Revision techniques

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Gypseysherratt
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Hi all,
i have my MOCKS gcse's starting tomorrow and i really need help with revision techniques as i am just reading a book but no information is gong in so i really need help with some revision techniques for:

respect
all three sciences
math
English
history!
so any techniques you find the best please tell me
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DrawTheLine
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Mind maps, flash card, using quizlet, past papers.
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gothai7
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For maths and sciences, i would do practice papers and questions (e.g wjec gcse questions bank- even if you're not doing that board, it's still helpful). For maths i would recommend doing the shorter 45 min practice papers on the congleton manths lifcloud page thingybob. You need to remember wuite a lot of info for history so you might want to make mindmaps or try practice questions and write bullet point points for them. Also quizlets good for remembering dates and whatnot.
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CoolCavy
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Moved to Revision and study tips
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BA67
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For maths and science:
1) Cornell notes (condensing notes from a text book onto A4)
2) Flash cards
3) Practice exam questions
For English and other languages:
1) Flash cards
2) Cornell notes
For History:
1) Flash cards
2) Mind maps (extended
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Leelee.campy
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For English use flash cards and write out the quote but miss out key words because not only will you revise the words you will also learn the quote then write a summary for each chapter or section so you know what point the extract is in the play/novel
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Leelee.campy
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(Original post by gothai7)
For maths and sciences, i would do practice papers and questions (e.g wjec gcse questions bank- even if you're not doing that board, it's still helpful). For maths i would recommend doing the shorter 45 min practice papers on the congleton manths lifcloud page thingybob. You need to remember wuite a lot of info for history so you might want to make mindmaps or try practice questions and write bullet point points for them. Also quizlets good for remembering dates and whatnot.
I would also recommend doing past papers for English language so you get used to picking out key pieces of information
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gothai7
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(Original post by Leelee.campy)
I would also recommend doing past papers for English language so you get used to picking out key pieces of information
Yes, very useful
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LarissaAlves
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Reading books is the possibly the worst technique because it's too passive, you're not really doing anything.
Here are a few things I've picked up from a website called the Learning Scientists:

1. create a timetable and plan all your days from here to the mocks
1.1. study more than one subject/topic per day because it's better to do small chunks than long periods on the same thing
1.2. study the same subject/topic again a few days later. You'll always forget stuff, so if you revise again, your memory gets stronger
1.3. https://www.kent-teach.com/Blog/post...-learning.aspx

2. make visual notes
2.1. things are harder to understand when it's only words.
2.2. mind maps, colour coding, timelines, diagrams

3. practice questions. That's the most important one, I'd say.
3.1. we learn way much more when we test our memory than when we just read
3.2. flash cards, past papers, Seneca Learning and Tassomai

Good luck!
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bfm.mcdermott
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Science = Read through the revision guide. Get people to test you and correct you over and over again. Make flashcards or use an online study tool such as Quizlet. Practise questions. Memorise formulae.

Maths = Go over rules (i.e. circle theorems, triangle facts). Then try and draw them on a whiteboard.piece of paper. If you can't, look back at the notes and keep going until you've memorised it. Learn equations using flashcards. Then PRACTISE QUESTIONS and lots of them.

English Language = Read newspaper articles, reviews, etc. and annotate them. Practise writing imaginative writing pieces or lettes - whatever you're required to do in the exam. Practise makes perfect. Then you can ask your teacher to mark them for you (but even if you don't, it's still useful).

English Literature = Memorise quotes using flashcards or Quizlet. Get your family to test you on them. Read revision guides/online notes. Have discussions with friends exploring the themes and make mindmaps. Make notes for how you would answer some essays - jot down the key ideas.

History = read over your notes/the textbook. Be tested. Write down key points on post-it notes and go through them. Use Quizlet to learn statistics or dates. Practise essays!

Revision is the most useful when you are DOING something with the information, rather than just reading it. So say it, teach it to someone, be tested on it, answer practise questions, etc.
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