth. The influence on counselling Psychology - Last year's 16 mark question, has come up a lot in specimen papers.
  • Comparison of approaches.





4.2.2 Biopsychology

  • The divisions of the nervous system: central and peripheral (somatic and autonomic).
  • The structure and function of sensory, relay and motor neurons. The process of synaptic transmission, including reference to neurotransmitters, excitation and inhibition.
  • The function of the endocrine system: glands and hormones.
  • The fight or flight response including the role of adrenaline.
  • Localisation of function in the brain and hemispheric lateralisation: motor, somatosensory, visual, auditory and language centres; Broca’s and Wernicke’s areas, split brain research. Plasticity and functional recovery of the brain after trauma. - There were quite a few questions on plasticity last year (+ a few RM marks) but not much on Sperry's research. Localisation is hit or miss.
  • Ways of studying the brain: scanning techniques, including functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI); electroencephalogram (EEGs) and event-related potentials (ERPs); post-mortem examinations. - 8 mark question last year.
  • Biological rhythms: circadian, infradian and ultradian and the difference between these rhythms. The effect of endogenous pacemakers and exogenous zeitgebers on the sleep/wake cycle. I have a really strong feeling these will pop up, because there has hardly been much about them recently. Could be a 16 mark question.



It's harder to theorise for research methods, because everything is so linked, but I doubt there'll be much on observations because that came up a lot recently. Probably not graphs since we already did that in Paper One. They might ask us stuff on reliability or validity, sampling techniques or case studies.
I dont think an essay for cognitive approach will come up since there was a 16 marker on cognitive therapies in paper 1
1
reply
examstruggles99
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#16
Report 1 year ago
#16
(Original post by Mk1237)
How much marks do you think a question on cognitive neuroscience could be max?
4-6 maybe? but I'm not expert haha.. good luck today Ive been up since 5.30 cramming
0
reply
Mk1237
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#17
Report 1 year ago
#17
(Original post by examstruggles99)
4-6 maybe? but I'm not expert haha.. good luck tiday0 Ive been up since 5.30 cramming
Hahah I’m going to start going over it now. Thank you good luck to you too!!
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Had lockdown impacted your relationships?

Yes, my partner and I are struggling (11)
7.19%
Yes, my partner and I broke up (12)
7.84%
Yes, it's hard being around my family so much (37)
24.18%
Yes, I'm feeling lonely isolating alone (16)
10.46%
No, nothing has changed (51)
33.33%
No, it's helped improve my relationships (26)
16.99%

Watched Threads

View All