In need of urgent help from edexcel IGCSE chemistry A/A* lads? Watch

AspiringAccount
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Lads I frankly ain't wasting my time with doing experiments that are optional.


My question is.


Could I get an A without doing the experiments? and if so how?

The thing is the book gives an alright explanation of the experiment (diagrams and a short explanation). But I just need an answer to the question. Cheers lads.
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Sun Exotic
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If your school is corrupt like most they will pass your practical without even taking a glance. I know of 3 local schools which did this inc. mine because many of my class cba to do practical work. We all passed.
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AspiringAccount
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(Original post by Sun Exotic)
If your school is corrupt like most they will pass your practical without even taking a glance. I know of 3 local schools which did this inc. mine because many of my class cba to do practical work. We all passed.
I don't have a practical exam. this is IGCSE and i'm a homeschooler.
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Sun Exotic
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(Original post by AspiringAccount)
I don't have a practical exam. this is IGCSE and i'm a homeschooler.
Ah okay.
I'm not knowledgeable about your situation so I will refrain from further comments.

Good luck
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euphrosynay
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from the IGCSE chem 2017 spec:

experimental skills are assessed through written examinations.

importance of the experiments includes
- developing experimental and investigative skills based on correct and safe laboratory techniques
- analysing, interpreting and evaluating data and experimental methods
- drawing conclusions that are consistent with evidence from experimental activities and suggesting possible improvements and further investigations
- recognising the importance of accurate experimental work and reporting scientific methods in chemistry

it does help to do the practicals, but you can get to know the method, result and importance of each practical in depth if you study the method well, understand what each one helps prove, and have an awareness of where each one could go wrong (in terms of both inaccuracy and harm).

other skills include
• applying scientific knowledge and understanding in questions with a practical context
• making observations and measurements with appropriate precision, record these methodically and present them in appropriate ways
• identifying independent, dependent and control variables

this means that it's also good to know small details such as how precise each piece of equipment is, as well as being able to comment on features of experiments shown in unfamiliar situations.
it also wouldn't hurt to know the terms associated with scientific experiments, results and accuracy.

in summary, it's possible to know the practicals well without actually carrying them out, though it may take quite a bit of work.
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AspiringAccount
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(Original post by euphrosynay)
from the IGCSE chem 2017 spec:

experimental skills are assessed through written examinations.

importance of the experiments includes
- developing experimental and investigative skills based on correct and safe laboratory techniques
- analysing, interpreting and evaluating data and experimental methods
- drawing conclusions that are consistent with evidence from experimental activities and suggesting possible improvements and further investigations
- recognising the importance of accurate experimental work and reporting scientific methods in chemistry

it does help to do the practicals, but you can get to know the method, result and importance of each practical in depth if you study the method well, understand what each one helps prove, and have an awareness of where each one could go wrong (in terms of both inaccuracy and harm).

other skills include
• applying scientific knowledge and understanding in questions with a practical context
• making observations and measurements with appropriate precision, record these methodically and present them in appropriate ways
• identifying independent, dependent and control variables

this means that it's also good to know small details such as how precise each piece of equipment is, as well as being able to comment on features of experiments shown in unfamiliar situations.
it also wouldn't hurt to know the terms associated with scientific experiments, results and accuracy.

in summary, it's possible to know the practicals well without actually carrying them out, though it may take quite a bit of work.
I was just about ready to call it quits until the last part. Dude you got to recommend me a way of doing that. So where do I start? Cause honestly I hate practicals. And I really want an A.
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euphrosynay
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(Original post by AspiringAccount)
I was just about ready to call it quits until the last part. Dude you got to recommend me a way of doing that. So where do I start? Cause honestly I hate practicals. And I really want an A.
don't give up! it's easier than the spec makes it sound.

the first thing to do is probably to find the independent variable, dependent variable and then control variables.

independent variable: what you're changing in the experiment
dependent variable: what you're measuring in the experiment
control variables: what you're keeping the same throughout the experiment

often, if not always, the experiments will be investigating a relationship between the independent and dependent variable, and then drawing conclusions from that. each required practical will involve the same thing: changing the independent variable, measuring the dependent variable and seeing what the relationship can tell you.

once you know the variables of each experiment, it's easier to remember how they are measured or changed. at this stage, you should learn the equipment associated with these, and how they help towards the result.
note that sources of error can be found in the equipment itself - for example, human error from misreading it, or rounding error with a ruler.

methods may seem hard to tackle, but it's much easier when you know what the experiment is aiming to show, what's used to do so, and then how to get to that stage.
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AspiringAccount
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(Original post by euphrosynay)
don't give up! it's easier than the spec makes it sound.

the first thing to do is probably to find the independent variable, dependent variable and then control variables.

independent variable: what you're changing in the experiment
dependent variable: what you're measuring in the experiment
control variables: what you're keeping the same throughout the experiment

often, if not always, the experiments will be investigating a relationship between the independent and dependent variable, and then drawing conclusions from that. each required practical will involve the same thing: changing the independent variable, measuring the dependent variable and seeing what the relationship can tell you.

once you know the variables of each experiment, it's easier to remember how they are measured or changed. at this stage, you should learn the equipment associated with these, and how they help towards the result.
note that sources of error can be found in the equipment itself - for example, human error from misreading it, or rounding error with a ruler.

methods may seem hard to tackle, but it's much easier when you know what the experiment is aiming to show, what's used to do so, and then how to get to that stage.
So basically go through the CGP book then.
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euphrosynay
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(Original post by AspiringAccount)
So basically go through the CGP book then.
you could indeed just do that. from experience, i know it helps, but that may have been to fully remember what i actually did in the practical rather than to learn everything about it. but even the cgp information can be a lot to take in, so it helps if you know where and how to approach it in a way that means you'll remember it all. and if you end up forgetting parts under exam pressure or similar, you'll have a starting point to work your way from.
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Tahmidah
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Hey I was homeschooled up to year 11 and did IGCSE chemistry and got an A*. I'm not sure which exam board you are doing but I did edexcel and didn't do any of the practicals. As long as you learn the ones in the book you should be fine. Also do learn stuff like safety precautions ( wearing goggles, gloves, keeping flammable substances away from bunsen burners etc) as they could ask you about these.
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