Books to read for a Law Personal Statement?

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Hlbusiness
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#1
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So I’m applying for some of the top unis and I understand this means my personal statement will have to be more achademic and show analytical skills.
I’m looking for some books to read to enhance my knowledge and improve my PS- I’ve heard of a book called “All About Law” and “The Law Machine” are these worth a read?
I’m not necessarily just looking to read about the law itself but does anyone know of any interesting books about society/injustice/inequality?
Thank you in advance
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Dolive21
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(Original post by Hlbusiness)
So I’m applying for some of the top unis and I understand this means my personal statement will have to be more achademic and show analytical skills.
I’m looking for some books to read to enhance my knowledge and improve my PS- I’ve heard of a book called “All About Law” and “The Law Machine” are these worth a read?
I’m not necessarily just looking to read about the law itself but does anyone know of any interesting books about society/injustice/inequality?
Thank you in advance
The Ethical Slut should prick their ears up, and is a perfectly serious set text on some advanced or specialist jurisprudence courses. More conservatively, and perhaps more conventionally, Justice for Hedgehogs would sound good, but if you're new to jurisprudence is a bit much (not least because it's 450 pages). If you fancy getting a handle on jurisprudence, which is generally where law academics talk about fairness and about law, society, and the interaction of those things, "Jurisprudence: Theory and Context" might interest you. It was a set text for my compulsory LLB introductory jurisprudence module.

Be warned that jurisprudence is not one of the seven foundations of legal knowledge, so it is not compulsory on all qualifying law degrees, and potentially could even not be an option at some universities. That is worth checking before you choose courses if you really want to study it, and even if it isn't important to you in the course, you may want to avoid overly focusing on your love of jurisprudence when applying to a university which doesn't cover it.
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DCDCo
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Its been mentioned a number of times on this forum, and I also offer this advice as someone who got into LSE Law which is seemingly very "PS-heavy". Dont just say you read a book, it means absolutely nothing. I'd say, get reading now and engage with something in the Law and then talk about how you engaged with it and develop that idea.
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Arbitio LNAT
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(Original post by Hlbusiness)
So I’m applying for some of the top unis and I understand this means my personal statement will have to be more achademic and show analytical skills.
I’m looking for some books to read to enhance my knowledge and improve my PS- I’ve heard of a book called “All About Law” and “The Law Machine” are these worth a read?
I’m not necessarily just looking to read about the law itself but does anyone know of any interesting books about society/injustice/inequality?
Thank you in advance
It is the quality of your reflections and analyses of what you have read that matters the most. Ensure also that it is speciifc and not vague - a tutor will be more keen to see a developed interest in law, because of some specific curiosity. Bookwise - it is more of an individual choice, and probably depends on your current stock of knowledge i.e. what interests have led you towards law.

For example, I could recommend The Structure of Liberty by R. Barnett; or Hayek's Law, Legislation and Liberty (although, it is a difficult text and harder to engage in without background knowledge on competing theories). Perhaps a bit of Hohfeld could work, but that is very technical - could show some great analytical prowess and is a vital contribution to the whole debate on what are "rights.". Another area apart from jurisprudence would be history of English Law - it is amazing to see how law can develop in most unusual and archaic ways.
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hotliketea
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maybe an unpopular addition, but i read none for my law personal statement , and i got offers from Kings and UCL. i had done an extended essay concerning animal rights, and i knew a bit about insurance law in particular because of work experience i'd done , but i really don't think unis look for every single applicant to spout texts. go for it if it interests you , but a statement can be just as good w/o imo.
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new1234
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(Original post by Hlbusiness)
So I’m applying for some of the top unis and I understand this means my personal statement will have to be more achademic and show analytical skills.
I’m looking for some books to read to enhance my knowledge and improve my PS- I’ve heard of a book called “All About Law” and “The Law Machine” are these worth a read?
I’m not necessarily just looking to read about the law itself but does anyone know of any interesting books about society/injustice/inequality?
Thank you in advance
Rule of Law
The trial
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Arbitio LNAT
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True, although not impossible. He did technically write with students in mind, and an edition with a sensible introduction should do a lot of demystifying. I think Hohfeld by itself would look try-hardish, but if mentioned within the research into debate on "rights" - https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/rights/
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