Rhodesian
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So I am in year 12 and have just finished my AS levels.

I’m starting to think about what can boost my personal statement as I really want to study law at one of the best universities in the UK.

I want to come across very academic as I’ve been told this is what the top universities for law (Cambridge, LSE ect) like.
So I’ve decided to just read some books from the reading list for the universities I want to apply for and maybe include that in my personal statement.

Any recommendations for good, well known law books would be helpful.

Anyway, I’ve heard that you can sit and just watch court cases and I was just wondering how to do this.
Do I just go to court and sit in?
Or do I have to tell the court previously.
Also I want an interesting case so I would rather a criminal court case. Maybe like a murder or something like that.
Is it possible for me to watch one of these. Also am I old enough (I’m 17) to watch court cases especially violent criminal court cases.

I live in London, in Fulham.
Any courts near here that do viewings would be helpful.

Thanks for any help.
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alleycat393
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(Original post by Rhodesian)
So I am in year 12 and have just finished my AS levels.

I’m starting to think about what can boost my personal statement as I really want to study law at one of the best universities in the UK.

I want to come across very academic as I’ve been told this is what the top universities for law (Cambridge, LSE ect) like.
So I’ve decided to just read some books from the reading list for the universities I want to apply for and maybe include that in my personal statement.

Any recommendations for good, well known law books would be helpful.

Anyway, I’ve heard that you can sit and just watch court cases and I was just wondering how to do this.
Do I just go to court and sit in?
Or do I have to tell the court previously.
Also I want an interesting case so I would rather a criminal court case. Maybe like a murder or something like that.
Is it possible for me to watch one of these. Also am I old enough (I’m 17) to watch court cases especially violent criminal court cases.

I live in London, in Fulham.
Any courts near here that do viewings would be helpful.

Thanks for any help.
I'm not sure how you go about attending court (you may have to look this up) but law is an academic subject at uni so doesn't train you to be a lawyer. You need to show an academic interest in the law and attending court cases may not necessarily be the best use of your time as talking about court cases may make you come across as someone who doesn't know what studying law is about.
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Rhodesian
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(Original post by alleycat393)
I'm not sure how you go about attending court (you may have to look this up) but law is an academic subject at uni so doesn't train you to be a lawyer. You need to show an academic interest in the law and attending court cases may not necessarily be the best use of your time as talking about court cases may make you come across as someone who doesn't know what studying law is about.
So what do you think I should do?
I’m going to read a bunch of Law books over the summer but apart from that I’m not sure what to do.
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alleycat393
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(Original post by Rhodesian)
So what do you think I should do?
I’m going to read a bunch of Law books over the summer but apart from that I’m not sure what to do.
Your personal statement should be about your reading and academic interest in law. You can talk about any relevant transferable skills gained through extra curriculars and work so I’d say just do something you enjoy from which you’ll gain relevant skills.
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DJKL
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I suspect (as a non lawyer but the child of two lawyers) that your reading should be more about the process of legal thought (jurisprudence) and less about the actual details of the law from statute and case law. An overview of comparative approaches adopted in different jurisdictions and their evolution may assist.

My father read law at both Oxford and Edinburgh, neither he claimed taught him how to practice law, that came from his subsequent apprenticeship and the rest of his career, what they taught him was what he described as the ability to "think like a lawyer."

Knowing a little about particular areas/ aspects of law, probably superficially, is I suspect really not going to impress, knowing something about the thought processes and evolution of law, and legal thought, I suspect might be better appreciated.
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Mimir
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It's something great to talk about at interview but tbh a little dull for you because a) you don't know the law, and b) you don't know the facts unless you're at the opening statements of the trial.

I'd recommend looking at court listings for applications for administration orders, they're quick and easy to follow. You can find these on the cause lists a few days before. Or show up first thing (10am) and politely ask an usher what might be a good matter to go and hear. Then sit silently at the back for the duration.

However, the LLB focuses on the theory and academia, rather than practice of the Law so it gives you insight to the career not the course
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by Rhodesian)
So I am in year 12 and have just finished my AS levels.

I’m starting to think about what can boost my personal statement as I really want to study law at one of the best universities in the UK.

I want to come across very academic as I’ve been told this is what the top universities for law (Cambridge, LSE ect) like.
So I’ve decided to just read some books from the reading list for the universities I want to apply for and maybe include that in my personal statement.

Any recommendations for good, well known law books would be helpful.

Anyway, I’ve heard that you can sit and just watch court cases and I was just wondering how to do this.
Do I just go to court and sit in?
Or do I have to tell the court previously.
Also I want an interesting case so I would rather a criminal court case. Maybe like a murder or something like that.
Is it possible for me to watch one of these. Also am I old enough (I’m 17) to watch court cases especially violent criminal court cases.

I live in London, in Fulham.
Any courts near here that do viewings would be helpful.

Thanks for any help.
The age limit is 14.

Dress smartly but there is no need to be stupidly over-dressed.

No knives or other weapons are allowed. No photography or recording is allowed. Security staff can be awkward about phones for people not there in a professional role, so it perhaps easier to leave your phone at home.

It is useful as a law student to see a real trial or appeal. Although law is an academic discipline you will have a better understanding of how cases are actually determined.

The Old Bailey is probably the best venue for seeing a criminal case and the Royal Courts of Justice, a civil one. At the RCJ, go and sit in one of the cases in the Court of Appeal where you will see three judges setting what the law is.


This lists what is on at the RCJ for the following day

https://www.justice.gov.uk/courts/co...list-cause-rcj

What is on on Monday starts about halfway down

The Old Bailey is called the Central Criminal Court. Its list along with all the other Crown Courts is here. The list only goes live at 10:00 however so this is still Friday's list.

http://causelist.org/

You can Google the names of defendants and you will often find out what the case is about.
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