Why is it so bad to be posh? Watch

Anonymous #1
#1
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I realise this is a bit tiny-violin territory, so hear me out, but it seems to me that nowadays it has become acceptable to dismiss someone’s opinions, abilities, right to a complex interior life, emotions etc. purely on the basis that they’re a bit posh? And now being posh is something to be ashamed about?

Now, posh is completely to do with perspective: to a working class lad I'm probably posh- to someone like David Cameron I'm probably not. My parents are middle-class, I was born in the south of England, I went to a state primary, and I went to a private school on a scholarship. Now I'm at uni (not a 'posh' one), there have many been times when I have been completely shunned and/or laughed at just because I went to a private school, even before that person has gotten to know me. Now, I do understand when it's banter, but there have been times when it's been serious and bitter.

In my view, I think it's to do with comfort and privilege. People assume I've never worked for anything and have had everything handed to me on a silver platter. That I don't know what it's like to suffer, thus can't really relate. That's probably true in some areas- there was never not food on the table in my house for example. But in other areas it's not true; I was bullied constantly at all my schools and attempted suicide a few years ago for example. I also worked very hard during school time. So I do know what hardship feels like. But even if I didn't suffer any hardships, should that generate animosity against me? Does that really make me unrelatable? If someone who was apparently posh and had a privileged upbringing wasn't out of touch, arrogant, or ignorant (which to me is what being posh implies) then should they be shut down, despite the fact they're a nice, decent guy or girl? Of course not. As long as they're a nice guy or girl who does good, you shouldn't hate them and be bitter.

Basically, if I'm saying anything, it's this: no one can choose which family they were born into. What matters is what a person does and how they act. Granted, people who are arrogant so and sos usually have gone to a private school. But so many 'posh' people are nice, kind hearted people. Similarly, some working-class people are arrogant, ignorant so and sos. Judge people on their character, not on their past. And if someone makes fun of you for using fancy words, or saying bath as "barth", then it says a lot more about them than it does about you. Same goes for if you're bullied for pronouncing bath as "bahth" (you get what I mean). You should never feel guilty or even proud of what circumstances you were born in to, since it was nothing to do with you. So wherever you come from, own it.

Well, that question turned out to be a rhetorical one. Thanks for reading
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birthdefect
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#2
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I realise this is a bit tiny-violin territory, so hear me out, but it seems to me that nowadays it has become acceptable to dismiss someone’s opinions, abilities, right to a complex interior life, emotions etc. purely on the basis that they’re a bit posh? And now being posh is something to be ashamed about?

Now, posh is completely to do with perspective: to a working class lad I'm probably posh- to someone like David Cameron I'm probably not. My parents are middle-class, I was born in the south of England, I went to a state primary, and I went to a private school on a scholarship. Now I'm at uni (not a 'posh' one), there have many been times when I have been completely shunned and/or laughed at just because I went to a private school, even before that person has gotten to know me. Now, I do understand when it's banter, but there have been times when it's been serious and bitter.

In my view, I think it's to do with comfort and privilege. People assume I've never worked for anything and have had everything handed to me on a silver platter. That I don't know what it's like to suffer, thus can't really relate. That's probably true in some areas- there was never not food on the table in my house for example. But in other areas it's not true; I was bullied constantly at all my schools and attempted suicide a few years ago for example. I also worked very hard during school time. So I do know what hardship feels like. But even if I didn't suffer any hardships, should that generate animosity against me? Does that really make me unrelatable? If someone who was apparently posh and had a privileged upbringing wasn't out of touch, arrogant, or ignorant (which to me is what being posh implies) then should they be shut down, despite the fact they're a nice, decent guy or girl? Of course not. As long as they're a nice guy or girl who does good, you shouldn't hate them and be bitter.

Basically, if I'm saying anything, it's this: no one can choose which family they were born into. What matters is what a person does and how they act. Granted, people who are arrogant so and sos usually have gone to a private school. But so many 'posh' people are nice, kind hearted people. Similarly, some working-class people are arrogant, ignorant so and sos. Judge people on their character, not on their past. And if someone makes fun of you for using fancy words, or saying bath as "barth", then it says a lot more about them than it does about you. Same goes for if you're bullied for pronouncing bath as "bahth" (you get what I mean). You should never feel guilty or even proud of what circumstances you were born in to, since it was nothing to do with you. So wherever you come from, own it.

Well, that question turned out to be a rhetorical one. Thanks for reading
This is so nice
Relate to quite a few points actually. I have always lived in middle-class places (both my parents and my sister grew up in London and they moved to Kent when my mum fell pregnant with me because they wanted “a better life for me” but lowkey hate it lmao) but I commute to a pretty standard public school everyday. The uni I’m going to is nothing special either in terms of social class.
But I occasionally still get treated really weirdly because of where I grew up. I’m told I’m the “whitest person ever” because I have a big house in a middle-class village. I don’t even know
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DrawTheLine
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This was a lot of thinking going on for you before 7am.
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Anonymous #1
#4
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I realise this is a bit tiny-violin territory, so hear me out, but it seems to me that nowadays it has become acceptable to dismiss someone’s opinions, abilities, right to a complex interior life, emotions etc. purely on the basis that they’re a bit posh? And now being posh is something to be ashamed about?

Now, posh is completely to do with perspective: to a working class lad I'm probably posh- to someone like David Cameron I'm probably not. My parents are middle-class, I was born in the south of England, I went to a state primary, and I went to a private school on a scholarship. Now I'm at uni (not a 'posh' one), there have many been times when I have been completely shunned and/or laughed at just because I went to a private school, even before that person has gotten to know me. Now, I do understand when it's banter, but there have been times when it's been serious and bitter.

In my view, I think it's to do with comfort and privilege. People assume I've never worked for anything and have had everything handed to me on a silver platter. That I don't know what it's like to suffer, thus can't really relate. That's probably true in some areas- there was never not food on the table in my house for example. But in other areas it's not true; I was bullied constantly at all my schools and attempted suicide a few years ago for example. I also worked very hard during school time. So I do know what hardship feels like. But even if I didn't suffer any hardships, should that generate animosity against me? Does that really make me unrelatable? If someone who was apparently posh and had a privileged upbringing wasn't out of touch, arrogant, or ignorant (which to me is what being posh implies) then should they be shut down, despite the fact they're a nice, decent guy or girl? Of course not. As long as they're a nice guy or girl who does good, you shouldn't hate them and be bitter.

Basically, if I'm saying anything, it's this: no one can choose which family they were born into. What matters is what a person does and how they act. Granted, people who are arrogant so and sos usually have gone to a private school. But so many 'posh' people are nice, kind hearted people. Similarly, some working-class people are arrogant, ignorant so and sos. Judge people on their character, not on their past. And if someone makes fun of you for using fancy words, or saying bath as "barth", then it says a lot more about them than it does about you. Same goes for if you're bullied for pronouncing bath as "bahth" (you get what I mean). You should never feel guilty or even proud of what circumstances you were born in to, since it was nothing to do with you. So wherever you come from, own it.

Well, that question turned out to be a rhetorical one. Thanks for reading
agreed. Nothing to be ashamed about. It seems if you're not working class you're a posh twit!
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jeezboyz
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I dont hate posh people i am working class with 2 parents who went to university so i think im not stupid but by no means clever. I was on work experience last year with girls from a private schools all my age. Im a 16 yr old guy for me it was a real challenge i went to 2 state schools and i say words like mate and what i would consider normal phrases and to be honest they where rude to me for it . I dont hate posh people but u need to accept ur privilege. And ive never met a normal posh person like someone who i understand they all have been rather stuck up so from my experience they are condescending but ik not all of you are like that
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