[ANSWERS] OCR A-Level Latin: Unseen Translation (Thursday 5 June 2018)

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Shane Thomas
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Answer for exam: OCR A-Level Latin: Unseen Translation (H443/01), Thursday 5 June 2018 - Afternoon

Correct translation of the Prose:

Latin:

ut fama rei gestae Romam perlata est, omnes Maximum laudibus ad caelum tulerunt. par gloria apud Hannibalem hostesque Poenos erat; tum primum senserunt *** Romanis atque in Italia bellum esse, nam Poeni biennio ante et duces Romanos et milites adeo spreverant ut vix *** eadem gente bellum esse crederent cuius terribilem famam a patribus accepissent.

dum haec geruntur in Italia, Geminus consul *** classe centum viginti navium, circumvectus oram Sardiniae, ad Africam navigavit et, priusquam in continentem escensiones faceret, Menige insula vastata et decem talentis argenti acceptis ab incolentibus Cercinam ne et ipsorum ager diriperetur, ad litora Africae accessit copiasque exposuit. inde milites ad populandum agrum emissi. in insidias autem temere inlati, *** locorum ignari ab gnaris circumvenirentur, *** multa caede ac foeda fuga retro ad naves repulsi sunt. ad mille hominum *** quaestore admissum est. classis ab litoribus plenis hostium in Siciliam cursum tenuit, ubi tradita est praetori ut ab legato eius Romam reduceretur.

Livy, The History Of Rome, Book 22, Chapters 30-31

English:

As rumour of the matter waged spread through Rome, everyone carried Maximus to the skies with praises. There was equal glory (among/that reached) Hannibal and the enemy Carthaginians; then, for the first time, they realised that there was a war with the Romans and in Italy. For the Carthaginians had despised both the Roman soldiers and leaders for a period of 2 years previously, to such an extent that they could scarcely believe that there was a war with that same (people/nation) whose frightful reputation they had heard about from their fathers/forebears.

While these things were happening in Italy, the consul Geminus, having sailed around the coast of Sardinia with a fleet of 120 ships, sailed to Africa, and before he docked his ships on land, since the island of Menix had been razed and 10 talents of silver had been received from the inhabitants of Cercina, so that [even] their own land would not be plundered, [Geminus] approached the shores of Africa and spread out his forces. Then soldiers were sent out to ravage the land. But having rashly laid in ambush, when those who were unfamiliar with the places were surrounded by those familiar with them, they were driven back to their ships in a disgraceful [flight/retreat] with much bloodshed. Up to 1,000 men were lost along with the [quaestor/leader].

When the fleet had set sail from the shores filled with the enemy, he (Geminus) held a course towards Sicily, where it was reported to the praetor that it (the fleet) was being led back to Rome by his (the praetor's) commander.

Correct translation of the Verse:

Latin:

sed tamen ante alios, Ceae pulcherrime gentis,
gratus erat, Cyparisse, tibi: tu pabula cervum
ad nova, tu liquidi ducebas fontis ad undam,
tu modo texebas varios per cornua flores,

Aestus erat mediusque dies, solisque vapore
fessus in herbosa posuit sua corpora terra
cervus et arborea frigus ducebat ab umbra.
hunc puer inprudens iaculo Cyparissus acuto
fixit et, ut saevo morientem vulnere vidit,
velle mori statuit. quae non solacia Phoebus
dixit et, ut leviter pro materiaque doleret,
admonuit! gemit ille tamen munusque supremum
hoc petit a superis, ut tempore lugeat omni.

iamque per inmensos egesto sanguine fletus
in viridem verti coeperunt membra colorem,
ingemuit tristisque deus 'lugebere nobis
lugebisque alios aderisque dolentibus' inquit.

Ovid, Metamorphoses X, lines 120-123, 126, 128-137, 141-142.
Omitted lines: 124-125, 127, 138-140.

English:

But nevertheless, it was thanks to you, before any other, Cyparissus,
Most handsome of the Cean race,
You were leading the stag to new pastures,
To the wave of the flowing spring,
And you alone were sometimes weaving various flowers through its horns,

It was hot and it was the middle of the day,
And tired from the warmth of the Sun,
the stag placed its body on the grassy earth,
And a chill was coming from the tree-covered shade.

Cyparissus, a foolish boy, pierced it (the stag) with a sharp javelin,
And when he saw it dying from the cruel wound,
He decided he wished to die.

What uncomforting words did Apollo offer?
He warned him to mourn lightly, in proportion to the situation!
But he (Cyparissus) groaned and asked for this final favour from the gods:
That he mourn for all of time.

And now, through his boundless tears,
After his blood had been poured out,
His limbs began to turn a green colour.

The sad god groaned and said:
"You shall be mourned by us and you will mourn other,
And you will be present to those who are grieving."

And this was the scansion question:

_ v v|_ v v|_ v v|_ _|_ v v|_ x
aestus erat mediusque dies solisque vapore

Hope this helps!
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Shane Thomas
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See attached: .docx version of the Paper 1 (Unseen Translation) answers.
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maddddddie
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Thank you! How did you find the comprehension?
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Shane Thomas
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The comprehension was going fine until question 5. Spent soooo long on it that I sorta ran out of time for the grammar questions.
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Martins1
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(Original post by Shane Thomas)
English:

But nevertheless, it was thanks to you, before any other, Cyparissus,
Most handsome of the Cean race,
You were leading the stag to new pastures,
To the wave of the flowing spring,
And you alone were sometimes weaving various flowers through its horns,
"but, however, it was pleasing to you before any other, O Cyparissus" I think? That was quite tricky.
Also translation of "liquidus" as flowing is really nice, but I put "clear" - think that's ok?
It was hot and it was the middle of the day,
And tired from the warmth of the Sun,
the stag placed its body on the grassy earth,
And a chill was coming from the tree-covered shade.
ah this was the one thing I struggled with. I put "And it was coming cold from the shade of the tree" - is that ok?
Cyparissus, a foolish boy, pierced it (the stag) with a sharp javelin,
And when he saw it dying from the cruel wound,
He decided he wished to die.

What uncomforting words did Apollo offer?
He warned him to mourn lightly, in proportion to the situation!
But he (Cyparissus) groaned and asked for this final favour from the gods:
That he mourn for all of time.
Pretty sure it was "What comforting words did Apollo not offer?"? Also "that he could mourn for all time", I think.
And now, through his boundless tears,
After his blood had been poured out,
His limbs began to turn a green colour.
I'd probably put "after his blood had been poured out" after "through his boundless tears" but it was a bit weird. Also, dang it, I put "immense tears" rather than "boundless" - I still should get 4/5, right?
The sad god groaned and said:
"You shall be mourned by us and you will mourn other,
And you will be present to those who are grieving."
I put the same but the "us" was a minor error since it was probably a poetic plural (should be "mourned by me" - I did the same lol)
And this was the scansion question:

_ v v|_ v v|_ v v|_ _|_ v v|_ x
aestus erat mediusque dies solisque vapore
Caesura was between "-es" and "sol-".
Pretty sure there was a second line too for which herbosa was all long and the rest was like:
_ v v|_ _|_// _|_ v v|_ v v|_ x
fessus in herbosa posuit sua corpora terra
Hope this helps! And best of luck for tomorrow morning's Comprehension paper
I hope the paper went well for you too! Just annoyed I failed to remember that it was a potential subjunctive at the end and made a silly mistake on quaero. Do you know what type of genitive "scelerum" is - I didn't put anything down, just a translation, but I think it was an objective genitive?

(Original post by Shane Thomas)
Correct translation of the Prose:
English:

As rumour of the matter waged spread through Rome, everyone carried Maximus to the skies with praises.
Doesn't "res gestae" as a phrase mean "exploits"? That's what I wrote - "rumour of his exploits". Don't think it matters but I think "ad caelum" was sing (but both translations make sense tbh)?
There was equal glory (among/that reached) Hannibal and the enemy Carthaginians;
Oooh "that reached" is a nice translation - I wrote "his glory was equal..."..?
then, for the first time, they realised that there was a war with the Romans and in Italy.
ah yeah this bit i sort of ished, i said it "they realised there was the first war" (since "primum" and "bellum" could agree). Do you think I'd get 4 or 5?
For the Carthaginians had despised both the Roman soldiers and leaders for a period of 2 years previously, to such an extent that they could scarcely believe that there was a war with that same (people/nation) whose frightful reputation they had heard about from their fathers/forebears.
the only annoying bit was that i thought "spreverant" was "scattered" so I wrote "had scattered before both the Roman soldiers and leaders for a period of two years" - that should be a 4, right?
While these things were happening in Italy, the consul Geminus,
"were being waged"? Idk that's what I put. I thought it was referring to the wars in Italy.
having sailed around the coast of Sardinia with a fleet of 120 ships, sailed to Africa, and before he docked his ships on land, since the island of Menix had been razed and 10 talents of silver had been received from the inhabitants of Cercina, so that [even] their own land would not be plundered,
I like your improvements upon the translation. The "et" in that last phrase was "would not be plundered also", i think, rather than "even".
[Geminus] approached the shores of Africa and spread out his forces. Then soldiers were sent out to ravage the land. But having rashly laid in ambush, when those who were unfamiliar with the places were surrounded by those familiar with them, they were driven back to their ships in a disgraceful [flight/retreat] with much bloodshed.
it was so hard to render the "rashly having been brought in to ambush" into nice english - I went with "But having been brought into an ambush rashly". I interpreted this as "they were driven back with much slaughter with a disgraceful flight back to the ships" but I think it's really hard to put into nice English.
Up to 1,000 men were lost along with the [quaestor/leader].
I put "about" for "ad" - not sure if that's ok?
When the fleet had set sail from the shores filled with the enemy, he (Geminus) held a course towards Sicily, where it was reported to the praetor that it (the fleet) was being led back to Rome by his (the praetor's) commander.
That last bit cannot be indirect speech because there would be no "ut" and it would be acc + infinitive (something like "ubi traditum est praetori classem Romam ab legato eius reducta esse". Pretty sure it was "when it was handed over to the praetor so that it could be led back to Rome by its ambassador." Not sure if "eius" refers to "praetori" or "classem" to be honest - probably could be either, although I prefer your choice of the praetor.

I really hope these went well for you and thanks so much for putting this together!

(Original post by Shane Thomas)
The comprehension was going fine until question 5. Spent soooo long on it that I sorta ran out of time for the grammar questions.
Oh no! How come? Was that the 10 marker on him being frustrated and despairing..?
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Martins1
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Thought I'd add a mark scheme for the Comprehension today. Apologies, I didn't do the composition:

OCR A-Level Latin: Latin Comprehension and Composition (H443/02), Friday 08 June 2018 - Morning

Latin: (red denotes an edit from the original; *** denotes omission, green denotes that this is the original but not the adapted version we had; yellow denotes that the word was glossed)
nuntiata interim etiam ceterorum exercituum defectione, litteras prandenti sibi traditas concerpsit, mensam subvertit, duos scyphos magni pretii in terram deiecit *** . veneno et in auream pyxidem condito transiit in hortos Servilianos, ubi praemissis libertorum fidissimis Ostiam ad classem praeparandam, tribunos centurionesque praetorii de fugae societate temptavit. sed aliis tergiversantibus, aliis aperte recusantibus, *** varie in animo agitavit utrum Parthos (**) supplex peteret, an (***) prodiret in forum (***) veniam scelerum a Romanis precaretur, ac nisi animos flexisset, vel ut Aegypti praefecturam concedi sibi oraret.***

sic cogitatione in posterum diem dilata, excitatus ad mediam fere noctem, ut cognavit stationem militum discessisse, prosiluit e lecto et emissis servis circum amicos, et quia nihil a quoquam renuntiabatur, ipse domos eorum complures adiit. verum portis omnium clausis et respondente nullo in cubiculum rediit, unde iam (**) custodes diffugerant, direptis etiam stragulis, amota et pyxide veneni; ac (***) Spiculum gladiatorem vel aliem quemquam, cuius manu periret, quaesivit et nemine reperto "ergo ego" inquit "nec amicum habeo, nec inimicum?" procurritque, quasi praecipitaturus se in Tiberim.

Nero 47, Suetonius

(I can't quite remember some of the adaption they did).

Questions:

1) "nuntiata...deiecit"
a) What news did Nero receive? [1]
b) What shows that Nero was very unhappy about the news? [3] [not sure about the wording of this...]

2) "veneno...temptavit" [5]
What did Nero immediately do in response? [again, unsure about wording]

3) "sed...oraret" [6]
What options was Nero considering? [wording]

4) Translate "sic...adiit". [10]

5) How does Suetonius show that Nero becomes increasingly frustrated and despaired? [10]

6) State and explain the case of the following:
a) "prandenti" [2]
b) "scelerum" [2]

7) Give the active infinitive of the following verbs:
a) "emissis" [1]
b) "quaesivi" [1]

8) What part of the verb are each of the following?
a) "praeparandam" [1]
b) "flexisset" [1]
c) "praecipitaturus" [1]

9) Explain, using a translation if helpful, the grammar of the following phrases:
a) "aliis tergiversantibus... [?]" [2]
b) "cuius manu periret" [4]

Total: 50 marks.

Mark Scheme/Answers:
1)
a) He received news that the rest of the army was revolting against him (1)
b) He tore up the letters (1), he flipped the table (1) and he threw down against the ground expensive goblets (1)

2) Then when he had hidden poison in a golden box, (1) he went across into the Servilian gardens, (1) where having sent ahead the most trustworthy slave to Ostia (1) to prepare the fleet in advance (1), he tried to convince the tribunes and the centurions of the praetorian guard (1) to be allies for his flight (1). [5 points = 5 marks: not necessary to get every point]

3) (But with some disagreeing, with some openly refusing, he considered in his mind whether) to seek the Pathians (1) as a suppliant, (1) or to surrender himself in the forum (1) and pray forgiveness for his crimes from the Romans (1), and unless he changed their minds, (1) to beg the Egyptians to allow him in. (1)
[possibility that there will be more points on offer and you didn't need to get all of these, but I'm unsure - if so "pray forgiveness" and "for his crimes from the Romans" are probably (2); maybe even "beg the Egyptians" and "to allow him in" = (2)]

4) Thus with his consideration/thinking(/decision) having been brought down(/reduced) to the last day, having been awoken/roused about in the middle of the night, as he thought that the guard of soldiers had departed (5) / he jumped up out of his bed and when he had sent his slaves around his friends, since nothing was reported back by anyone, he went to several houses of those (friends) himself. (5)

5) Indeed when all the gates were closed (1) and with no response (1) he returned to his bedroom (1)
Whence all the guards had already left (1)
He tore up his bed-sheets (1)
He moved out the poison (1) from the box (1) (considering suicide) (1)
He asked the gladiator Scipulus (1) or anyone else (1) by whose hand he could die (1)
He found no-one (1)
He said "I have neither friend (1) nor foe" (1)
He ran forward as if about to throw himself headlong (1) into the river Tiber (1)
[10 points = 10 marks: not necessary to get every point]

6)
a) "prandenti" = dative, agreeing with indirect object "sibi": "he tore up the letters which had been handed over to him while eating his lunch"
State and explain the case of the following:
b) "scelerum" = genitive, [I think it is objective genitive but am not sure]: "forgiveness of his crimes"

7)
a) emittere
b) quaerere

8)
a) "praeparandam" = gerundive (of purpose)
b) "flexisset" = (pluperfect active) subjunctive
c) "praecipitaturus" = future (active) participle

9)
a) "aliis tergiversantibus... [?]" = ablative absolute (ablative masculine plural) with "tergiversantibus" (or whatever it was) being a present participle: "with some disagreeing"
b) "cuius manu periret": "by whose hand he might die". "cuius" = genitive of possession, from "qui". "manu" = ablative of instrument. "periret" = potential subjunctive, third person singular imperfect.

I hope this helps and please do correct any errors, particularly in the Latin text as I can't quite remember some bits...
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Oreatex
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Thanks for this, what do you think the grade boundaries will be for both papers?
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Martins1
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(Original post by Oreatex)
Thanks for this, what do you think the grade boundaries will be for both papers?
Personally I think it's hard to tell...but hold in for a bit of a ride cos it's kinda confusing:
Since we are doing a new specification there is literally no suggestion from OCR about possible grade boundaries. All we have to work with is the grade boundaries from the old specification which are very low. However, having looked at examiner's reports, it seems that much of the difficulty on those papers were the unseen literary analysis (which we don't do) and a lack of time (it was VERY time pressured). Moreover, their literature was completely different and quite a bit harder.
The 2017 Prose paper (language and lit) required 84 for 100 UMS, 76 for 90 UMS (A*), 68 for 80 UMS (A), 62 for 70 UMS (B) and 52 for 60 UMS (C).
The 2017 Verse paper (again, lang & lit) required 85 for 100 UMS, 78 for 90 UMS (A*), 71 for 80 UMS (A), 64 for 70 UMS (B) and 57 for 60 UMS (C).
But also remember that they needed 90% at A2 for an A* and 80% average including their AS for an A.

This year's papers: The Unseen paper seemed to be considered difficult, but I don't think it was harder than the time-pressured one the old specification suffered. The Comprehension paper seemed to be considered pretty easy, so I reckon that'll help.

I reckon that grade boundaries will be something like:
Unseen Paper (/100)
85 = A*
77 = A
70 = B
62 = C

Prose Comp Paper (/50)
44 = A*
40 = A
36 = B
32 = C
Or something...
I could be wildly wrong!
Let's see for the Literature though...
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trueblood99
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How did people find the Prose paper?
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Shane Thomas
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I had a great time with the Prose paper (as far as exams go). Of course, it's insanely time-pressured, but I was writing good points from start to finish and managed to bluff a conclusion as the invigilator took my paper away.What questions did you find hard, if any? I found them all really ideal, open ended questions.

I'm surprised how much I struggled with Language, I normally do much better in Language than Literature.
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trueblood99
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Literally had the exact same experience as you. Found the language harder than expected, which is unusual, and loved the literature paper. Thought it was a godsend, especially the 20 market.
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