paul634
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#1
I am a self-study student who had picked up A-level Biology, Chemistry and Maths. However, after about 2-3 weeks I have decided to switch up Maths for Psychology as I am finding Maths too difficult for me to study it independently in a year. I am really eager to go to uni next year to do Computer Science but as I have started more research it turns out many unis require A-level Maths.

My problem with A-level Maths is that I did not do the highest GCSE Maths tier and I believe that this is the reason I am struggling so much with it. I would not be able to afford a tutor more than once a week and so I do not know if it is possible for me to do a Computer Science course in uni.

Is A-level maths possible in a year when I am struggling so much? Any other advice is really appreciated.
0
reply
JXN
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#2
Report 3 years ago
#2
(Original post by paul634)
I am a self-study student who had picked up A-level Biology, Chemistry and Maths. However, after about 2-3 weeks I have decided to switch up Maths for Psychology as I am finding Maths too difficult for me to study it independently in a year. I am really eager to go to uni next year to do Computer Science but as I have started more research it turns out many unis require A-level Maths.

My problem with A-level Maths is that I did not do the highest GCSE Maths tier and I believe that this is the reason I am struggling so much with it. I would not be able to afford a tutor more than once a week and so I do not know if it is possible for me to do a Computer Science course in uni.

Is A-level maths possible in a year when I am struggling so much? Any other advice is really appreciated.
Alevel maths is possible to do in a year, depends on how determined all that stuff... GCSE is nothing to Alevel maths, but if you can have the ability to understand this and that and etc. You can. As long as you know the basics of GCSE maths i suppose would help (you dont need to be a high achiever...).

Use youtube tutorials from exam solutions etc to help you with maths.

Maths is all about doing past papers and questions repeatedly. The methods always or near the same and adapting to each question. So its just about you getting the grips of them the knowledge and appllication of alevel maths. As soon as you learn all the content, do a few questions from the exercise book when youve learnt the chapter. Then straight onto past palers and repeat papers. Maths is a constant learning & revision thing, per week or day (depending on your level of understanding).

btw, get out of this mindset that you have!
0
reply
username2339433
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#3
Report 3 years ago
#3
You can do comp sci without maths A-Level, but you may be limiting yourself in uni choices. From memory, I think when I applied to King's they said that if you didn't have A-Level maths then you had to have GCSE grade B and an A Level science, for example, but most other unis wanted maths. I think that if you just stick at maths, put the effort in and work hard then you could get at least B or a C, which will open up a lot of choices. I hated maths at GCSE, and ended up with a B at A level, so it's definitely possible.
0
reply
winterscoming
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#4
Report 3 years ago
#4
There are only around 20 universities in the country which require A-Level Maths for computer science - mostly these are the 'top ranked' academically prestigious universities whose courses are more intensely mathematical and theory-based. If Maths isn't your strong point, then these might not be right courses for you anyway because you'll be doing a lot of applied mathematics at those.

Have a look at this thread for a list of some universities which don't require A-Level Maths:
https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=5007920

Aside from the universities mentioned in that thead there are many other less academically prestigious universities who offer more vocational Computing-related degrees, whose courses, facilities and teaching staff are generally pretty solid for people wishing to learn the skills needed for Computing-related technical careers (e.g. Bournemouth or Staffordshire). Vocational Computing courses tend to put less emphasis on Maths and more emphasis on technical subjects like Programming, networking, databases, hardware systems, and are more oriented towards the kinds of skills you'd need as an IT professional.

Of course, without A-Level maths you will generally be expected to have at least a C at GCSE maths (or a B in some cases), so if your GCSE Maths is a problem then you may have a hard time, and it might be better for you to focus on that instead. (A-Level maths is much harder than GCSE)
0
reply
Svesh
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#5
Report 3 years ago
#5
(Original post by TheStudent19)
You can do comp sci without maths A-Level, but you may be limiting yourself in uni choices. From memory, I think when I applied to King's they said that if you didn't have A-Level maths then you had to have GCSE grade B and an A Level science, for example, but most other unis wanted maths. I think that if you just stick at maths, put the effort in and work hard then you could get at least B or a C, which will open up a lot of choices. I hated maths at GCSE, and ended up with a B at A level, so it's definitely possible.
How is computer science at kings compared to say Ucl and imperial and why such low entry requirements (AAB)
0
reply
Svesh
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#6
Report 3 years ago
#6
(Original post by paul634)
I am a self-study student who had picked up A-level Biology, Chemistry and Maths. However, after about 2-3 weeks I have decided to switch up Maths for Psychology as I am finding Maths too difficult for me to study it independently in a year. I am really eager to go to uni next year to do Computer Science but as I have started more research it turns out many unis require A-level Maths.

My problem with A-level Maths is that I did not do the highest GCSE Maths tier and I believe that this is the reason I am struggling so much with it. I would not be able to afford a tutor more than once a week and so I do not know if it is possible for me to do a Computer Science course in uni.

Is A-level maths possible in a year when I am struggling so much? Any other advice is really appreciated.
Its possible to learn a level maths old spec in less than a month.

I crammed mine the AS level in the 2 weeks easter holiday last year and got an A with 90s
0
reply
sonny.jim
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#7
Report 3 years ago
#7
Play to your strengths. Whether you're good at Mathematics or not, if you enjoy it and see an A-Level qualification in the subject benefitting you later on in life, take it. If you're a weak Mathematics student, either suck it up and put the time in, or don't, and get a good damn qualification in Computer Science. Many universities require an A-Level in Mathematics, and for good reason, if you don't have a solid understanding of Mathematics, you can find Computer Science a hard subject to grasp. It depends on the person, though if you're planning to go to a good university for Computer Science, you're going to have to play by their rules.
0
reply
username2339433
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#8
Report 3 years ago
#8
(Original post by Svesh)
How is computer science at kings compared to say Ucl and imperial and why such low entry requirements (AAB)
I'm at City at the moment, so I don't really know about King's. When I applied to Imperial their course was much more intense, every day 9-5 and very maths heavy. City isn't like that and I assume King's is probably a similar story.
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Feeling behind at school/college? What is the best thing your teachers could to help you catch up?

Extra compulsory independent learning activities (eg, homework tasks) (12)
7.45%
Run extra compulsory lessons or workshops (27)
16.77%
Focus on making the normal lesson time with them as high quality as possible (26)
16.15%
Focus on making the normal learning resources as high quality/accessible as possible (23)
14.29%
Provide extra optional activities, lessons and/or workshops (45)
27.95%
Assess students, decide who needs extra support and focus on these students (28)
17.39%

Watched Threads

View All