username2899906
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#1
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I was told by my teacher to not actually mention the statement in my answer. The answer would argue the point (or go against the point), but I would never mention the statement. However, some people on here sound like they mentioned the actual statement in the answer. Why?
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euphrosynay
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you can indeed mention the statement if you want to, but i think that there would be a danger of not addressing the whole statement in your answer.
not quoting the statement, and structuring your answer around points that you have made yourself, can help since you won't have to address each part of the statement in the same depth; instead, you can use what you know about the general themes mentioned, and have a free structure for your extended answer.
besides, not mentioning the statement from the start can make considering other sides to the argument seem more natural. the view given is intended to be simple and provocative, allowing you to argue strongly for/against it, but it is also intended for you to consider a more nuanced and thoughtful argument - one which you will reflect in your answer.
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_medo_
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(Original post by euphrosynay)
you can indeed mention the statement if you want to, but i think that there would be a danger of not addressing the whole statement in your answer.
not quoting the statement, and structuring your answer around points that you have made yourself, can help since you won't have to address each part of the statement in the same depth; instead, you can use what you know about the general themes mentioned, and have a free structure for your extended answer.
besides, not mentioning the statement from the start can make considering other sides to the argument seem more natural. the view given is intended to be simple and provocative, allowing you to argue strongly for/against it, but it is also intended for you to consider a more nuanced and thoughtful argument - one which you will reflect in your answer.
I was wondering just how closely you had to abide by the statement. I didn't talk about corruption or money, but instead focused on the aspect of "winning by any means necessary" and disagreed, arguing that sports needs to stay competitive and referenced junior football leagues. My actual article was good, but I'm worried about how many marks I'm going to lose for not abiding by it strictly.
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UDZ
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No need to abide strictly to the prompt in either of the question 5s, you get marks from AOs, not from following the question accurately.
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euphrosynay
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(Original post by _medo_)
I was wondering just how closely you had to abide by the statement. I didn't talk about corruption or money, but instead focused on the aspect of "winning by any means necessary" and disagreed, arguing that sports needs to stay competitive and referenced junior football leagues. My actual article was good, but I'm worried about how many marks I'm going to lose for not abiding by it strictly.
that's all fair enough, but i don't think you're in danger of losing many marks at all. this question in particular also offered the positive view (sports should be fun, fair and open to everyone) - if you've addressed that statement, the other one, or both, then you probably have sufficient content. since you referenced junior football leagues, you would be using an example of something that is open to youth, and aimed to be both competitive and fun at the same time, while corrupted aims of gaining money would ruin the experience of children... or something similar. as long as your points were consistently well-argued, the content of your answer will be convincing.
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_medo_
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(Original post by euphrosynay)
that's all fair enough, but i don't think you're in danger of losing many marks at all. this question in particular also offered the positive view (sports should be fun, fair and open to everyone) - if you've addressed that statement, the other one, or both, then you probably have sufficient content. since you referenced junior football leagues, you would be using an example of something that is open to youth, and aimed to be both competitive and fun at the same time, while corrupted aims of gaining money would ruin the experience of children... or something similar. as long as your points were consistently well-argued, the content of your answer will be convincing.
Thanks for the response, much appreciated.
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