Stay at uni or go back to permanent employment?

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sapunzel97
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Prior to attending uni, I worked for a year in an investment bank as an administrator. I really enjoyed it at the time, but did not feel pushed and was not busy. As well as this, I was going through a tough time personally. At the time, most of my other friends at uni.... long story short I applied to university!

I am now studying English Lit and Kent but am facing a dilemma. I love my course and I love the uni (recommend it to anyone) but I am debating giving it up and returning to full time employment. My main reason for this is: what am I going to do with my degree?!?!?!?!?!?!

I want to emphasise I love my degree, and I see the advantages of being a graduate BUT my year of experience would easily enable me to go back to full time employment, and I would look into taking professional qualifications.

I am mainly worried because I don't know what to do in the future... advice?
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jammy4041
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I'm a history graduate and they often say "there's no future in history."

With university, as with anything, it is important to buy into it 100% and to trust the process. If you love your degree, stay at university. Sometimes, it's about learning about a subject that is your passion. I took a history degree without thinking too much about what would happen after, because I wanted to enjoy university life and pursue my interest in the American Civil Rights Movement in greater detail.

You can go to employment fairs, converse with your university, and make use of their employment services. It's in a university's own interest to make sure that its students are prepared for employment. Your experience as an investment banker is a plus, but a degree gives you a whole lot of transferrable skills that employers will like, and it's important to move up. For instance, you have to manage your time effectively, work as group, show leadership, come up with your own dissertation project. Apply for graduate schemes, and the connections that you already have, when combined with your professor's references, will make for a very strong appplication when the time comes. They usually run from September so that is something to keep in mind.

If it's because you feel like you're not getting enough out of university life, make a conscious effort to join a society, maybe even a sports team. There's much more to university than just studying and employment opportunities (lol). I joined the American Football sports team at our university, and I'm now able to say that I was Health and Safety officer in my final year. I can say I was a good team-mate even if I didn't see the field often enough in my final year. There's a whole bunch of additional transferable skills that I have because of that decision to join the American Football team in my first year. Being a team player, effective communicator, leadership. Have you also considered some exchange opportunities as a liberal arts student? I went to the United States for my second year, and it brought additional experiences, that I would highly reccomend.

I got my piece of paper. Things might not have fallen into place for me yet, and I've been a graduate since 2016 now, but there's a whole bunch of opportunities that I am able to pursue because of my degree. With some hard work, they'll fall into place soon enough. If I could go back and change what I did, at university, I wouldn't. The only thing I would change is taking English instead of Further Maths at AS-Level and working harder in Year 12, because I would have had more balance to my A level subjects. My AS Levels were Maths, Physics, Further Maths and History and I never expected to pursue History as a degree choice initially, because I thought it would be in my interest to drop it and to pursue something involved in STEM because of the employment opportunities. I performed worst in Further Maths and had to drop it, however, around October in my Year 13 year, I just ended up liking History as a degree choice better, even if it had less employment opportunities.
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(Original post by sapunzel97)
Prior to attending uni, I worked for a year in an investment bank as an administrator. I really enjoyed it at the time, but did not feel pushed and was not busy. As well as this, I was going through a tough time personally. At the time, most of my other friends at uni.... long story short I applied to university!

I am now studying English Lit and Kent but am facing a dilemma. I love my course and I love the uni (recommend it to anyone) but I am debating giving it up and returning to full time employment. My main reason for this is: what am I going to do with my degree?!?!?!?!?!?!

I want to emphasise I love my degree, and I see the advantages of being a graduate BUT my year of experience would easily enable me to go back to full time employment, and I would look into taking professional qualifications.

I am mainly worried because I don't know what to do in the future... advice?
Stay at Uni.

Too many employers slap 'must have a degree' on every single job advert, or on every single list of requirements for promotions. Don't handicap yourself in the job market... if you have the chance to acquire a degree, acquire it. Especially if you love it.
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coffeetimeguys
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Some recent advice I got from a staff member at my uni: do complete uni but have some sort of job as well.
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sapunzel97
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How come you have not found work yet? What do you want to do?

(Original post by jammy4041)
I'm a history graduate and they often say "there's no future in history."

With university, as with anything, it is important to buy into it 100% and to trust the process. If you love your degree, stay at university. Sometimes, it's about learning about a subject that is your passion. I took a history degree without thinking too much about what would happen after, because I wanted to enjoy university life and pursue my interest in the American Civil Rights Movement in greater detail.

You can go to employment fairs, converse with your university, and make use of their employment services. It's in a university's own interest to make sure that its students are prepared for employment. Your experience as an investment banker is a plus, but a degree gives you a whole lot of transferrable skills that employers will like, and it's important to move up. For instance, you have to manage your time effectively, work as group, show leadership, come up with your own dissertation project. Apply for graduate schemes, and the connections that you already have, when combined with your professor's references, will make for a very strong appplication when the time comes. They usually run from September so that is something to keep in mind.

If it's because you feel like you're not getting enough out of university life, make a conscious effort to join a society, maybe even a sports team. There's much more to university than just studying and employment opportunities (lol). I joined the American Football sports team at our university, and I'm now able to say that I was Health and Safety officer in my final year. I can say I was a good team-mate even if I didn't see the field often enough in my final year. There's a whole bunch of additional transferable skills that I have because of that decision to join the American Football team in my first year. Being a team player, effective communicator, leadership. Have you also considered some exchange opportunities as a liberal arts student? I went to the United States for my second year, and it brought additional experiences, that I would highly reccomend.

I got my piece of paper. Things might not have fallen into place for me yet, and I've been a graduate since 2016 now, but there's a whole bunch of opportunities that I am able to pursue because of my degree. With some hard work, they'll fall into place soon enough. If I could go back and change what I did, at university, I wouldn't. The only thing I would change is taking English instead of Further Maths at AS-Level and working harder in Year 12, because I would have had more balance to my A level subjects. My AS Levels were Maths, Physics, Further Maths and History and I never expected to pursue History as a degree choice initially, because I thought it would be in my interest to drop it and to pursue something involved in STEM because of the employment opportunities. I performed worst in Further Maths and had to drop it, however, around October in my Year 13 year, I just ended up liking History as a degree choice better, even if it had less employment opportunities.
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jammy4041
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(Original post by sapunzel97)
How come you have not found work yet? What do you want to do?
I worked in retail for a year and a half after graduation in September 2016. I wanted to get some sort of financial stability. I want to be a teacher, but I'm working towards getting on a PGCE course on a school's direct application in September 2019. I'm between jobs at the moment after leaving retail. I couldn't take it anymore, and to be honest, my managers were awful. They made a good working environment toxic. I had various job opportunities fall through, but am now looking at teaching English in China. I've made it to the second stage of their process, and a pre-requisite is having a degree. Fingers crossed, it works out.

I considered a graduate scheme, but decided it wasn't for me. There's other things I can do with my degree if teaching doesn't work out.
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