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Do most universities with offer conditions like ABB often accept grades like AAC?

Rah, I’m having the same questions hmu if you get an answer
yes but there is no guarentee of it.
Reply 2
@monad.dev
If you achieve the offer conditions then your place is guaranteed.

If you miss the requirements then the university will review your application alongside the other offer holders who also missed their offer. Depending on the number of available places left over and the strengths/weaknesses of your application compared to everyone else they will decline or accept you.

The universities receive all the A-level results a few days before you get them to give them time to make these final decisions.

AAC is reasonably likely to be accepted for an AAB offer. But, as I said, there's no guarantees.
Original post by Doonesbury
@monad.dev
If you achieve the offer conditions then your place is guaranteed.

If you miss the requirements then the university will review your application alongside the other offer holders who also missed their offer. Depending on the number of available places left over and the strengths/weaknesses of your application compared to everyone else they will decline or accept you.

The universities receive all the A-level results a few days before you get them to give them time to make these final decisions.

AAC is reasonably likely to be accepted for an AAB offer. But, as I said, there's no guarantees.


Consider offer conditions 'ABB', if you receive these exact grades (in any order; unless a specific subjects or specific subjects require an A) then it is safe to assume that "you achieved the offer conditions". If you get the grades of 'AAB' or 'A*BB' then there's very little reason to believe why you wouldn't be guaranteed a place, there is very little reason to believe why you haven't "achieved the offer conditions". But how can you say for certain, or do you have any proof, that getting the grades of 'AAC' (which are equivalent in UCAS Tariff value to grades of 'ABB') constitutes "not achieving the offer conditions"?

I am aware of what you said as being that what is commonly taught/told to many UCAS applicants in regards to conditional offers. And I thank you for sharing that, for both trying to clarify it to me but also to any who may be confused and stumble upon this discussion. However, I'm not just afraid that I might not get my offer and I'm overthinking things, this discussion revolves around a curiosity of mine that has become independent of my own case (despite the fact that my case is a prime example).

Maybe these two questions will clarify said curiosity:

1.

Does the achievement of grades like 'AAC' constitute the achievement of offer conditions like 'ABB'?

2.

What is all the proof or experience (that anyone here has; you have) objectively confirming that the answer to 1. is the case for most universities.


If a university receives information confirming that an applicant has "achieved the grades of AAC" where the conditions of his/her offer were "ABB". How can you confidently say that they will put this application in the pile of "BELOW OFFER CONDITIONS"?

In other words, what is objectively/exactly meant by "this offer is subject to you receiving the GCE A-Level grades of XYZ"?
Albeit, thank you for any and all feedback to this concern of mine (and perhaps others).

Kind Regards,
monad
Original post by monad.dev
Consider offer conditions 'ABB', if you receive these exact grades (in any order; unless a specific subjects or specific subjects require an A) then it is safe to assume that "you achieved the offer conditions". If you get the grades of 'AAB' or 'A*BB' then there's very little reason to believe why you wouldn't be guaranteed a place, there is very little reason to believe why you haven't "achieved the offer conditions". But how can you say for certain, or do you have any proof, that getting the grades of 'AAC' (which are equivalent in UCAS Tariff value to grades of 'ABB':wink: constitutes "not achieving the offer conditions"?

I am aware of what you said as being that what is commonly taught/told to many UCAS applicants in regards to conditional offers. And I thank you for sharing that, for both trying to clarify it to me but also to any who may be confused and stumble upon this discussion. However, I'm not just afraid that I might not get my offer and I'm overthinking things, this discussion revolves around a curiosity of mine that has become independent of my own case (despite the fact that my case is a prime example).

Maybe these two questions will clarify said curiosity:

1.

Does the achievement of grades like 'AAC' constitute the achievement of offer conditions like 'ABB'?

2.

What is all the proof or experience (that anyone here has; you have) objectively confirming that the answer to 1. is the case for most universities.


If a university receives information confirming that an applicant has "achieved the grades of AAC" where the conditions of his/her offer were "ABB". How can you confidently say that they will put this application in the pile of "BELOW OFFER CONDITIONS"?

In other words, what is objectively/exactly meant by "this offer is subject to you receiving the GCE A-Level grades of XYZ"?
Albeit, thank you for any and all feedback to this concern of mine (and perhaps others).

Kind Regards,
monad

The answer to 1 is no they are not the same and therefore will not have met the conditions to the offer. It would have been met had the offer been based on ucas points rather than specific grades.
Most universities for those grades will probably end up in clearing unless it is a contextual offer. In practice the vast majority of universities other than a few at the top end and for medicine accept at least 1 dropped grade and it is highly likely you would be accepted even without meeting the offer. There is no guarentee this will happen but that is what has happened in recent years. It might be worth looking into whether the course has been in clearing the last few years. If it has it is very likely it will be this year as well.
Reply 5
Original post by swanseajack1
The answer to 1 is no they are not the same and therefore will not have met the conditions to the offer. It would have been met had the offer been based on ucas points rather than specific grades.
Most universities for those grades will probably end up in clearing unless it is a contextual offer. In practice the vast majority of universities other than a few at the top end and for medicine accept at least 1 dropped grade and it is highly likely you would be accepted even without meeting the offer. There is no guarentee this will happen but that is what has happened in recent years. It might be worth looking into whether the course has been in clearing the last few years. If it has it is very likely it will be this year as well.


Most candidates with a one grade miss end up being accepted by their firm, many people with a 2 grade miss are also accepted.
Reply 6
they're not the same as whilst you've exceeded the reqs in two subjects, you've missed the reqs in one and therefore haven't met the entry criteria (stupid ik, should be based on points average imo but whatever)

essentially what this tells you is that when revising, no point in pushing for a higher grade in one subject if it means you don't have time to get the minimum grade in another
Reply 7
In the last two years when courses were over subscribed on results day due to high grades, many students were rejected as it was an easy route for the universities to reduce numbers. In a standard year it is much more likely. If you look at discoveruni.gov.uk under entry requirements you can see what the actual grade bands they have accepted for a specific course and uni. This really helps for you to decide which firm and insurance choice to pick. The firm could be one which might not be a flexible and the insurance would be more flexible. Even if the actual offer is the same.

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