M_am
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Hello all i just finished foundation year and will be undertaking my first year of my degree which is Law. My foundation year was somewhat helpful however could have focused more on the basics of law and teaching it. I would like to ask for some advice on completing my first year. Any advice would be appreciated.
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LGBTvoice
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I've just completed my first year of studying law so I'll outline how it was for me:

It's been a year of ups and downs. The most important thing I could recommend you do is KEEP UP with the reading, as this will save you so much stress when it comes to revision from Easter onwards. I did the reading for seminars as and when the seminars came up, as this often covered the required reading for my modules anyway. I did very little further reading (I'm not advocating that, my results for first year are yet to be released so that could backfire on me)! But yeah, I only did required reading really, but that's because I was a first year that prioritised getting p*ssed most of the time. I will change next year lol.

If you need any help on any particular modules, I'll be more than happy to help you throughout your year if you pop me a message. I can answer more specific questions if you have any on how to make the most of first year as I could be here all day explaining the ins and outs of it.
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LawNI
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  • Don't stress too much
  • Do your reading and if you have the time the recommended reading
  • Keep your notes structured to make revision easier
  • Keep up with current events in the news
  • Have fun and engage in class
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Notoriety
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Read and reread your notes throughout the year rather than at the end when you're revising. Will make learning new stuff easier and you won't need to revise at all really.

With your notes, start simple and then build up the complexity. Think of it as layers; at first you just want to get the basic layer done and make sure you never missed any of it out. Then you can add a second layer covering the controversies in detail. Then the case quotes and sections in full. Then the articles: and use the same system when you're adding stuff, simple overview of the addition at first and then you can add quotes and all the more advanced stuff.
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M_am
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Thank you very much i appreciate ur honesty and thank you for your help.
(Original post by LGBTvoice)
I've just completed my first year of studying law so I'll outline how it was for me:

It's been a year of ups and downs. The most important thing I could recommend you do is KEEP UP with the reading, as this will save you so much stress when it comes to revision from Easter onwards. I did the reading for seminars as and when the seminars came up, as this often covered the required reading for my modules anyway. I did very little further reading (I'm not advocating that, my results for first year are yet to be released so that could backfire on me)! But yeah, I only did required reading really, but that's because I was a first year that prioritised getting p*ssed most of the time. I will change next year lol.

If you need any help on any particular modules, I'll be more than happy to help you throughout your year if you pop me a message. I can answer more specific questions if you have any on how to make the most of first year as I could be here all day explaining the ins and outs of it.
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M_am
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Oh thank you i like how you layer your notes i have adhd so i find it hard to concentrate so i think i will take on your technique.
(Original post by Notoriety)
Read and reread your notes throughout the year rather than at the end when you're revising. Will make learning new stuff easier and you won't need to revise at all really.

With your notes, start simple and then build up the complexity. Think of it as layers; at first you just want to get the basic layer done and make sure you never missed any of it out. Then you can add a second layer covering the controversies in detail. Then the case quotes and sections in full. Then the articles: and use the same system when you're adding stuff, simple overview of the addition at first and then you can add quotes and all the more advanced stuff.
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M_am
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Definitely! Thank you for ur good advice😊
(Original post by LawNI)
  • Don't stress too much
  • Do your reading and if you have the time the recommended reading
  • Keep your notes structured to make revision easier
  • Keep up with current events in the news
  • Have fun and engage in class
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evalilyXOX
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Obviously this isn't an option available to everyone but if possible, I would recommend using a laptop/ipad/tablet during lectures. This can be quite a controversial topic for some people who hate the sound of keys tapping during class , but it's just way more convenient for editing purposes.

I used notepads in my 1st year and so I wasted so much time having to either type out everything from the lecture or re-write it out more neatly, and having to try to decipher what I had actually written at the time because of my messy rushed handwriting.
It also means that if you do the essential reading after class then it can be slotted into the same document and everything is much cleaner and more time efficient.

Good luck for 1st year !
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(Original post by evalilyXOX)
Obviously this isn't an option available to everyone but if possible, I would recommend using a laptop/ipad/tablet during lectures. This can be quite a controversial topic for some people who hate the sound of keys tapping during class , but it's just way more convenient for editing purposes.

I used notepads in my 1st year and so I wasted so much time having to either type out everything from the lecture or re-write it out more neatly, and having to try to decipher what I had actually written at the time because of my messy rushed handwriting.
It also means that if you do the essential reading after class then it can be slotted into the same document and everything is much cleaner and more time efficient.

Good luck for 1st year !
Hi! Thank you very much for ur advice! I definitely 100% agree my hand writing when rushed is appalling and i end up missing vital information i may buy a dictaphone seeing as i learn better by watching and listening to content.
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(Original post by M_am)
Hi! Thank you very much for ur advice! I definitely 100% agree my hand writing when rushed is appalling and i end up missing vital information i may buy a dictaphone seeing as i learn better by watching and listening to content.
Yeah a dictaphone is a good idea but just make sure your uni allows their use as I know that at my university you either have to gain permission specifically from the lecturer or it is simply not allowed unless for accessibility purposes
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BR260799
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Hi, I've just finished my first year of Law School less than a week ago. When I started I completely underestimated not only the amount of work that was required but also the complexity of some areas law.

The first piece of advice i'd give you is to get a structure in note taking - are you writing, typing, are you going to have a separate notes for your lectures and one for you seminar etc etc. This is really important because I spent the entirety of my first semester going through loads of different formats of taking notes - I kept going from making revision notes, to lecture notes, then I gave up on lecture notes and made seminar notes, lets just say I had no structure and then I got to easter and didn't have a complete set of notes, so instead of revising over easter I was still making my notes. This therefore resulted in me having to cram my revision in 3 weeks after easter which was not easy.

This brings me on to my second piece of advice - understand the relationship between lectures and seminars. Lectures are examinable content - but you will be examined on the content of your seminars. I really wish I learned this early in the year - whilst lectures are important for a starting point, do not spent ages going over lecture notes - seminars are a powerful tool in law school, make the most of them. This means you should do all your seminar reading (and i mean all of it) and further reading surrounding the seminar topics. I can say having done public law how grateful I am I prioritised this - because my exam was solely based on the seminars. This links onto another point - you are not expected to read the whole textbook - my Public law book is 800 pages and my contract law is 1400. The textbook is not designed for a specific university - read the topics as you learn in the seminars, these provide a greater detail.

Perhaps one of the most important points I can give you is case noting. Learn how to do it quickly. There's always been a lot of dispute about should I read the whole case, or should I look it up on a summary website? Unfortunately that's up to you, I took the easy way out and did the summary website, but I strongly advice you try to read cases in full - at least the fundamental ones. Another piece of advice when it comes to noting is when you are reading academic content like Journals, make very brief notes and create your own little summary (about 5/6 lines), this way you can remember it for the exam.

Another piece of advice actually surrounds the lectures - be careful who you sit next too. You want lectures to be enjoyable, but you don't want to be distracted, it could really put you off for the year and however tempted you are to leave lecture, especially in public law don't they are vital as lecturers are always stressing topics that you should revise.

I've got 2 more pieces of advice to give. Firstly, learn how to write coursework - it can really mess up your grades if you don't. Unfortunately I'm bad a coursework, but great at exams. Coursework requires a different skill set. And most of my coursework has been a 2:2 and the feedback I've been given is to answer the question set, do further reading and get a clear structure. The more academic content you read the better your essays will become because you can learn professional structures. A good idea in coursework is to first go over your lecture notes and do further reading on the topic area before you even plan the question.

My final piece of advice is if you don't understand something go see your tutor - my law tutors have been absolutely amazing in helping me focus my notes - which is crucial when it comes to exam season.
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Ashvxii
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(Original post by BR260799)
Hi, I've just finished my first year of Law School less than a week ago. When I started I completely underestimated not only the amount of work that was required but also the complexity of some areas law.

The first piece of advice i'd give you is to get a structure in note taking - are you writing, typing, are you going to have a separate notes for your lectures and one for you seminar etc etc. This is really important because I spent the entirety of my first semester going through loads of different formats of taking notes - I kept going from making revision notes, to lecture notes, then I gave up on lecture notes and made seminar notes, lets just say I had no structure and then I got to easter and didn't have a complete set of notes, so instead of revising over easter I was still making my notes. This therefore resulted in me having to cram my revision in 3 weeks after easter which was not easy.

This brings me on to my second piece of advice - understand the relationship between lectures and seminars. Lectures are examinable content - but you will be examined on the content of your seminars. I really wish I learned this early in the year - whilst lectures are important for a starting point, do not spent ages going over lecture notes - seminars are a powerful tool in law school, make the most of them. This means you should do all your seminar reading (and i mean all of it) and further reading surrounding the seminar topics. I can say having done public law how grateful I am I prioritised this - because my exam was solely based on the seminars. This links onto another point - you are not expected to read the whole textbook - my Public law book is 800 pages and my contract law is 1400. The textbook is not designed for a specific university - read the topics as you learn in the seminars, these provide a greater detail.

Perhaps one of the most important points I can give you is case noting. Learn how to do it quickly. There's always been a lot of dispute about should I read the whole case, or should I look it up on a summary website? Unfortunately that's up to you, I took the easy way out and did the summary website, but I strongly advice you try to read cases in full - at least the fundamental ones. Another piece of advice when it comes to noting is when you are reading academic content like Journals, make very brief notes and create your own little summary (about 5/6 lines), this way you can remember it for the exam.

Another piece of advice actually surrounds the lectures - be careful who you sit next too. You want lectures to be enjoyable, but you don't want to be distracted, it could really put you off for the year and however tempted you are to leave lecture, especially in public law don't they are vital as lecturers are always stressing topics that you should revise.

I've got 2 more pieces of advice to give. Firstly, learn how to write coursework - it can really mess up your grades if you don't. Unfortunately I'm bad a coursework, but great at exams. Coursework requires a different skill set. And most of my coursework has been a 2:2 and the feedback I've been given is to answer the question set, do further reading and get a clear structure. The more academic content you read the better your essays will become because you can learn professional structures. A good idea in coursework is to first go over your lecture notes and do further reading on the topic area before you even plan the question.

My final piece of advice is if you don't understand something go see your tutor - my law tutors have been absolutely amazing in helping me focus my notes - which is crucial when it comes to exam season.
This is such an articulate answer, as a future law student in September I am extremely grateful
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Audrey18
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BR260799


hi. I really enjoyed reading your post. if you could, please share more insights like how to answer exam question, how much reading you did, which subject was the most difficult, how was the teaching quality of the lecturers etc.
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M_am
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(Original post by BR260799)
Hi, I've just finished my first year of Law School less than a week ago. When I started I completely underestimated not only the amount of work that was required but also the complexity of some areas law.

The first piece of advice i'd give you is to get a structure in note taking - are you writing, typing, are you going to have a separate notes for your lectures and one for you seminar etc etc. This is really important because I spent the entirety of my first semester going through loads of different formats of taking notes - I kept going from making revision notes, to lecture notes, then I gave up on lecture notes and made seminar notes, lets just say I had no structure and then I got to easter and didn't have a complete set of notes, so instead of revising over easter I was still making my notes. This therefore resulted in me having to cram my revision in 3 weeks after easter which was not easy.

This brings me on to my second piece of advice - understand the relationship between lectures and seminars. Lectures are examinable content - but you will be examined on the content of your seminars. I really wish I learned this early in the year - whilst lectures are important for a starting point, do not spent ages going over lecture notes - seminars are a powerful tool in law school, make the most of them. This means you should do all your seminar reading (and i mean all of it) and further reading surrounding the seminar topics. I can say having done public law how grateful I am I prioritised this - because my exam was solely based on the seminars. This links onto another point - you are not expected to read the whole textbook - my Public law book is 800 pages and my contract law is 1400. The textbook is not designed for a specific university - read the topics as you learn in the seminars, these provide a greater detail.

Perhaps one of the most important points I can give you is case noting. Learn how to do it quickly. There's always been a lot of dispute about should I read the whole case, or should I look it up on a summary website? Unfortunately that's up to you, I took the easy way out and did the summary website, but I strongly advice you try to read cases in full - at least the fundamental ones. Another piece of advice when it comes to noting is when you are reading academic content like Journals, make very brief notes and create your own little summary (about 5/6 lines), this way you can remember it for the exam.

Another piece of advice actually surrounds the lectures - be careful who you sit next too. You want lectures to be enjoyable, but you don't want to be distracted, it could really put you off for the year and however tempted you are to leave lecture, especially in public law don't they are vital as lecturers are always stressing topics that you should revise.

I've got 2 more pieces of advice to give. Firstly, learn how to write coursework - it can really mess up your grades if you don't. Unfortunately I'm bad a coursework, but great at exams. Coursework requires a different skill set. And most of my coursework has been a 2:2 and the feedback I've been given is to answer the question set, do further reading and get a clear structure. The more academic content you read the better your essays will become because you can learn professional structures. A good idea in coursework is to first go over your lecture notes and do further reading on the topic area before you even plan the question.

My final piece of advice is if you don't understand something go see your tutor - my law tutors have been absolutely amazing in helping me focus my notes - which is crucial when it comes to exam season.
This answer was extremely helpful! Thank you i will defo take on everything you have explained perfectly!
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BR260799
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(Original post by Audrey18)
BR260799


hi. I really enjoyed reading your post. if you could, please share more insights like how to answer exam question, how much reading you did, which subject was the most difficult, how was the teaching quality of the lecturers etc.
(Original post by M_am)
This answer was extremely helpful! Thank you i will defo take on everything you have explained perfectly!
(Original post by Ashvxii)
This is such an articulate answer, as a future law student in September I am extremely grateful
Since i have my results now i'm in much better position to comment - I ended up getting 67% in my first year, just short of a first class.

Lectures were taught really well for contract and public law, the amount of information that was fitted into just 2 hours was quite amazing, and for these 2 subjects it really was the foundation of what you needed to know.

But having already done A Level law i didn't go to my criminal law lectures because i already knew the content. The English legal system was also a joke of a subject i didn't attend many lectures or seminars for that - my exam was multiple choice and very common sense based.

In terms of reading i did a lot for public law and contract - i didn't do any for ELS and i read a few academic articles on non fatal offences before my criminal exam.

Public law is by far the hardest subject - i don't know anyone in my year that did not struggle with the subject. I guess politics isn't my area of expertise. I read the entire 800 page textbook and 24 academic commentaries + cases and i came out with 55% in that module (a 2:2) but i had a very low graded coursework pulling my grade down, in the exam i averaged at 62%.

If you are looking for some preparation before university starts.

English Legal System: Look at the structure of the UK courts and tribunals, how to become a solicitor or barrister, what a judges paid? Are judges independent from influence.

Criminal Law: I can't recommend much for this. If you haven't done A Level or GCSE Law then maybe look at what is meant by Actus Reus and Mens Rea and if you have then i strongly recommend you keep on to the notes you already have including exam essays, as it will be useful.

Contract Law: At university with learn neo classical contract law, the law found in classical textbooks like Trietel which is the one i used. Try and understand why we learn what we do. All contracts must have Offer and Acceptance which is supported by consideration (i.e. both parties give each other something). It must not be made under duress or undue influence, there must not be any misrepresentations or breaches of condition or warranties as these will result in damages. A final topic area we learnt was discharge of obligations.

Public Law: I physically hated this module, lets say it got so bad i felt like quitting the degree . I recommending trying to understand what is meant by the following terms - Parliamentary sovereignty (Dicey), Rule of Law (Bare principle of legality, normative and substantive view) and Separation of Powers (Fusion and Strict Separation) as well as what is meant by an non codified constitution and maybe even what is the role of the judiciary, executive and legislature. Public law all links together just like contract, unlike criminal law you can't master individual topics, if you don't understand one you won't understand it at all. That's why examination questions in Contract and Public tend to be much broader.

My exams weren't too bad. I regret only starting revision after easter properly, but oh well. My English legal system as a MCQ test (which also had a large piece of coursework before hand worth 40% which i got a 3rd class in) and it really was common sense. Criminal law was quite a shock. We have a 30% seen question before on Homicide scenario just like A Level AQA exams and in the exam i had 1 hour to answer another scenario from a choice of 3 and 1 hour to write an essay from a choice of 6 (I picked one about the law on non fatal offences against the person requiring you to critically evaluate whether or not it is consistent). Contract law was 50% MCQ, 25% Scenario and 25% Essay based on a book we had to read . Public law was all essay based and before hand we did a 25% piece of coursework. Questions included, Is it fair to say that Parliament is always sovereign? To what extent is the separation of powers the most important doctrine? Parliaments mechanisms of holding the executive to account are fundamentally flawed, discuss. To what extent is the Bill of Rights likely to improve the Human Rights Act 1998 issues. And a scenario based on judicial review.

In relation to answering exam questions just do as you would do. In scenario questions state the RELEVANT LAW (do not go off and state everything you know about the law if it is not relevant do not put it, for example with homicide the Actus reus is unlawful killing of a reasonable creature in being - at university you will probably learn about 2 cases on reasonable creatures one about a foetus and one about life support, if there are no issues like this then just say X is clearly a person and so it is satisfied) then Apply the law to the facts. The aspect that probably helped me get my upper first class in criminal law is the fact i acted as if i was a barrister, as i would critically evaluate evidence and and evaluate that to reach a conclusion. Don't be afraid to try something risky. I remember writing about attempted murder on my timed assessment and one of the lectures laughed and i got full marks - it's all about being creative.
In relation to essays, do waste your time on introductions, just simply discuss an act or a question and this swiftly move on to what you will be talking about and then answer the question and then conclude. The more academic articles you read the better you will become because these are people who have been writing for centuries - follow their writing style and it will probably improve your essays. But universities also have a lot of writing skills workshops in the first few months and close to exam season too.

A few important acts i would looks at are the CRA 2005, Bill of Rights 1689, OAPA 1861, SGA/SGSA (Sale of goods/services act) and other important events like the Glorious revolution.
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Ashvxii
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(Original post by BR260799)
Hi, I've just finished my first year of Law School less than a week ago. When I started I completely underestimated not only the amount of work that was required but also the complexity of some areas law.

The first piece of advice i'd give you is to get a structure in note taking - are you writing, typing, are you going to have a separate notes for your lectures and one for you seminar etc etc. This is really important because I spent the entirety of my first semester going through loads of different formats of taking notes - I kept going from making revision notes, to lecture notes, then I gave up on lecture notes and made seminar notes, lets just say I had no structure and then I got to easter and didn't have a complete set of notes, so instead of revising over easter I was still making my notes. This therefore resulted in me having to cram my revision in 3 weeks after easter which was not easy.

This brings me on to my second piece of advice - understand the relationship between lectures and seminars. Lectures are examinable content - but you will be examined on the content of your seminars. I really wish I learned this early in the year - whilst lectures are important for a starting point, do not spent ages going over lecture notes - seminars are a powerful tool in law school, make the most of them. This means you should do all your seminar reading (and i mean all of it) and further reading surrounding the seminar topics. I can say having done public law how grateful I am I prioritised this - because my exam was solely based on the seminars. This links onto another point - you are not expected to read the whole textbook - my Public law book is 800 pages and my contract law is 1400. The textbook is not designed for a specific university - read the topics as you learn in the seminars, these provide a greater detail.

Perhaps one of the most important points I can give you is case noting. Learn how to do it quickly. There's always been a lot of dispute about should I read the whole case, or should I look it up on a summary website? Unfortunately that's up to you, I took the easy way out and did the summary website, but I strongly advice you try to read cases in full - at least the fundamental ones. Another piece of advice when it comes to noting is when you are reading academic content like Journals, make very brief notes and create your own little summary (about 5/6 lines), this way you can remember it for the exam.

Another piece of advice actually surrounds the lectures - be careful who you sit next too. You want lectures to be enjoyable, but you don't want to be distracted, it could really put you off for the year and however tempted you are to leave lecture, especially in public law don't they are vital as lecturers are always stressing topics that you should revise.

I've got 2 more pieces of advice to give. Firstly, learn how to write coursework - it can really mess up your grades if you don't. Unfortunately I'm bad a coursework, but great at exams. Coursework requires a different skill set. And most of my coursework has been a 2:2 and the feedback I've been given is to answer the question set, do further reading and get a clear structure. The more academic content you read the better your essays will become because you can learn professional structures. A good idea in coursework is to first go over your lecture notes and do further reading on the topic area before you even plan the question.

My final piece of advice is if you don't understand something go see your tutor - my law tutors have been absolutely amazing in helping me focus my notes - which is crucial when it comes to exam season.
(Original post by BR260799)
Since i have my results now i'm in much better position to comment - I ended up getting 67% in my first year, just short of a first class.

Lectures were taught really well for contract and public law, the amount of information that was fitted into just 2 hours was quite amazing, and for these 2 subjects it really was the foundation of what you needed to know.

But having already done A Level law i didn't go to my criminal law lectures because i already knew the content. The English legal system was also a joke of a subject i didn't attend many lectures or seminars for that - my exam was multiple choice and very common sense based.

In terms of reading i did a lot for public law and contract - i didn't do any for ELS and i read a few academic articles on non fatal offences before my criminal exam.

Public law is by far the hardest subject - i don't know anyone in my year that did not struggle with the subject. I guess politics isn't my area of expertise. I read the entire 800 page textbook and 24 academic commentaries + cases and i came out with 55% in that module (a 2:2) but i had a very low graded coursework pulling my grade down, in the exam i averaged at 62%.

If you are looking for some preparation before university starts.

English Legal System: Look at the structure of the UK courts and tribunals, how to become a solicitor or barrister, what a judges paid? Are judges independent from influence.

Criminal Law: I can't recommend much for this. If you haven't done A Level or GCSE Law then maybe look at what is meant by Actus Reus and Mens Rea and if you have then i strongly recommend you keep on to the notes you already have including exam essays, as it will be useful.

Contract Law: At university with learn neo classical contract law, the law found in classical textbooks like Trietel which is the one i used. Try and understand why we learn what we do. All contracts must have Offer and Acceptance which is supported by consideration (i.e. both parties give each other something). It must not be made under duress or undue influence, there must not be any misrepresentations or breaches of condition or warranties as these will result in damages. A final topic area we learnt was discharge of obligations.

Public Law: I physically hated this module, lets say it got so bad i felt like quitting the degree . I recommending trying to understand what is meant by the following terms - Parliamentary sovereignty (Dicey), Rule of Law (Bare principle of legality, normative and substantive view) and Separation of Powers (Fusion and Strict Separation) as well as what is meant by an non codified constitution and maybe even what is the role of the judiciary, executive and legislature. Public law all links together just like contract, unlike criminal law you can't master individual topics, if you don't understand one you won't understand it at all. That's why examination questions in Contract and Public tend to be much broader.

My exams weren't too bad. I regret only starting revision after easter properly, but oh well. My English legal system as a MCQ test (which also had a large piece of coursework before hand worth 40% which i got a 3rd class in) and it really was common sense. Criminal law was quite a shock. We have a 30% seen question before on Homicide scenario just like A Level AQA exams and in the exam i had 1 hour to answer another scenario from a choice of 3 and 1 hour to write an essay from a choice of 6 (I picked one about the law on non fatal offences against the person requiring you to critically evaluate whether or not it is consistent). Contract law was 50% MCQ, 25% Scenario and 25% Essay based on a book we had to read . Public law was all essay based and before hand we did a 25% piece of coursework. Questions included, Is it fair to say that Parliament is always sovereign? To what extent is the separation of powers the most important doctrine? Parliaments mechanisms of holding the executive to account are fundamentally flawed, discuss. To what extent is the Bill of Rights likely to improve the Human Rights Act 1998 issues. And a scenario based on judicial review.

In relation to answering exam questions just do as you would do. In scenario questions state the RELEVANT LAW (do not go off and state everything you know about the law if it is not relevant do not put it, for example with homicide the Actus reus is unlawful killing of a reasonable creature in being - at university you will probably learn about 2 cases on reasonable creatures one about a foetus and one about life support, if there are no issues like this then just say X is clearly a person and so it is satisfied) then Apply the law to the facts. The aspect that probably helped me get my upper first class in criminal law is the fact i acted as if i was a barrister, as i would critically evaluate evidence and and evaluate that to reach a conclusion. Don't be afraid to try something risky. I remember writing about attempted murder on my timed assessment and one of the lectures laughed and i got full marks - it's all about being creative.
In relation to essays, do waste your time on introductions, just simply discuss an act or a question and this swiftly move on to what you will be talking about and then answer the question and then conclude. The more academic articles you read the better you will become because these are people who have been writing for centuries - follow their writing style and it will probably improve your essays. But universities also have a lot of writing skills workshops in the first few months and close to exam season too.

A few important acts i would looks at are the CRA 2005, Bill of Rights 1689, OAPA 1861, SGA/SGSA (Sale of goods/services act) and other important events like the Glorious revolution.
Wow, congratulations on your fantastic score, 67% is amazing. Seems to be with law, many people just come close to a first. Thanks for this information, I will print it off to keep for reference. Hopefully if i have any questions you’ll still be lurking on here. What do you plan to do with your degree if you don’t mind me asking?
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Audrey18
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#17
BR260799


Let me first say thanks to you for taking the time off to write such a good post. There are a few here who set a daily target of posts to achieve but collectively, their input is nowhere near yours. I really hope you stay on this forum and continue sharing with us about your academic journey. There have been a few nice and good forum members like yourself but they either got banned cos they were telling the truth on other threads or they simply chose to not log onto this forum because they did not receive any appreciation whatsoever.

thank you.
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#18
Report 1 year ago
#18
(Original post by Ashvxii)
Wow, congratulations on your fantastic score, 67% is amazing. Seems to be with law, many people just come close to a first. Thanks for this information, I will print it off to keep for reference. Hopefully if i have any questions you’ll still be lurking on here. What do you plan to do with your degree if you don’t mind me asking?
Yeah i'm always here, usually check TSR once a day . Well after i finish undergraduate i'm going to do my masters in criminal law and then hopefully specialise in criminal law as a solicitor. But then again i'm quite tempted to work in the 3rd sector as a solicitor instead of actual practice because I'm currently at citizens advice as a part of my course.
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#19
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#19
(Original post by Audrey18)
BR260799


Let me first say thanks to you for taking the time off to write such a good post. There are a few here who set a daily target of posts to achieve but collectively, their input is nowhere near yours. I really hope you stay on this forum and continue sharing with us about your academic journey. There have been a few nice and good forum members like yourself but they either got banned cos they were telling the truth on other threads or they simply chose to not log onto this forum because they did not receive any appreciation whatsoever.

thank you.
Thanks and i will be doing. I'll be starting a Grow your grades thread in August when i get the motivation to start second year soy can pop by and read it
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#20
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#20
(Original post by Audrey18)
BR260799


Let me first say thanks to you for taking the time off to write such a good post. There are a few here who set a daily target of posts to achieve but collectively, their input is nowhere near yours. I really hope you stay on this forum and continue sharing with us about your academic journey. There have been a few nice and good forum members like yourself but they either got banned cos they were telling the truth on other threads or they simply chose to not log onto this forum because they did not receive any appreciation whatsoever.

thank you.
Oh shut the **** up.
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